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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Graeme McLean, Kofi Osei-Frimpong, Alan Wilson and Valentina Pitardi

By adopting a social presence theory perspective, this study aims investigate the influence of perceived usefulness of live chat services and of their unique human…

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1434

Abstract

Purpose

By adopting a social presence theory perspective, this study aims investigate the influence of perceived usefulness of live chat services and of their unique human attributes on customer attitudes, beliefs and behaviours in the context of online travel shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a cross-sectional survey research involving 8 travel provider websites and 631 travel consumers, this work applies structural equation modelling to analyse the data.

Findings

The results illustrate that the perceived usefulness from the communication with a human live chat assistant positively influences customer attitudes and trust towards the website as well as increasing purchase intention. The findings further illustrate the role of the human social cues conveyed by live chat facilities, namely, human warmth, human assurance, human attentiveness and human customised content in positively moderating this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to specific human attributes. Future research could investigate the role of other human characteristics as well as assess the ability of artificial intelligent powered chatbots in replicating the human elements outlined in this research.

Originality/value

The study provides a unique contribution to the travel literature by offering empirical insights and conceptual clarity into the usefulness of human operated live chat communication on travellers’ attitudes, trust towards the website and purchase intentions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Kofi Osei-Frimpong

Considering the increasing conceptualization of value creation, this paper aims to empirically examine the influence of pre-encounter value needs of patients on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the increasing conceptualization of value creation, this paper aims to empirically examine the influence of pre-encounter value needs of patients on the clinical encounter process and how this impacts on their perceived experiential value, and contributes to the patient’s role in value creation in healthcare service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is proposed to suggest the antecedent and consequences of key elements of the patient–doctor encounter process. Following survey design approach, data collected from 332 outpatients from two clinics in Accra, Ghana, are examined through structural equation modeling using AMOS 23.0.

Findings

The findings reveal that patient pre-encounter value needs significantly influence key elements of the patient–doctor encounter process (care delivery approach, level of trust and shared-decision making approach). This in turn affects patient’s perceived experiential value and satisfaction evaluation. The results also suggest that patient characteristics (e.g. educational background and frequency of visit) had no significant effect on the encounter process leading to perceived experiential value; however, patient’s age had significant influence on the encounter process.

Research limitations/implications

This study empirically establishes a need to understand patient’s pre-encounter value needs, which fundamentally influence the patient-doctor encounter process and their perceived experiential value. However, the research only focused on the patient, which could limit the findings considering the multi-actors involved in the service delivery.

Practical implications

Creating value with patients suggests a need for providers to understand patient value needs or goals and adopt an approach to engage in a holistic manner that would result in positive experiences. This would empower and increase confidence of patients in consultations.

Originality/value

Using a quantitative research approach, this research engages in a highly focused investigation of the influence of patient’s pre-encounter value needs on key elements of the patient–doctor encounter process, which has received limited attention in the extant literature. The study also furthers our understanding of the effects of fundamental patient characteristics on encounter process and how this influence actor perceived experiential value.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kofi Osei-Frimpong

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on patient participatory behaviours in co-creation of value drawing from the perspective of self-determination…

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1474

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on patient participatory behaviours in co-creation of value drawing from the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT) focussing on motivation in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is proposed to suggest the influence of the various motivation types on a patient’s participatory behaviours drawing from SDT. Following survey design approach, data collected from 345 outpatients from a quasi-government health facility in Accra, Ghana are examined through structural equation modelling using SmartPLS (v. 3.2.3).

Findings

The findings reveal that patient participatory behaviours are influenced by both controlled and autonomous regulations leading to value attainment. External regulation (a more controlled form of extrinsic motivation) and patient participation in clinical encounters have no significant relationship with a patient’s commitment to compliance with medical instructions. The results reveal patient compliance is largely driven by autonomous regulation as proposed by SDT. However, active patient participation in clinical encounters and commitment to compliance with medical instructions positively and significantly influences perceived value outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides empirical evidence in support of understanding patient participatory behaviours in healthcare service delivery by testing theoretically grounded hypotheses developed from SDT perspective. The study focussed on outpatients from one quasi-government health facility, which could limit the generalisation of the findings reported.

Practical implications

This study illustrates the need for service providers to understand participant’s needs and motivation during the service encounter. This is essential as the various types of motivation influence the nature of the participation throughout the process, which could help improve on the value outcomes from the service.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to service literature through the application of SDT to explain patient participatory behaviours in healthcare service delivery, production and value outcomes. From a theoretical perspective, the developed model integrates multiple research disciplines (e.g. SDT, participatory behaviours, and value co-creation) and extends research on patient integration, participation, and compliance.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Kofi Osei-Frimpong

Through the lens of self-determination theory (SDT), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of autonomous and controlled motivational regulations in driving…

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1302

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of self-determination theory (SDT), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of autonomous and controlled motivational regulations in driving consumer participation in social brand engagement (SBE) practices. In addition, the moderating effects of cognitive effort and consumer demographic variables (age and gender) are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is tested by employing a quantitative survey design consisting of 832 consumers with prior experience in engaging with brands on social media. The respondents were conveniently interviewed using online questionnaire. The model estimation was done through structural equation modelling with AMOS 23.0.

