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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2024

Jonas Ekow Yankah, Kofi Owusu Adjei and Chris Kurbom Tieru

Robotics and automation are successful in construction, health and safety, but costs and expertise hinder their use in developing nations. This study examined mobile apps as a…

Abstract

Purpose

Robotics and automation are successful in construction, health and safety, but costs and expertise hinder their use in developing nations. This study examined mobile apps as a more accessible and affordable alternative.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study explored the use of mobile apps in construction, health and safety management. It used a literature review to identify their availability, accessibility, and capabilities. The study consisted of four five stages: searching for relevant apps, selecting them based on versatility, examining their specific functions, removing untested apps and discussing their functions based on empirical studies.

Findings

A comprehensive literature review identified 35 mobile apps that are relevant to health and safety management during construction. After rigorous analysis, eight apps were selected for further study based on their relevance, user friendliness and compliance with safety standards. These apps collectively serve 28 distinct functions, including first-aid training and administration, safety compliance and danger awareness, safety education and training, hazard detection and warnings.

Practical implications

This study suggests that mobile apps can provide a cost-effective and readily accessible alternative to robotics and automation in health and safety management in construction. Further research is needed to accurately assess the efficacy of these apps in real-world conditions.

Originality/value

This study explored the use of apps in health and safety management, highlighting their diverse capabilities and providing a framework for project managers, contractors and safety officers to select suitable apps.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Jonas Ekow Yankah, Divine Tuinese Novieto, Emmanuel Davies and Kofi Owusu Adjei

This study was conducted to identify, summarise, analyse and categorise mobile device applications (Apps), relevant to the construction industry and to explore their uses and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to identify, summarise, analyse and categorise mobile device applications (Apps), relevant to the construction industry and to explore their uses and exposure levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method involved reviewing literature and searching for Apps. The construction Apps were found by developing key phrases. These key phrases were used to develop search strategies, which were then used to find the construction Apps. The Apps found were categorised based on the similarity of their uses.

Findings

The 136 Apps identified were summarised, analysed, and categorised into 11 groups of distinct construction operations and tasks. The “Design and Drawing Apps”, “Measurement and Estimation Apps”, “Management Apps”, “All Round Apps” and “Construction Site Apps” recorded 29, 28, 26, 21 and 11 numbers of Apps, respectively. The Autodesk Sketchbook, GPS Field Area Measure, MagicPlan, Measure and TSheets were the top five in terms of the number of downloads. These Apps in terms of their exposure levels in the construction industry record 4.76%, 2.38%, 0.52%, 0.48% and 0.42%, respectively.

Originality/value

This paper provides a catalogue of the continuum of construction Apps for a wide variety of construction operations/activities which are available for construction professionals and provide guidance on their uses to assist in selecting appropriate Apps for specified operation/tasks/activities in the construction industry. Construction professionals may benefit from increased productivity, efficiency and ease of working.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah, Emmanuel Fiifi Musah, Frederick Botchwey, Loretta Oppong Adjei and Kofi Owusu

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent valuation survey of individual chicken meat consumers in the Kumasi Metropolitan Area of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The willingness to pay premiums are obtained using the double-bounded dichotomous choice approach. Determinants of the consumers' willingness to pay amounts are identified through a multivariate Tobit regression analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the wing is the most preferred chicken part by the consumers followed by the thighs. All consumers who express interest in a particular domestic chicken cut part are willing to pay a premium. Age, sex, years of formal education, household size and income level of the consumers as well as convenience, product availability and perceived wholesomeness of the product are identified as the key factors that influence the willingness to pay amounts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings and recommendations of this study could serve as a guide to domestic poultry meat producers and investors in Ghana and other developing countries on how to process or package the meat for the market or consumers. This could further contribute to policy formulation regarding the development of the domestic poultry meat industry.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study is seen in the contributions it makes to the literature on consumer preferences and willingness to pay for chicken cut parts from a developing country perspective where the market for these products is virtually non-existent.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

George Kofi Amoako, Peter Anabila, Ebenezer Asare Effah and Desmond Kwadjo Kumi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of brand preference on the relationship between bank advertising and customer loyalty in Ghana’s banking industry.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of brand preference on the relationship between bank advertising and customer loyalty in Ghana’s banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total number of 600 respondents participated in the study. Convenient sampling technique was employed to select a cross-section of customers from the universal banks currently operating in Ghana. Structural equation modeling technique of PLS was used to test the nature of relationships in the research hypotheses.

Findings

The study found a significant positive relationship between advertising effectiveness and brand preference. Also, there is a significant positive relationship between advertising and customer loyalty. Again, there is a significant positive relationship between brand preference and customer loyalty. Finally, brand preference positive mediates the relationships between advertising and customer loyalty.

