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Article

Ki Heun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine a newly initiated strategy for international cooperation in criminal justice; specifically, the facilitation of a “Korean Desk”…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a newly initiated strategy for international cooperation in criminal justice; specifically, the facilitation of a “Korean Desk” between the Philippines and the Republic of Korea, as a case of successful collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

International efforts to formulate and implement the Korean Desk are reviewed, by collecting legal and administrative literature on its implementation.

Findings

The Korean Desk, as a newly implemented strategy to handle the increasing incidence of crime by and against Koreans in the Philippines, showed that direct communication and collaboration between police agencies significantly increased effectiveness. Creating the Korean Desk greatly assisted the resolution of criminal matters including extradition, cyber-crime, murder, robbery and others that involved Korean suspects and offenders in Korea and Philippines. The paper describes how the implementation of the Korean Desk evolved, the different roles of the Korean Desk and the police consul, and the substantial, positive outcomes of the project.

Practical implications

Law-enforcement agencies are constantly formulating new approaches to enhance international anti-crime efforts. The successful collaboration described in this paper provides new insights and ideas for how, through close cooperation, agencies can benefit from, and enhance, those efforts. The paper shows how direct communication between the Korean Desk and local police in the Philippines can facilitate investigations, making them efficient and timely. Evaluation of the Korean Desk suggests that it has greatly contributed to international law enforcement.

Originality/value

The overall steps for formulating the Korean Desk strategy and implementing it are examined.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article

Kyung Ae Chung and Cecil G. Miskel

Using a structured observation technique, five secondary principalsfrom school districts in a large metropolitan area of Korea wereobserved for 27 days. Extensive…

Abstract

Using a structured observation technique, five secondary principals from school districts in a large metropolitan area of Korea were observed for 27 days. Extensive interviews were conducted to help explain the meanings of the observed managerial behaviours and to compare the reported behaviours to those of their American counterparts. Korean principals spent more time at their desks, on trips away from their schools and on personal matters than American principals and less time in meetings, monitoring, touring and personal exchanges. Both groups allocate their time according to their stated priorities of programme development, personnel issues and school management. However, neither actually spend as much time on programme development as they believe they do.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

Tae-Hee Choi

Using teacher certification to induce educational change is a common practice in many countries. However, teacher change from these certification programmes, in…

Abstract

Purpose

Using teacher certification to induce educational change is a common practice in many countries. However, teacher change from these certification programmes, in particular, from the widely used “short-term” programmes, is not given due attention. Do teachers change on short-term programmes? Is teacher development (TD) on short-term programmes qualitatively different from that of long-term programmes? Answering these questions, the purpose of this paper is to address the identified research gap and contribute to the ongoing discussion on an effective teacher education provision.

Design/methodology/approach

This comparative, qualitative study mainly draws on a case study of an in-service certification programme in South Korea. It also draws on publications which report on TD on a comparable, long-term certification programme in the USA. In both contexts, semi-structured interviews, lesson observations, and document research were conducted and the data were analysed through thematic content analysis.

Findings

Participants experienced three major, interrelated patterns of cognitive change: capturing and repositioning their assumptions, gaining and seeking pedagogical implications, and inner conflicts and reconciliation in both programmes. The participants also found their learning an emotional process. TD on the short-term programme was not qualitatively different from that of a comparable long-term programme.

Originality/value

This is the first paper which systematically investigates TD from a short-term training, as compared to a comparable long-term programme. This research has significance as it has implications for effective design and management of TD programmes.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Book part

Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

As the bell rang, sounding the beginning of the school day, Ji-Sook (Elizabeth) entered the classroom, her pink tweed coat and mittens still frosty from the snow outside…

