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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2021

Gunae Choi and Se Ho Cho

The purpose of this paper is to examine firms’ knowledge-sourcing behavior in green technology development with respect to the home country’s market- vs nonmarket…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine firms’ knowledge-sourcing behavior in green technology development with respect to the home country’s market- vs nonmarket environmental policy stringency.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper empirically analyzes the effects of market and nonmarket environmental policy stringency on firms’ knowledge sourcing activity with patent data from OECD countries during 1991–2010, across five categories of green technologies.

Findings

When a nation establishes more stringent market environmental policies, firms likely source more international knowledge rather than domestic knowledge about green technology, up to a point. After that level, this balance shifts (inverted U-shaped curve) due to the risks associated with greater investment costs and commerciality. Nonmarket environmental policies instead should exhibit a positive, linear relationship with international relative to domestic knowledge sourcing. This study also reveals the dynamic roles of a firm’s green technological capability with market-based environmental policy stringency and a substitutive role of the capability with nonmarket-based environmental policy stringency.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows the effect of market and nonmarket environmental policy stringency on firms’ knowledge sourcing. The findings provide meaningful implications for policymakers regarding the optimal levels of market and nonmarket environmental policy stringency that will enhance their countries’ green technology development.

Originality/value

This paper enriches the literature of environmental policy and knowledge sourcing and offers the direction of future research of how environmental policy stringency influences a firm’s knowledge sourcing for green technology development.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Anis Khedhaouria and Arshad Jamal

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate motivations of team members to source knowledge and how the sourced knowledge increases their reuse and creation outcomes.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate motivations of team members to source knowledge and how the sourced knowledge increases their reuse and creation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A model based on knowledge sourcing perspective is proposed and tested to link knowledge sourcing methods in teams to their performance outcomes. The hypotheses are tested on data collected from a survey of 341 project teams.

Findings

The findings show the critical role of team members’ learning orientation in increasing knowledge sourcing, reuse and creation; group knowledge sourcing and repositories are more appropriate to increase knowledge reuse; the Internet is more effective to increase knowledge creation; and knowledge reuse increases knowledge creation among team members with a strong learning orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies can replicate the model presented in this paper and introduce group characteristics to improve its explanatory power. Also, use of self-reported measures in data collection may lead to biases; future research should collate different measures longitudinally or use separate primary and secondary observations.

Practical implications

Team leaders should enhance team effectiveness by ensuring diversity of knowledge and skills. Current research emphasizes that team leaders can integrate a crowdsourcing or “users as co-creators” approach to increase knowledge creation by team members. Team members’ learning orientation can be increased by promoting a climate that encourages open discussion of problems, mistakes and errors.

Originality/value

This research highlights that knowledge sourcing methods produce different performance outcomes regarding knowledge reuse and creation. These insights can be useful to team leaders and researchers to better understand what motivates team members to source knowledge and how it increases their reuse and creation outcomes.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Anis Khedhaouria and Vincent Ribiere

In a knowledge economy where innovation is a way for an organization to gain a competitive advantage, team creativity becomes an important factor of success. This paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

In a knowledge economy where innovation is a way for an organization to gain a competitive advantage, team creativity becomes an important factor of success. This paper aims to look at how a team's creativity is influenced by the degree of the team's knowledge sourcing.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed and tested to assess the influence of four main antecedents of team knowledge sourcing and creativity: learning orientation, intellectual demands, risk aversion, and relational capital. The research model is tested using PLSPM.

Findings

The findings show the significant influence of all the independent variables, but more particularly the strong influence of learning orientation on team knowledge sourcing and on team creativity.

Research limitations/implications

Team creativity was examined as team member perceptions of the creative processes in the team task. Data were gathered from graduate students working in a team on an e‐commerce development project. The data set was relatively small (148). Despite these limitations, the initial findings show some interesting patterns that will be worth investigating on a larger scale and in various environments.

Practical implications

The results provide considerable support for the idea that knowledge sourcing and the learning orientation of the team members can play an important role in supporting team creativity.

