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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Mahmoud Ibrahim Fallatah

Building on network theory, this study aims to examine how network resources and network knowledge utilization influence mobility within networks of knowledge workers

Abstract

Purpose

Building on network theory, this study aims to examine how network resources and network knowledge utilization influence mobility within networks of knowledge workers. Specifically, it examines how the availability of resources in a network and knowledge utilization, in a period impacts the structure of the focal network in the following period.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses data from the National Basketball Association to depict the mobility of knowledge workers in a network. Because of the nature of the dependent variable, the study used a conditional fixed-effects quasi-maximum-likelihood Poisson regression as an analytical methodology.

Findings

The study finds that network resources are partially significant in predicting knowledge workers’ mobility and that knowledge utilization of networks of knowledge workers in one period negatively affects networks’ structure in the following period.

Originality/value

The study advances our understanding of the knowledge workers’ mobility phenomenon by examining network-level factors that influence the mobility of knowledge workers. It addresses the issue from a different theoretical perspective that is rarely used in studies of knowledge workers, which mostly draw from the traditional human resource literature. Additionally, it contributes to the emerging literature of network dynamics by studying factors that affect network changes. The study also responds to the calls that advocate using sports data to examine organizational phenomena.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Petra M. Bosch‐Sijtsema, Virpi Ruohomäki and Matti Vartiainen

Knowledge work (KW) is a well‐researched topic. However, KW is difficult to measure and little consensus has been reached on elements that affect knowledge work

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge work (KW) is a well‐researched topic. However, KW is difficult to measure and little consensus has been reached on elements that affect knowledge work productivity on a team level. The current theories neglect teams working in distributed geographical areas. The purpose of the paper is to integrate recent literature on knowledge work productivity (KWP) in distributed teams and give an overview of the elements affecting it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of research performed in the field of knowledge work productivity. The authors integrate theories of different fields of management theory (knowledge management, intellectual capital and learning), and work and organizational psychology. This paper answers three questions: What is knowledge work? What is knowledge work productivity? Which elements hinder or enable knowledge work productivity in distributed teams of global technology companies?

Findings

The authors define the crucial elements that either hinder or enable KWP: team tasks, team structure and processes, the physical, virtual and social workspaces as well as organizational context. The paper presents an integrative model of KWP in distributed teams of global technology companies.

Practical implications

Distributed teams are common in global companies. By understanding the elements that affect KWP, companies can stimulate or decrease specific elements in order to improve productivity of their distributed knowledge workers.

Originality/value

This paper integrates theories from different disciplines in order to create an understanding about knowledge work and its productivity for further research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Steven Walczak

To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization.

Abstract

Purpose

To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The extant literature on the impact of organizational culture and its link to management structure is examined and used to develop a new knowledge sharing management structure. Roadblocks to implementing a new management structure and methods for overcoming these impediments are discussed. The efficacy of the proposed management structure is evaluated empirically by examining its effect on organizations that have implemented portions of the proposed structure.

Findings

The foundational ideas behind the proposed knowledge management organizational structure and the structure itself have been implemented in parts at various organizations located both in the USA and internationally. While the full management structure model has not been evaluated, the portions implemented in various organizations have enabled these organizations to assume leading roles in their respective industries.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure has not been fully implemented under controlled circumstances. The empirical evaluation is performed on portions of the proposed model, thus the full impact of the proposed management structure may well exceed the described benefits and additional structural‐shift roadblocks may limit the realization of the proposed benefits.

Practical implications

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure gives managers a practical way to approach cross organizational knowledge sharing, which is frequently identified as a theoretical benefit of knowledge management. Means for diminishing or circumventing recognized impediments to organizational change are described to further facilitate the implementation of the proposed cross‐organizational knowledge sharing structure.

Originality/value

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure is organized around knowledge‐based teams of knowledge workers, but further extends this concept to include larger knowledge groups to transform an organization into a knowledge‐based organization. If an organization's functional structure can be successfully transformed, then this enables the maximization of competitive advantage realized through knowledge management initiatives, more specifically through knowledge sharing. Upper level management, who are responsible for organizational change are the primary audience, though the principals described may be implemented through a more grass roots approach by lower level management.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Frederick P. Morgeson and Stephen E. Humphrey

The design of work has been shown to influence a host of attitudinal, behavioral, cognitive, well-being, and organizational outcomes. Despite its clear importance…