Abstract

As the bell rang, sounding the beginning of the school day, Ji-Sook (Elizabeth) entered the classroom, her pink tweed coat and mittens still frosty from the snow outside. This was Ji-Sook's second year of school in Canada and her first year at Streamside School. She really liked it here and loved her teacher, Ms. Song Lee. Ms. Lee was always sharing stories with the class about her experiences growing up in another country as well as her arrival to Canada and growing up in small towns where Ms. Lee was often the only Chinese person in her school. Listening to Ms. Lee's stories helped Ji-Sook think about Korea and her family there.Removing her coat, Ji-Sook moved quickly to hang it up, her dark curly bobbed hair bouncing as she skipped. Her newly permed hair felt different, but she liked the way it looked. Today Ji-Sook was wearing a favourite outfit, a knitted sweater with a matching plaid skirt. After hanging up her coat, Ji-Sook turned to face the class and noticed that along with her teacher, Ms. Lee, was Ms. Mitton and Ms. Simmee. Ji-Sook was surprised to see Ms. Mitton and Ms. Simmee at school on a Tuesday morning for they usually came in the afternoon. She greeted them happily and took another close look around the room for Ms. Jean. Ji-Sook asked Ms. Mitton where Ms. Jean was; Ms. Mitton smiled and reminded Ji-Sook that Ms. Jean would be coming Wednesday afternoon. Ji-Sook remembered to ask if Ms. Mitton would read with her during shared reading time.Ji-Sook knew it was going to be a very special day. Yesterday afternoon Ms. Lee had reminded the children that in the morning they were to begin a wonderful art project and create their own Starry Night paintings. Quickly Ji-Sook removed the book about Van Gogh, which discussed his Starry Night painting, from her backpack and, before everyone was seated, showed Ms. Lee and Ms. Simmee her book from home. The night before, she and her mother had spent time reading the book aloud. Ji-Sook felt it was much easier to read aloud in Korean than in English. Today's art lesson was out of the ordinary for she loved being able to bring things from home that fit with what they were learning in the classroom. And today was very special.Before going to her desk, Ji-Sook retrieved the poetry book that had a picture of a boy peering over the end of a sidewalk,1 Ji-Sook hurried to her desk and sat down and waited for Ms. Mitton to join her for reading. Seated with three of her classmates at a table composed of 4 desks, she smiled at Nathan, Grace, and Dana. There was so much to be excited about as she knew that after school today there were parent teacher interviews. Ji-Sook knew her mother was not working at the deli shop and was going to come to the interviews with their neighbour who would translate for her. Ji-Sook so loved it when her mother came to school. Once Ms. Mitton arrived, she and Ji-Sook spent a few minutes reading aloud together before Ms. Mitton went to join Ji-Sook's friend, Hailey, who had also asked Ms. Mitton to read with her. Ji-Sook continued to read and look at the drawings in this wonderful book.Adjusting her headset and microphone, Ms. Lee asked Ella, the class's ‘star-of-the-week’, to tap on the desks of each group to indicate that they were to come to the sharing area. Ji-Sook waited excitedly for Ella to tap her group's desks and then she hurriedly joined Grace, Nathan, Dana, and the rest of her classmates on the foam mats by the picture window. Ms. Lee began the art lesson by showing examples of Starry Night paintings completed by the students she had taught last year. Ms. Lee then shared the rubric with which Ji-Sook and her friends could assess their paintings. Ji-Sook knew that Ms. Lee worked with Mrs. D, the other Grade 3 teacher, and that students in both classes would be making the paintings. Once Ms. Lee finished explaining the steps of their art lesson, she asked Ji-Sook if she would like to come and share the book she brought from home.Sitting at the front of the class in Ms. Lee's chair and wearing her microphone, Ji-Sook read aloud from the book. The book was in Korean and Ji-Sook scanned each page quickly before explaining to the class bits and pieces about Van Gogh's life. Ji-Sook, reading from her book, explained that Van Gogh cut off his ear because he couldn’t draw his own portrait properly. Ms. Lee later returned to this detail and asked about how this piece of information in Ji-Sook's book was different from what they had previously read about the artist. The children remembered that Van Gogh cut off his ear for a woman he loved and had offered his ear as a gift to her. Ms. Lee asked the class to think about these two different pieces of information. Following this question Ms. Lee asked what the children might do to ensure the information they found was accurate. Logan suggested that reading many sources would help.Ms. Lee then drew the children's attention to Ji-Sook and said that as Ji-Sook read she was doing two things at the same time. She asked the class what they thought she was doing. Mya suggested Ji-Sook was reading and then talking. Picking up on Mya's point, Ms. Lee emphasized that Ji-Sook was reading in Korean first and then translating what she read into English. Ms. Lee asked Ji-Sook if she would like to read aloud in Korean. Ji-Sook momentarily hesitated but responded with a smile when her classmates encouraged her. Ji-Sook read one page aloud. She read quickly and the rhythm of how she read aloud in Korean sounded very different from her reading skills in English.Paper and crayons were distributed. Ji-Sook, Grace, Nathan, and Dana were quiet as they began their Starry Night paintings. Looking over the rubric that Ms. Lee had explained, Ji-Sook understood the first step today was to plan the sky and landscape of her painting. She knew the sky was to be about 2/3 of the paper and that everything she drew was to be in small dashes. It was important for the sky of her painting to look like it was moving. Ji-Sook was aware of Ms. Lee moving about the classroom, helping her classmates check, whether or not, the sky in their paintings was approximately the right size. As everyone worked, Ji-Sook heard Ms. Lee remind the class to press hard with their crayons so that the paint would have something to cling to as it dried. Taking Ms. Lee's advice seriously, Ji-Sook pressed firmly each time her crayons touched the paper, and soon her right arm grew tired. Ji-Sook now had a better idea about what Ms. Lee meant by this art project taking a long time to complete. (Interim research text based on field notes,2 November 21, 2006)

Details

Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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Article

Sheau‐yueh J. Chao and Ching Chang

The Internet and World Wide Web offer a rapidly increasing quantity of valuable resources on Asia‐specific information. In view of the vast scope of the Asian countries…