Practical implications

The study provides a useful guide to strategy and policy formulation in marketing communication by establishing the potential viability of advertising strategy in bank marketing and its potential to generate brand preference and customer loyalty.

Originality/value

The study has practical implication for, and relevance not only to the banking industry communication strategy but also the entire financial services industry.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Ernest Kissi, Kofi Agyekum, Theophilus Adjei-Kumi, Debrah Caleb and Ekow Donkor Micheal

Religiousness is evident in every aspect of life, and its impact on construction project performance is undeniable. However, little has been done to fully understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

Religiousness is evident in every aspect of life, and its impact on construction project performance is undeniable. However, little has been done to fully understand the influences one's religiosity has on performance factors. This paper aims to explore the influence of religious elements on performance factors in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a desk survey and closed-ended questionnaire, data were obtained from the three religious' bodies (Christianity, Islamic and Traditionalist) in Ghana. The analysis of the collected data was done using mean score ranking and regression analysis.

Findings

It was revealed that most of the religious bodies were aware of the presence of the seven factors identified for measuring construction project performance. The findings suggested that there was a significant and positive relationship between the religious elements (of all the three religions) and cost as well as schedule performance. Islam recorded the highest relationship in influencing public construction project performance relative to cost performances. Specifically, 1% increase in Islamic elements accounted for an 82.7% increase in cost performance. Traditionalists and the Christian religion had minimal significance in influencing cost performance. Furthermore, a 1% progress in Islamic elements accounted for a 45.8% increase in the schedule performance of construction projects and among construction professionals.

Research limitations/implications

This study has provided better understanding of the religious views on project performance. This research has also provided pragmatic directions to project stakeholders to encourage religious groups to take critical look at the other performance factors that were seen not to be significant.

Originality/value

This paper represents a novel attempt to measure the influence of religious elements on project performance factors in the construction industry. A key contribution to the body of knowledge is that the study has proven that religious element has tendencies to influence cost performance and schedule performance in the construction industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Ernest Kissi, Kofi Agyekum, Labaran Musah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu and Caleb Debrah

Supply chain (SC) disruption, whether demand sided or supply sided, is conversely perceived to affect organisational performance of construction firms. This paper, therefore, aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain (SC) disruption, whether demand sided or supply sided, is conversely perceived to affect organisational performance of construction firms. This paper, therefore, aims to examine the linkage of supply chain disruptions with organisational performance of construction firms through the moderating role of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative research, approach the views of 84 construction professionals were elicited using a structured questionnaire. Ordinary least squares were utilised to validate the hypotheses set.

Findings

The study proved that there is a negative relationship between demand-related disruption and business performance as well as project performance. Also, it was clear from the study that supply-related disruptions had a significant impact on both project performance and business performance. Although SC innovation was seen to impact business performance, it had no relationship with project performance. Generally, innovation was seen to have a moderating effect of demand and supply disruption of project performance, but it played no moderating role in business performance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that business firms must be innovative with the supply chain, as it moderated project success. The supply chain of a construction firm plays a very critical role on projects; hence, this study recommends that a supply chain manager ought to be innovative in their operations due to the moderating role SC innovation has on project performance and largely business performance.

Originality/value

Various studies on supply chain has been done on different sectors in the economy; however, little can be said about the construction industry on how supply chain disruptions affects business and project performance and how innovation moderates such effects.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Patrick Manu, Richard Ohene Asiedu, Abdul-Majeed Mahamadu, Paul Olaniyi Olomolaiye, Colin Booth, Emmanuel Manu, Saheed Ajayi and Kofi Agyekum

Effective procurement of infrastructure is linked to the attainment of the sustainable development goals set by the United Nations. While the capacity of organisations is…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective procurement of infrastructure is linked to the attainment of the sustainable development goals set by the United Nations. While the capacity of organisations is generally thought to be related to organisational performance, there is a lack of empirical insights concerning the contribution of procurement capacity of public organisations towards the attainment of procurement objectives in infrastructure procurement. Thus, it is unclear which aspects of the capacity of public procurement organisations contribute the most to the attainment of procurement objectives in the procurement of infrastructure. This research sought to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a survey of public procurement professionals which yielded 590 responses.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis of 23 organisational capacity items revealed three components of organisational procurement capacity: “management of the procurement process”; “human and physical resources”; and “financial resources and management”. Multiple regression modelling of the relationship between the components and the attainment of 12 procurement objectives further reveals that there is a significant positive relationship between the three components and all the objectives. However, “management of the procurement process” emerged as the greatest contributor to the attainment of seven objectives, whereas “human and physical resources”, and “financial resources and management” were the greatest contributor to the attainment of one objective and four objectives, respectively.

