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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Ave Adriana Pinem, Ivonne Margi Immanuella, Achmad Nizar Hidayanto, Kongkiti Phusavat and Meyliana

This study aims to understand the antecedent of trust towards government-to-business (G2B) service in Indonesia. Trust will be viewed through four aspects, namely…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the antecedent of trust towards government-to-business (G2B) service in Indonesia. Trust will be viewed through four aspects, namely, cognition-based trust, personality-oriented trust, affect-based trust and experience–based trust. Then, these antecedents of trust were examined as the factors of continuance intention by extending the expected confirmation theory (ECT).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a quantitative approach, and 389 respondents were involved in the study. The respondents are the investors who represent their organization which uses e-government service to report their investment activities to the Investment Coordinating Board of Indonesia. Data were analyzed using partial least square structural equation modelling approach with WarpPLS 4.0.

Findings

The result shows that factors that determine a user’s trust in government online service are service quality, trust towards government entity, recommendation to use the service and user’s habit of using the service. Factors that do not determine a user’s trust in government online service is a disposition to trust. Another finding is that a user’s trust on an online service does not directly influence his/her continuance of use. Trust will impact the continuance of use through perceptions of benefits and perceived satisfaction of using the online service.

Research limitations/implications

ECT is applicable in G2B process. Organizations have a perception of benefit while using a public e-service and confirm the perception through their experience while using an e-service to gain satisfaction, and this will encourage them to continue using the service.

Practical implications

To improve organizations’ trust on the e-service, the government needs to improve the e-service quality (by evaluating the efficiency, privacy, user support, reliability and information quality), investor familiarity of the system (training or socialization), investor trust on the government entity (improve the employee competence) and recommendation on using the system.

Originality/value

Trust dimension has also been studied to be a factor that influences the intention or continuance of use of technology; however, it has rarely been studied towards its effect in the ECT’s context. In e-government study, there are various studies related to government-to-citizen (G2C) concept. However, the research in government-to-business (G2B) area that has not been explored much.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Kongkiti Phusavat, Bordin Vongvitayapirom, Pekka Kess and Binshan Lin

The purpose of this paper is to report the key results and lessons of a study in Thailand. Occupational safety and health is the foundation of ISO 26000, which emphasizes…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the key results and lessons of a study in Thailand. Occupational safety and health is the foundation of ISO 26000, which emphasizes on corporate social responsibility. This study underlines the needs on gradually preparing the industries for market integration.

Design/methodology/approach

Two leading companies in automotive and energy industries are selected. The automotive industry is one of Thailand’s largest clusters in terms of investment, employment, and sale turnovers. On the other hand, the energy industry is critical as Thailand seeks to import energies from neighboring and other countries. The in-depth analysis aims to identify excellent practices, elements, and success factors commonly shared by the two selected companies. The interviews with the companies’ executives follow this identification for the findings’ confirmation and possible extension.

Findings

The findings provide a description of the process of how an integrated safety management system is implemented and reports results such as the following. The two leading companies apparently share many common practices, elements, and success factors. They include safety culture (empowerment, behavior, communication, etc.), system and structure (processes, instruction, documentations, records, etc.), and use of external influences (e.g. safety audits by international partners and customers) to sustain the safety management system.

Originality/value

This study should inform executives and managers who are concerned with how to prepare an organization when attempting to adapt to Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems 18000 and subsequently to ISO 26000. Building a strong safety culture should be considered as the foundation, while relying on regulatory compliance and enforcement alone is not adequate.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Gary Alexander Parung, Achmad Nizar Hidayanto, Puspa Indahati Sandhyaduhita, Karina Lia Meirita Ulo and Kongkiti Phusavat

This study aims to propose strategies to address the identified major barriers for giving the public open access to government data. The study adopts fuzzy analytical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose strategies to address the identified major barriers for giving the public open access to government data. The study adopts fuzzy analytical hierarchy process and technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution (AHP-TOPSIS) to weigh the barriers and strategies, and it subsequently involves experts to identify and weigh the barriers and strategies. A case of Indonesia is used to contextualize the study.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using fuzzy AHP-TOPSIS-based questionnaires given to several government representatives who had been working with data and information. The respondents were given sets of pairwise comparisons of which they were asked to compare the level of importance using one to nine fuzzy numbers between barriers and strategies. The data were then calculated using the fuzzy AHP-TOPSIS formula to obtain each weight of the barriers and strategies. The weight is used to prioritize the barrier and strategies.