Abstract

The Internet and World Wide Web offer a rapidly increasing quantity of valuable resources on Asia‐specific information. In view of the vast scope of the Asian countries and the fast proliferation of good sites, this article offers only a sampling of valuable Internet resources as starting points for further exploration. It covers meta sites, Asian search engines, library resource pages, and electronic journals and newspapers. The first part of this paper includes the Internet sites of Asian studies, the second part contains selected East Asian country resources from China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, and the third part presents the leading Asian electronic journals and newspapers. Preference was given to comprehensive sites on countries or regions that have been the focus of recent academic study and research. All the sources are in English and some of them contain bilingual or multilingual versions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article

Javier Cha

This study aims to reflect on the past and prospects of digital Korean studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reflect on the past and prospects of digital Korean studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion includes the remarkably early adoption of computing in the Korean humanities, the astounding pace in which Korean heritage materials have been digitized, and the challenges of balancing artisanal and laboratory approaches to digital research.

Findings

The main takeaway is to reconsider the widespread tendency in the digital humanities to privilege frequentist analysis and macro-level perspectives.

Practical implications

Cha hopes to discover the future of digital Korean studies in semantic networks, graph databases and anthropological inquiries.

Originality/value

Cha reconsiders existing tendencies in the digital humanities and looks to the future of digital Korean studies.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article

Tauchid Komara Yuda

Political analyses of the East Asian welfare state development often stress the importance of the power resource model, in which vibrant coalitions between the leftist…

Abstract

Purpose

Political analyses of the East Asian welfare state development often stress the importance of the power resource model, in which vibrant coalitions between the leftist party, interest groups, civil society and working-class unions have become driving factors in producing generous welfare outcomes. Challenging such analyses, this article discusses the convergence of the political attitude between political actors who are increasingly homogeneous (supportive) when it comes to the universal welfare state notion by focussing on childcare in South Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

By using desk review of the peer-reviewed literature and reports, this article investigates the causation for why political parties with different political ideologies were keen on extending childcare programs and its outcome in addressing the existing demographic problems in Korea.

Findings

Although the collective movement, especially in the 1990s and 2000s, had given important contributions to the early development of childcare in South Korea, more breakthroughs in childcare features were precisely and rapidly developed after politicians from different spectrums of political affiliations converged in their supportive attitude of the universal welfare. The driving factors of political convergence itself are not merely due to electoral competition or political activism; furthermore, it can be linked to the increased global institution involvement in domestic policy with extensive permeability, which, have ruined domestic policy development maintained for ideological reasoning and bring in more popular policy setting.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the growing literature on the political aspect of East Asian social policy studies, which goes beyond the traditional power resource analysis and makes a novel contribution to the childcare policy studies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Yukang Wang, Anne Marie Van Broeck and Dominique Vanneste

In the recent decades, an increasing trend has been observed in the steps North Korea has taken to open up to tourism. The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper…

Abstract

Purpose

In the recent decades, an increasing trend has been observed in the steps North Korea has taken to open up to tourism. The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of the influence the North Korean political ideology has on different aspects of international tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Apart from the scarce academic literature, news media and internet resources, fieldwork that includes interviews with two international travel companies and a trip to North Korea contributed to gathering information from different perspectives.

Findings

It is not surprising that North Korean tourism cannot be divorced from its political context. By looking at the political influence exerted by the North Korean Government on the structure of the industry, tourism policies applied to the organization of tours and the content of tourism and marketing, this paper shows the existence of elements that remained unchanged in the last three decades, as well as new liberal elements that transform North Korea into a more open and versatile tourism destination.

Originality/value

Based on an analysis of primary and secondary data, this paper makes original contributions to North Korea tourism studies by investigating the influence of the political ideology on different aspects of tourism industry and on tourist experience.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article

John Lie

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore…

Abstract

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore, look for the sources of later dynamism in this period. As Kyung Cho Chung (1956:225) wrote in the mid‐1950s: “[South Korea] faces grave economic difficulties. The limitations imposed by the Japanese have been succeeded by the division of the country, the general destruction incurred by the Korean War, and the attendant dislocation of the population, which has further disorganized the economy” (see also McCune 1956:191–192). T.R. Fehrenbach (1963:37), in his widely read book on the Korean War, prognosticated: “By themselves, the two halves [of Korea] might possibly build a viable economy by the year 2000, certainly not sooner.”

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part

Dae Ryun Chang

This paper is a focused examination of the parallel collectivistic and individualistic tendencies of South Korean consumers. The “We-Me” concept argues that the two…

Abstract

This paper is a focused examination of the parallel collectivistic and individualistic tendencies of South Korean consumers. The “We-Me” concept argues that the two seemingly countervailing tendencies can actually co-exist. The paper discusses the phenomenon, its underlying causes, and the strategic implications of how to market to such consumers.

Details

Cross-Cultural Buyer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-485-0

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