Originality/value

The study provides strong empirical justification for investment in the development of procurement capacity of public agencies involved in procurement of infrastructure. Furthermore, procurement capacity development of specific capacity components can be prioritised based on the relative contribution of capacity components to the attainment of desired procurement objectives. This should be useful to government policymakers as well as multilateral organisations that fund infrastructure and procurement reforms in various countries.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Amma Kyewaa Agyekum, Frank Desmond Kofi Fugar, Kofi Agyekum, Isaac Akomea-Frimpong and Hayford Pittri

The absence of effective stakeholder engagement at the early planning and implementation stages impact projects negatively. However, the role of stakeholders in Sustainable…

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Abstract

Purpose

The absence of effective stakeholder engagement at the early planning and implementation stages impact projects negatively. However, the role of stakeholders in Sustainable Procurement (SP) is not well recognized and as such there is limited involvement of stakeholders in sustainable procurement of public (SPP) works. This research aims to examine the barriers to stakeholder engagement in SPP works.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 104 respondents from eight procurement entities of tertiary institutions in Ghana was undertaken and validated with seven procurement experts. After satisfying all the necessary tests of reliability of the survey instrument and sample size, the data was subjected to the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to determine the critical barriers.

Findings

The study's results indicate that there are three cluster of barriers to stakeholder engagement in SPP works. They are organisational structures and knowledge driven factors, attitudinal and stakeholder fatigue and relational and information sharing processes.

Practical implications

This study offers relevant data for policy makers, organisations and local communities in establishing controls against barriers to stakeholder engagement. Furthermore, this research presents policy makers with recommendations to improve communication and organisational policies in enhancing stakeholder participation in SPP works in Ghana and other developing countries.

Originality/value

Although studies on SP has increased with time, issues such as obstacles to stakeholder engagement in SP remain unexplored. Empirical data presented in this study bridges the gap that exists on the barriers of stakeholder engagement in SPP works in the Ghana Construction Industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Anthony Amoah, Rexford Kweku Asiama and Kofi Korle

This paper acknowledges the rising levels of non-performing loans (NPLs) and the consequences associated with such patterns to an emerging economy like Ghana. In theory, one would…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper acknowledges the rising levels of non-performing loans (NPLs) and the consequences associated with such patterns to an emerging economy like Ghana. In theory, one would expect rising NPLs to have a negative impact on an economy, especially regarding credit creation and private sector growth. This research, consistent with empirical literature, constructs a measure of financial market development to investigate its effect on Ghana's NPLs.

Design/methodology/approach

The fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) econometric technique is used as a way of addressing common time series identification issues such as endogeneity and serial correlation.

Findings

The study finds that the growth of the financial market has a negative and statistically significant relationship with NPLs in Ghana. Therefore, building a stable financial sector is key to addressing Ghana’s rising rates of NPLs.

Practical implications

Applying the breaks to Ghana's NPLs would involve deepening credit and improving efficiency through good governance. The study suggests that such a mechanism would increase financial sector performance and reduce the growth risks arising from the industry.

Originality/value

The study analyzes the influence of financial market development on the quarterly growth of NPLs in Ghana. Most studies only focus on annual growth of NPLs.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Evans Asante Boadi, Zheng He, Eric Kofi Boadi, Josephine Bosompem and Philip Avornyo

The purpose of this paper is to draw on affect social exchange theory and related literature to develop and test a research model linking employees’ perception of corporate social…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on affect social exchange theory and related literature to develop and test a research model linking employees’ perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to their outcomes [performance and organisational pride (ORP)] with moderating variables: perceived work motivation patterns (autonomous and controlled motivation) to sustain firm’s operations through their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used Ghana as a case for this study due to recent turbulences in the banking sector of Ghana. A sample data of 244 subordinate/supervisor dyads from rural and community banks was collected with a time-lagged technique and analysed through a structural equation modelling for this study.

Findings

These employee’s perceptions of CSR positively related to their performance and ORP. Autonomous motivated employees had a stronger positive moderated impact on perceived CSR-Performance link whereas controlled motivated employees recorded a stronger impact on perceived CSR-ORP link.

Practical implications

Based on these results, managers and human resource (HR) professionals can aim at acquiring favourable employees’ perception of their firms’ CSR initiatives. In that, it can help firms to remain in business particularly in difficult times. Also, autonomous and controlled motivators may seem inversely related, however, they are not contradictory to each other. Both can coexist within a firm and it is crucial that HR professionals and managers endeavour to balance them discreetly to attain organisational goals.

Originality/value

Despite the growing interest in CSR across continents, CSR outcomes on employees among small and medium scale firms especially in Africa has fairly been toned-down by respective management of firms, governments and researchers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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