Findings

In total, five barrier categories in the order of importance, namely, legal and privacy; government culture; social; technical; and economic, were identified from 27 barriers. In total, ten strategies of open government data (OGD) adoption were identified and ranked in the order of importance, and they can be grouped into five priorities. Priority 1 is to involve stakeholders in OGD planning and establish an OGD competence center. Priority 2 is to develop a legal compliance framework. Priority 3 is to adopt OGD gradually. Priority 4 is to create a collaboration feature on the portal for stakeholder communication and raise public awareness of OGD. Priority 5, finally, is to conduct training for government officials, develop standard operating practice for OGD management, use standard data formats and provide metadata.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a perspective from the government’s view. One suggestion for future research is to conduct a study from the public’s perspective to formulate strategies based on the identified citizens’ barriers in using OGD. In addition, cross-country (of different characteristics) studies were required to generalize the findings.

Practical implications

The first strategy of the first priority implies that government institutions should be able to develop a preliminary plan to involve relevant stakeholders in OGD planning, which includes identifying relevant stakeholders and continuously engaging them to participate in the planning phase of OGD. The second strategy in the first priority entails that government institutions should realize an OGD competence center by creating a virtual team whose members are from various backgrounds and who are very knowledgeable about OGD and how to manage OGD in government institutions.

Originality/value

This research provides key strategies to address the main barriers to giving the public open access to government data.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Rizqa Nulhusna, Puspa Indahati Sandhyaduhita, Achmad Nizar Hidayanto and Kongkiti Phusavat

This paper aims to answer a major challenge in the success of electronic government (e-government) implementation, viz., public participation via continual use intention…

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1262

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to answer a major challenge in the success of electronic government (e-government) implementation, viz., public participation via continual use intention and electronic word-of-mouth (eWoM). This study tries to provide some control by examining the impact of e-government quality on public trust and with continual use intention and eWoM. This study adopts the eminent information systems (IS) success model and expands the trust dimension into a multi-dimensional trust.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using questionnaires distributed among e-government service users in Indonesia. In total, 293 respondents were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Of the three IS success factors, namely, systems quality, information quality and service quality, the former two are found to have significant correlation with trust. Dispositional trust has a substantial relationship with institutional trust and interpersonal trust, whereas institutional trust has a significant correlation with interpersonal trust. Institutional trust exhibits direct relationship with continual use intention and eWoM, whereas interpersonal trust has a significantly correlation with only continual use intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that it is plausible that user satisfaction could act as an intermediary between service quality and trust or between service quality and continual use intention. Thus, further research studies to examine satisfaction factor and its correlation with public acceptance are encouraged.

Practical implications

Government agencies should focus on information quality and systems quality which have a significant relation with trust development. These should be more thorough and meticulous to provide complete, secure and easy-to-use e-government information. These should also facilitate eWoM because it plays an important role in disseminating e-government (services).

Originality/value

This research provides a deeper and more accurate grasp on how public participation of e-government can be improved via trust.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Kongkiti Phusavat, Achmad Nizar Hidayanto, Pekka Kess and Jussi Kantola

This study aims to develop a pedagogy which would help a school become a workplace for learning and professional development. Essentially, this objective addresses the…

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825

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a pedagogy which would help a school become a workplace for learning and professional development. Essentially, this objective addresses the following critical question. How can a school become an attractive workplace where learning and professional development of teachers positively contribute to better teaching and learning for the students?

Design/methodology/approach

The research is considered as a case study. The pilot project or experiment has taken place at Mattayom Suwitserianusorn School which is part of Bangkok Metropolitan Administration. Design Thinking and Finnish practices have been explicitly integrated into peer-learning community (PLC). Design Thinking, through the use of empathy, helps highlight the interrelationships among motivation, emotion and cognition of students. Follow-up meetings provide insights into teacher’s professional development and impacts on student’s learning. The verification is based on award and recognition gathered over the past years for students and the school.

Findings

PLC helps improve a school as a place for learning and professional development. The significance of integrating Design Thinking is extensively discussed. The project shows how co-teaching can be applied, given a proper selection of a problem. Higher motivation and better behavior among students are noticeable. The pilot project reinforces the importance of PLC in the current pedagogical development as it helps transform a school into workplace learning for both teachers and students. Blending Design Thinking helps strengthen the sustainability of PLC, as a lesson plan should be revised according to the students’ background and needs.

