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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Sarah Beatson Nartey, Kofi A. Osei and Emmanuel Sarpong-Kumankoma

The purpose of this paper is to provide a total factor productivity index for the African banking industry. It also investigates the impact of some internal and external…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a total factor productivity index for the African banking industry. It also investigates the impact of some internal and external determinants affecting bank productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The biennial Malmquist productivity index and various regression models (ordinary least squares, Tobit and truncated bootstrapped regression) are employed in analyzing data from 120 banks in 24 African countries from 2007 to 2012.

Findings

The results indicate a general decline in productivity of banks in Africa, largely due to inadequate technological progress. State banks are found to be more productive than foreign and private banks. The regression analyses showed that non-executive directors, leverage, management quality, credit risk, competition and exchange rate have significant impact on bank productivity, but ownership and CEO-duality do not.

Practical implications

The results have implications for management of banks, governments and regulators. It shows the need for policy and investments that improve state-of-the art technology. The findings also seem to suggest poor management practices in input usage, especially in operational management, as well as costs emanating from non-interest sources. Bank managers need to address these deficiencies to improve productivity in African banking markets.

Originality/value

A major contribution of this paper is the productivity index provided for the African banking industry. This study is also the first to apply the biennial Malmquist to analyze productivity in the African banking industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Charles K.D. Adjasi, Nicholas B. Biekpe and Kofi A. Osei

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between stock prices and exchange rate movement in seven African countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between stock prices and exchange rate movement in seven African countries.

Design/methodology/approach

It uses vector autoregressive (VAR) cointegration and impulse response analysis to determine the long‐ and short‐run linkages between stock prices and exchange rates.

Findings

Cointegration analyses indicate a long‐run relationship between stock prices and the exchange rate in Tunisia, where exchange rate depreciation drives down stock prices. A short‐run error‐correction model also shows similar results. Impulse response analyses for other countries show that stock returns in Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius and Nigeria reduce when induced by exchange rate shocks but increase in Egypt and South Africa. Shocks induced by either stock prices or the exchange rate are more protracted in Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius and Nigeria than in South Africa and Egypt.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies on Africa which tests for long‐run dynamics and impulse response shock dynamics within a VAR framework. Again unlike other studies it also concentrates on more countries in the sample.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Oscar Joseph Akotey, Kofi A. Osei and Albert Gemegah

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors which influence the demand for micro‐insurance services among the informal sector workers of Ghana who are quite…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors which influence the demand for micro‐insurance services among the informal sector workers of Ghana who are quite vulnerable to various risks in the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a quantitative technique based on primary data sampled randomly from 100 informal sector workers from four major market centers in Accra, Ghana. The probit regression model was used for the empirical investigation.

Findings

Empirical investigation using the probit model indicates that premium flexibility, income level and nodal agency are significant determinants of micro‐insurance demand. Insurance knowledge, expectation (trust) and marital status were also found to have positive and significant impact on the demand for micro insurance. Interestingly, the empirical analysis shows that formal education is not a significant determinant; rather one's level of insurance knowledge has a positive and significant impact on micro‐insurance demand.

Social implications

Insurers must consider the nature of the cash‐flow of informal workers in the design of premiums. The government must integrate micro insurance into its poverty reduction program.

Originality/value

The micro‐insurance market is very new and unresearched in Ghana. This foundational study is, therefore, very original and a most valuable guide to commercial insurance companies which want to venture into this huge untapped opportunity in the Ghanaian informal sector.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Godfred A. Bokpin, Anthony Q.Q. Aboagye and Kofi A. Osei

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which corporate managers alter their capital structure in response to risk exposures on the Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which corporate managers alter their capital structure in response to risk exposures on the Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE).

Design/methodology/approach

A panel data covering the period from 2002 to 2007 was employed under the framework of the seemingly unrelated regression approach.

Findings

The paper finds that the direction and magnitude of the impact of risk exposures depends on capital structure measurement variables; namely, financial leverage, debt ratio, or short‐term debt to equity. The paper also finds that corporate managers adjust their capital structure differently in response to different kinds of risk exposures namely business risk or financial risk. Specifically, operating risk, bankruptcy risk, and bankruptcy cost in addition to other firm level characteristics such as asset structure, firm size and profitability are found to be significant driving factors in shaping corporate financial policy on the GSE.