Abstract

The design of work has been shown to influence a host of attitudinal, behavioral, cognitive, well-being, and organizational outcomes. Despite its clear importance, scholarly interest in the topic has diminished over the past 20 years. Fortunately, a recent body of research has sought to reenergize research into work design by expanding our view of work design from a narrow set of motivational work features to one that incorporates broader social and contextual elements. In this chapter we seek to review the literature on work design and develop a framework that integrates both job and team design research. We begin by briefly reviewing the history of work design in order to provide needed historical context and illustrate the evolution of job and team design. We then define work design, particularly as it relates to incorporating job and team design elements and transitioning from a view of jobs to one of roles. Following this, we identify a comprehensive set of work design outcomes that provide the basis for understanding the impact that different work characteristics can have on individuals and teams. We then offer an extended discussion of our integrative model of work design, which includes three sources of work characteristics (task, social, and contextual) and the worker characteristics implied by these characteristics. Having defined the range of work and worker characteristics, we then discuss some of the fit and composition issues that arise when designing work, as well as discuss the mechanisms through which the work characteristics have their impact on outcomes. Finally, we discuss research into informal forms of work design.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Hettie S. Courtney, Ernelyn Navarro and Carrie A. O'Hare

This paper aims to explain the dynamics of the five dimensional Dynamic Organic Transformational (D.O.T.) Team Model for knowledgeworkers to use in achieving high performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the dynamics of the five dimensional Dynamic Organic Transformational (D.O.T.) Team Model for knowledgeworkers to use in achieving high performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The D.O.T. Team Model is a dynamic team model developed to integrate and expand key concepts from open systems – contingency and dynamic congruence, transformational leadership, and learning organizations. The five dimensions of the D.O.T. Team Model consist of purpose, people, partnerships, process, and performance. The D.O.T. Team Model is most applicable where subjective measures are used for high performing teams. This model transcends the existing team performance theory and provides a basis for future researchers to build onto the continuing evolutionary changes in team performance.

Findings

The D.O.T. Team Model is a comprehensive and holistic approach for knowledgeworkers to achieve high performance. This model is grounded in theory and by applying the five dimensions (purpose, people, partnerships, process, and performance) this model enables optimum fit with a high‐performance team's organization and environments – allowing knowledgeworker members to effectively respond to dynamic changes and enhance its team and organizational performance.

Practical implications

The article is particularly relevant to practicing knowledgeworker leaders and team members that operate in a dynamic environment requiring a high‐performance team that can rapidly adapt and respond to change. The D.O.T. Team Model creates an understanding of the organizational and environmental dynamics necessary to achieve a high‐performance team capable of operating in this dynamic environment.

Originality/value

Practitioners will find the information in the article extremely useful in helping to understand how the D.O.T. Team Model can assist them in creating the proper fit with a high‐performance team's organization and environment. The significance of the D.O.T. Team Model was demonstrated by two highly‐recognized teams from both the public and private sectors whose performance philosophy mirrors the dimensions of the D.O.T. Team Model.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Patricia B. Scott

To move beyond the literature definitions of knowledge work to provide insight into knowledge workers' identity within the organization.

Abstract

Purpose

To move beyond the literature definitions of knowledge work to provide insight into knowledge workers' identity within the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

For knowledge workers, the need to identify themselves as part of a collective within their work environment is important due to the fact that they function in an organizational environment where they do not have the benefit of a traditional, formal bureaucratic structure. By using a combination of network analysis and semantic network analysis, it was possible to gain a clearer understanding of who knowledge workers are and how their interaction creates a sense of identity among these workers, even in a flexible organizational environment.

Findings

Knowledge workers see themselves somewhat differently from what the literature predicts. They do engage in interaction to fulfill task needs as well as social needs, are well connected beyond their focal workgroup, and their interaction leads to a shared meaning and identity across this otherwise rather disparate and autonomous group of workers.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is that communication events did not take into account the quality of the interaction. Future studies should include this aspect.