Research limitations/implications

The study responds to the call by several international studies for better pedagogical development and in-service training for teachers’ continuous learning and professional development. More vigorous comparisons with other schools will be needed to help verify the study’s findings. This is due to the need to have a longitudinal study of PLC’s impacts.

Practical implications

For teachers, an understanding of their common interests and the recognition on the need to learn from one another is important. For students, an understanding of their psychology and emotional intelligence through the use of Design Thinking is highlighted. Motivation, emotion and cognition of students are interrelated and can help transform a school into learning space.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the transformation of a school as a workplace for learning and professional development which is based on the aforementioned pedagogical development. Also, Design Thinking helps strengthen PLC as an alternative pedagogical practices.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Kongkiti Peter Phusavat, David Delahunty, Pekka Kess and Hanna Kropsu-Vehkapera

The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the professional/peer-learning community or PLC be developed and deployed to help strengthen in-service teacher training? The second question is what are the success factors which contribute to the continuity of the PLC within the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) context?

Design/methodology/approach

This study, considered as a case study, is based on BMA’s in-service teaching training program which took place from August 2014 until September 2016. Observations and interviews represent the key tasks undertaken for this study. Observation focuses on the PLC adaptation for a teacher network and key activities relating to actual teaching and learning. Interviews with teachers and students help evaluate the suitability of the PLC’s use as a component of in-service teacher training for workplace learning. The application proposal to international funding helps outline how the data from the observation and interviews should be grouped and analyzed.

Findings

The PLC’s implementation involves a network of teachers (those teachers who traveled to Finland for pedagogical training), the selection of a common theme (i.e. a polluted waterway reflecting environmental phenomena) allowing various different subject teachers to work together and actual teaching and learning across schools with students through project work. The results of the interviews demonstrate that a PLC is a potential alternative for BMA’s in-service teacher training. The PLC allows teachers to share their experience and knowledge while simultaneously strengthening students’ life skills through the PLC’s applications.

Research limitations/implications

The case study demonstrates the process through which the PLC is successfully deployed. The BMA applied the PLC alongside and in collaboration with the actual student teaching and learning, instead of separating them because the PLC was regarded as training. PLC is dependent on: the willingness of the teachers to work together, their ability to come up with a common topic that they can link their knowledge, enable several subject teachers to work together, an effective planning process to gradually involve the students in problem-based learning and public recognition to demonstrate their success.

Practical implications

The PLC appears to benefit workplace (or school) learning and development for both teachers and students. Additionally, the use of the PLC in this case study points to an alternative for future in-service teacher training at BMA schools. When compared with the existing practice of sitting in a room and listening to an external expert without much interaction, participating teachers feel that the PLC helps them become more motivated, through experience and knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The contribution to research is the knowledge on the PLC’s implementation for in-service teaching training (as part of workplace learning). Moreover, the PLC should be applied simultaneously with actual teaching and learning through project work. Three notable lessons learned from comparing the effectiveness of the PLC use between BMA and Finnish schools point to the importance of pre- and in-service teacher training with the focus on continuous dialogue and open communication, familiarity with integrated lesson plan and teacher autonomy.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Kongkiti Phusavat, Pornthep Anussornnitisarn, Supattra Sujitwanit and Pekka Kess

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific circumstances which require productivity information. It aims to help support the promotion of productivity for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific circumstances which require productivity information. It aims to help support the promotion of productivity for manufacturing firms belonging to the Federation of Thai Industries or FTI.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on survey data collected from FTI‐based manufacturing firms. There are five profiles: industrial type; size; years operating in business; ownership; and targeted customer to be studied in a pair‐wise circumstance. There are 40 companies that participated in this study. The statistical analyses include general linear mode with ANOVA. Altogether, there are a total of 138 circumstances (pair‐wise profiles) under study.

Findings

In general, productivity information is important as indicated from most circumstances – the must‐measure and require‐to‐measure circumstances. The findings also indicate that there is no specific prediction for particular circumstances (e.g. the larger‐size firms with longer years operating in business need productivity information than the smaller ones).

Practical implications

The results show that there is no need for the FTI to single out specific groups to focus on productivity‐measurement efforts. The study helps gain better understanding into the issues regarding when‐to‐measure productivity. It is generally known that there are a few measurement techniques that are communicated to the FTI firms on a regular basis such as multi‐factor productivity measurement and value‐added productivity measurement – what to measure. In addition, their applications are primarily at the organizational and production levels – where‐to‐measure. The process to deploy these measurement techniques is well known and documented – how‐to‐measure.