Originality/value

The main value of this paper is to analyze the relationship between risk exposures and corporate financial policy from a developing country perspective.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Zubeiru Salifu, Kofi A. Osei and Charles K.D. Adjasi

The purpose of this research is to examine the foreign exchange exposure of listed companies on the Ghana Stock Exchange over the period January 1999 to December 2004. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the foreign exchange exposure of listed companies on the Ghana Stock Exchange over the period January 1999 to December 2004. The research uses different exchange rate measures namely; the cedi to US dollar, the cedi to UK pound sterling, the cedi to the euro and a trade‐weighted exchange rate index to determine the degree of exposure.

Design/methodology/approach

The Jorion (1990) two‐factor model which regresses the return on a firm against changes in the exchange rate and return on the market is used to estimate the exchange rate exposure for the sample of twenty firms used in this study.

Findings

About 55 per cent of firms in the sample have a statistically significant exposure to the US dollar whilst 35 per cent are statistically exposed to the UK pound sterling. Sector specific exposure results show that the manufacturing and retail sectors are significantly exposed to the US dollar exchange rate risk. The financial sector did not show any risk exposure to any of the international currencies. The most dominant source of exchange rate risk exposure is the US dollar. Most firms are also negatively exposed to the cedi to US dollar exchange rate changes, implying that the cedi depreciation vis‐à‐vis the US dollar adversely affects firm returns.

Originality/value

The study reveals the extent of foreign exchange exposure of firms in Ghana and also adds to the limited body of empirical literature on exchange rate exposure of firms in Africa. Results of this study serve as a useful guide to corporate managers and investors on the degree of foreign exchange exposure and the need to effectively manage firm exposure.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Anthony Kyereboah‐Coleman and Kofi A. Osei

This paper aims to examine how selected governance indicators impact on performance measures of outreach and profitability in microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how selected governance indicators impact on performance measures of outreach and profitability in microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a quantitative approach based on both primary and secondary data from conveniently sampled 52 microfinance institutions. A panel data technique is employed as the key analytical framework.

Findings

It is shown that governance plays a critical role in the performance of MFIs and that the independence of the board and a clear separation of the positions of a CEO and board chairperson have a positive correlation with both performance measures.

Research limitations/implications

It would have been appropriate to have a larger number of MFIs for the study. This limitation however does not compromise on the validity of the conclusions based on the findings of the study.

Practical implications

In the context of multi‐dimensional and sometimes conflicting objectives facing MFIs, a clear balancing act of social objectives and institutional sustainability to ensure effective performance of MFIs is recommended.

Originality/value

Studies on governance and its relationship with firm behaviour is limited especially in Sub‐Saharan Africa. Its application in the microfinance sector with its peculiar characteristics is the added value of this paper.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Joshua Abor, Emmanuel Sarpong‐Kumankoma, Eme Fiawoyife and Kofi A. Osei

This paper aims to evaluate the effect of risk on the financial policy of emerging market firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the effect of risk on the financial policy of emerging market firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 34 emerging markets during a 17‐year period, 1990‐2006, a panel data model is employed for the analysis.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that firms with high probability of survival are likely to employ more debt. The level of risk exposure, particularly business risk is important in influencing the financial decisions of firms in emerging market economies. It is argued that since the use of debt increases firms' exposure to financial risk, firms with high business risk would shy away from using more debt. Also, finance providers in the financial market may not be interested in lending to firms with high business risk. This study also identified profitability, dividend, asset tangibility, growth opportunities, and GDP per capita as important determinants of the financial policy of emerging market firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extant literature by providing empirical evidence regarding the effect of risk on the financial policy of emerging market firms.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Charles K.D. Adjasi and Kofi A. Osei

This paper's purpose is to examine the nature and correlates of poverty in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's purpose is to examine the nature and correlates of poverty in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the most recently published household living standards survey; the paper computes poverty indicators using the Foster et al., and Theil's inequality indicators to examine the nature of poverty. It also does a qualitative analysis on the nature of poverty by examining access to social amenities by households. Finally, based on standard empirical literature the paper runs an ordinary least squares and a probit regression to determine the correlates of poverty.

Findings

Most households rely on wood fuel, do not have access to tap water and live in rooms rather than full apartments. Expenditure inequality is high and greater in the rural areas compared to the urban areas. Inequality within locations appears to be the main source of national inequality. A household is less likely to be poor if the head is educated, as well as if the household is urban based. Again, households with heads employed in the clerical, sales, services, and agricultural sectors are more likely to be poor compared with those employed in the administrative and managerial sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a static analysis of poverty; the absence of a panel household survey makes it difficult to examine the dynamics of poverty.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive and holistic examination of the nature of poverty in Ghana. It looks at poverty within various sectors of an economy by simultaneously examining the issues both from quantitative and qualitative perspectives

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Abstract

Details

Finance and Development in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-225-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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