Originality/value

Perhaps by redefining what one feels is known about the elements of knowledge work and the organizational environment in which they work, and by pairing that knowledge with the communication network of these individuals, one can continue to explore both the essential essence and complexity of this new worker so that management of this worker can be optimized.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Mahmoud Mohammad Migdadi

The purpose of this paper is to, first, investigate the cultural attributes of organizations that may have an effect on knowledge‐related activities. Second, to build a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to, first, investigate the cultural attributes of organizations that may have an effect on knowledge‐related activities. Second, to build a case based on the literatures of knowledge management and learning which suggests that the phenomenon of cooperative learning may serve as an indicator of the existence of knowledge‐related activities such as knowledge creation and knowledge exchange. Finally, the paper seeks a better understanding of the linkages between these attributes and individual characteristics related to the development and transfer of knowledge throughout the enterprise, and ultimately, the organization's work products.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this study consists of two phases: first, development of a conceptual model based on the literature. Second, the hypothesized research model is presented and empirically tested by utilizing multiple regression analysis and simple regression analysis to investigate the climate of organizations, in order to understand the linkage between a set of organizational and individual characteristics and knowledge‐related activities found in cooperative learning groups and the resulting work outcomes. Data were collected from teams of information systems (IS) knowledge workers based at the information technology centers located in Jordanian universities. In total, 152 IS professionals from 15 system development teams across 12 universities participated in this study.

Findings

The survey instrument was shown to be both reliable and valid. Pertinent statistical analyses were then performed. The overall results from the empirical assessment were positive, thus reflecting the appropriateness of the proposed research model and hypotheses.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have implications for both academicians and managers who are interested in better understanding the nature of knowledge creation and knowledge exchange, as well as better understanding how one might prescriptively facilitate increased levels of knowledge creation and dissemination, organizational learning, and employee performance and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study is probably one of the first to hypothesize a research model that integrates organizational climate, knowledge processes, cooperative learning and knowledge outcomes, then empirically investigate the relationships between these constructs.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Weixiao Guo, Chenjing Gan and Duanxu Wang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the mobility of team members affects team creativity in knowledge-worker teams and the mediating role of team transactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the mobility of team members affects team creativity in knowledge-worker teams and the mediating role of team transactive memory system (TMS) and team creative efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple surveys were conducted on team leaders and members in knowledge-worker teams in China. A total of 94 teams were analyzed by adopting the confirmatory factor analyses, hierarchical regression analysis and bootstrap analysis method.

Findings

The results show that frequent team member mobility is negatively related to a knowledge-worker team's creativity, and the relationship is mediated by team TMS and creative efficacy.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a deeper understanding of how the mobility of team members affects team creativity in knowledge-worker teams by exploring the underlying mechanisms from the perspective of team cognition. Specifically, team TMS and creative efficacy mediate the relationship between team member mobility and team creativity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Pasi Pyöriä

The paper aims to serve as a reminder of the fact that creating a strong atmosphere of trust and longevity in employee relations is ultimately the most robust route to

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to serve as a reminder of the fact that creating a strong atmosphere of trust and longevity in employee relations is ultimately the most robust route to maintaining a sustainable competitive edge.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to a literature review, empirical evidence is drawn from qualitative interview data. The research setting covers five distinct business organizations representing technology industries and knowledge‐intensive business services.

Findings

The paper indicates that even in knowledge‐intensive firms a good team spirit and skilful management remain more important than the use of the latest technology. Furthermore, it is maintained that the role of information technology in supporting the decision‐making process in knowledge work is often very much overemphasized. However, modern information technology continues the long trend of the automation and mechanization of work and, if used properly, it can indirectly contribute to creating more space for interpersonal interaction by eliminating routine work.

Originality/value

The paper encourages practical managers to focus more on people than on technology.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

James D. Hess and Arnold C. Bacigalupo

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or

Abstract

Purpose

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or services at the lowest possible cost in a rapidly changing environment. This paper aims to start with the identification of the complexities of managing the knowledge‐based organization, using emotional intelligence to balance the interests of the individual and organization, and it may also be redefined as an organizational development process rather than an outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to be effective the knowledge‐based leader must possess the characteristics most often associated with the description of emotional intelligence and must also be effective at injecting these same characteristics throughout the organization. Utilizing the premises of Stewart's intellectual economy and adapting the work of Buckingham and Coffman to the knowledge‐based organization, a series of questions is outlined to assist leaders, managers and workers in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness and the utilization of emotional intelligence as an organizational development process.

Findings

Knowledge‐based organizations may benefit from the utilization of behaviors most often attributed to emotional intelligence, and emotional intelligence may be redefined as a process rather than an outcome for organizational development.

Originality/value

The knowledge working environment must utilize innovative processes to maintain the engagement and effectiveness of the workforce. Applying emotional intelligence as an organizational development process rather than an outcome, it becomes a strategy for the development of the individual and the organization concurrently rather than treating them as opposing interests.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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