Originality/value

The findings support the use of both financial and non‐financial information to ensure an effective management process (i.e. measurement, analysis, and improvement).

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Kongkiti Phusavat and Rapee Kanchana

This paper aims to compare and evaluate competitive priorities between manufacturers and service providers. A concern over the trends of moving manufacturing/production…

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1835

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare and evaluate competitive priorities between manufacturers and service providers. A concern over the trends of moving manufacturing/production units overseas, while maintaining essential service operations at the companies' headquarters, encouraged senior administrators of the Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) to suggest the study. This study was part of an effort to support FTI members facing separate locations between manufacturing and services operations, and to help evaluate its initiatives' usefulness towards these members.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey, developed by Takala, was modified to gather the opinions from top executives of 75 manufacturers and service providers. This survey consisted of six criteria or competitive priorities with a total of 31 dimensions. The basic statistical techniques such as Cronbach's α were applied.

Findings

The paper finds that in general, top executives from manufacturing and service operations shared and agreed that delivery/service provision and quality represented their future competitive priorities.

Practical implications

The selection of these two competitive priorities was generally consistent with several previous studies. These findings supported past and current initiatives by the FTI as well as its policy on working together with key public agencies/organizations towards an achievement of excellent quality. Top executives, facing a challenge on separate operations – manufacturing plant in one location while maintaining service operations at another location, could synchronize and coordinate their future efforts such as strategies and plans around delivery/service provision, and quality.

Originality/value

The knowledge on competitive priorities could potentially help companies, regardless of operational types, to further formulate operational strategies, and later develop action plans. This knowledge could also serve as feedback (e.g. usefulness and effectiveness) and a milestone for the FTI's support and initiatives for its members.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Kongkiti Phusavat and Rapee Kanchana

This paper aims to examine and describe competitive priorities for service providers in Thailand. This research responds to the need expressed by the Federation of Thai…

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3759

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and describe competitive priorities for service providers in Thailand. This research responds to the need expressed by the Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) for understanding these priorities. This study is part of a planning session on future enhancement of its members' competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey, developed by Takala, was modified to gather feedback and opinions from top executives of ten service providers. These companies mainly provided technical services to customers. This survey consisted of six criteria or competitive priorities with a total of 31 dimensions. The analysis and computations were on both relative and global weights of the responses, derived from the analytical hierarchy process.

Findings

Quality represented the most important competitive priority. Quality was given the highest weight of 36.4 percent, while service provision, customer‐focus, and know‐how were at 20.4, 12.9 and 12.5 percent, respectively. The remaining weights were 9.8 percent for costs, and 8.0 percent for flexibility.

Practical implications

The awareness on competitive priorities was beneficial to the future organizational development of service providers in Thailand. These findings also helped reassure the FTI's current efforts on promoting quality among its members.

Originality/value

The knowledge on competitive priorities potentially helps companies formulate future strategies and action plans. It serves as feedback and a milestone for the FTI's effectiveness on promoting quality among the members in its service‐related clusters.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Kongkiti Phusavat and Rapee Kanchana

This paper seeks to identify competitive priorities, based on the opinions of top executives of manufacturing firms belonging to the Federation of Thai Industry (FTI). It…

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2920

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify competitive priorities, based on the opinions of top executives of manufacturing firms belonging to the Federation of Thai Industry (FTI). It is also to evaluate the implications and applicability of these findings for Thai manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is used as a data‐collection tool to gather the opinions of top executives. Its main contents are based on Takala (2002). Ten manufacturers from four industries have participated in the study. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) is selected to analyze the survey responses. In addition, the comparison of competitive priorities among Thailand, China, and Taiwan is made. The follow‐up interviews and discussion are also conducted.

Findings

There are six criteria selected to reflect competitive priorities: quality, customer‐focus, delivery, flexibility, know‐how, and costs. The study reveals that the quality, customer‐focus and delivery criteria are recognized as important priorities in order to enhance manufacturing firms' competitiveness. The Taiwanese experiences possibly suggest more attention on innovation in order to sustain quality improvement.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate the shift in competitive priorities from cost into quality and customer‐focus. This shift reflects intense campaigns by relevant public agencies as well as the FTI. The awareness on these priorities is critical so that companies in the value chain can properly establish coherent manufacturing strategies and objectives.

Originality/value

The knowledge on competitive priorities leads to better understanding of manufacturing strategies in the future. This knowledge can serve as a reference during an assessment of the desirable impacts from programs and initiatives conducted by public agencies and the FTI.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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