Findings

The findings indicate that intrinsic, integrated, introjected and external motivational regulations significantly influence consumer participation in SBE activities, whereas identified regulation does not. Furthermore, while age and gender presented mixed interaction effects on the paths examined, cognitive effort does not moderate the influence of autonomous and controlled motivational regulations on SBE participation.

Research limitations/implications

This study employed a cross-sectional survey to explore consumer motivation and cognitive effort in SBE practices. As an exploratory study, the findings may be limited and not conclusive, which could limit the generalisation of the results reported.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates a need for retailing managers to understand customers’ varying intentions or needs in participating in online SBE activities As a result, retail managers need to adopt social media strategies that could elicit interest and curiosity on the part of the customer to excite them to participate in the brand social interactions.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the conceptual understanding of SBE through the application of SDT, and contends that cognitive effort does not moderate consumer participation in SBE practices. Also, the mixed findings resulting from the moderation test of age and gender sheds light on specific types of regulated motivations that are either moderated or not in relation to these demographic variables.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Kofi Osei-Frimpong, Graeme McLean and Samuel Famiyeh

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on social media brand engagement (SMBE) practices by exploring the impact of consumer brand knowledge, perceived…

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1990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on social media brand engagement (SMBE) practices by exploring the impact of consumer brand knowledge, perceived social pressure, perceived social relatedness (PSR) and the role of brand trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is proposed to suggest the influence of consumer-level antecedents and moderators of SMBE. Following a survey design approach, data collected from 687 respondents on Facebook are examined through structural equation modelling using AMOS 23.0.

Findings

The findings reveal significant relationship between the examined antecedents (brand knowledge, perceived social pressure and brand trust) and SMBE. Examination of the moderation role of PSR revealed significant interaction effects on the relationship between brand knowledge and SMBE, as well as perceived social pressure and SMBE. The findings also suggest a lack of interaction effect of PSR on the relationship between brand trust and SMBE.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides empirical evidence in support of understanding SMBE practices by testing theoretically grounded hypotheses. The study focussed on technologically savvy respondents and only Facebook users in Ghana, which could limit the generalisation of the findings reported.

Practical implications

This study illustrates a need for managers to integrate multi-communication channels to enhance brand interactions and engagements. Firms must also adopt strategies that would enhance the sharing of interesting information about their brands on their social media platforms to attract others through customer networks.

Originality/value

The conceptualization of SMBE in this study zooms out our understanding of online SMBE by examining pertinent variables that drive or moderate consumer participation in SMBE activities. The integration of these variables brings out new empirical understanding and extends our knowledge on SMBE.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Kofi Osei-Frimpong, Alan Wilson and Nana Owusu-Frimpong

The purpose of this paper is to investigate value co-creation processes from the focal dyad of the patient and the physician and how their experiences in the consulting…

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1623

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate value co-creation processes from the focal dyad of the patient and the physician and how their experiences in the consulting room affect the value that is created.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews incorporating the critical incident technique (CIT) were conducted with 8 doctors and 24 outpatients in selected hospitals in Ghana, exploring their experiences during their encounter in the service delivery impacting on the value creating healthcare opportunities. An abductive and thematic analytical approach was used to identify 76 useable critical incidents that had clear consequences on both the outcome of the service and the service experiences of the patient.

Findings

The study reveals three critical areas needed to support the value co-creation process and respective elements or activities to be considered during the service encounter. The critical areas comprise of the social context, beliefs and perceptions, and partnership between the focal dyad. The findings also suggests that patients do not consider “getting well” as the only value that they seek, but also the total experiences they go through in the consulting room. Also some physicians find it difficult to accept the recent changes in the patients’ behaviour and attitudes, resulting in knowledge conflict that adversely affects actors’ experiences in the consulting room.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered only one of the many professionals in the healthcare delivery, which may affect the true value perceptions of the patient.

Practical implications

The study provides service providers understanding of the processes that influence the patients’ experiences and value creation and the changing trends in the patient’s attitudes. The findings suggest a need for providers to take a holistic view of the service delivery and consider the critical areas, which could impact on the overall service outcomes.

Originality/value

This study extends the research on CIT to exploring the value co-creating processes in the healthcare setting. This also provides clarity in understanding the interdependence of the two actors and how this is managed as a resource in the value co-creation process at the micro level.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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