Originality/value

This research adapts the construct of knowledge sourcing from Gray and Meister to the team level of analysis. It conceptualizes the perspective that individually held knowledge influences creativity primarily through the process of knowledge sourcing (internal and external) at the team level.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 20 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Tong Che, Zijing Wu, Yaoyu Wang and Rui Yang

Innovation is the combination of idea generation and idea implementation. Sourcing relevant and credible external knowledge is critical for individuals to generate new…

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Abstract

Purpose

Innovation is the combination of idea generation and idea implementation. Sourcing relevant and credible external knowledge is critical for individuals to generate new feasible ideas and reduce the uncertainty of implementation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of knowledge sourcing on employee’s innovations behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected by paper-based survey in four Chinese companies’ R&D departments and consisted of 569 valid responses. Structure equitation modeling method was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that knowledge sourcing, which is formatively conceptualized by tacit knowledge sourcing and explicit knowledge sourcing, significantly influences employee’s innovation behavior. In particular, the direct effect of knowledge sourcing is fully mediated by task-efficacy. Furthermore, the effects of knowledge sourcing are contingent upon information transparency.

Originality/value

This study not only contributes to knowledge sourcing literature by investigating knowledge sourcing from idea generation and idea implementation perspectives, but also is of importance to knowledge management research by demonstrating the moderating effects of information transparency.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Timothy G. Hawkins, Mark E. Nissen and Rene G. Rendon

Knowledge-based services (KBS) comprise a major portion of services acquired by public organizations. However, their procurement is not well managed; consequently…

Abstract

Knowledge-based services (KBS) comprise a major portion of services acquired by public organizations. However, their procurement is not well managed; consequently, inefficiencies abound. Therefore, this study explores whether and how KBS can be sourced more efficiently by examining best practices and precepts from knowledge management theory. A spend analysis of one agencyʼs spend is used to identify the types of KBS procured. Interviews from 12 cases are then used to identify best practices and cost drivers in sourcing KBS. Twenty one recommendations for improving efficiency in sourcing KBS are offered. The findings suggest that potential is available from demand reduction strategies, and that public policy governing the procurement of knowledge is needed. The research concludes with theoretical implications and suggestions for future research.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Alessandra Perri and Grazia D. Santangelo

Multinational corporations (MNCs) have increasingly sourced knowledge across borders, and foreign subsidiaries operations have played a critical role in MNC international…

Abstract

Multinational corporations (MNCs) have increasingly sourced knowledge across borders, and foreign subsidiaries operations have played a critical role in MNC international knowledge sourcing strategies. The growing responsibility of foreign subsidiaries has paralleled an interest on the geography of this phenomenon by international business and international management scholars. In this chapter, we review this research. In addition, based on recent research in economics and management drawing on economic geography and innovation studies, we highlight possible avenues of research to enrich our understanding of the geographical aspects of international knowledge sourcing. In particular, we suggest three lines of research opportunities. A first opportunity relates to the explicit consideration of distance and border effects. A further research opportunity arises from investigating the geographical distance of heterogeneous host country knowledge sources from the foreign subsidiary. A final research opportunity we discuss is about the contribution of heterogeneous host country knowledge sources to the variety of knowledge developed by the foreign subsidiary.

Details

Distance in International Business: Concept, Cost and Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-718-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2011

Torben Pedersen, Christine Soo and Timothy M. Devinney

This research examines the differential impact of the importance of internally and externally sourced information and knowledge and their relationship to absorptive…

Abstract

This research examines the differential impact of the importance of internally and externally sourced information and knowledge and their relationship to absorptive capacity and firm performance. In addition, this analysis deals directly with the unobservable heterogeneity amongst firms that is generally viewed as the raison d'être for a unique resource-based perspective of organizational performance. Latent class, finite mixture regression models are used that show that a single model relating knowledge sourcing, absorptive capacity and firm performance is inadequate in explaining even a minor portion of the variation which is seen between firms.

Details

Dynamics of Globalization: Location-Specific Advantages or Liabilities of Foreignness?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-991-3

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2016

Ulf Andersson, Suma Athreye and Georgios Batsakis

We argue that a foreign-based R&D subsidiary of a multinational enterprise (MNE) can potentially source knowledge from three diverse knowledge networks, namely (i…

Abstract

We argue that a foreign-based R&D subsidiary of a multinational enterprise (MNE) can potentially source knowledge from three diverse knowledge networks, namely (i) external knowledge network of the home country, (ii) external knowledge network of the host country, and (iii) internal (MNE) knowledge network. Drawing on the relative costs and benefits associated with the process of synergistic knowledge, this study examines whether a substitutive or a complementary relationship exists when two of the aforementioned networks collaborate in order to generate new knowledge at the subsidiary level. Our study’s sample is based on a survey questionnaire addressed to foreign-based R&D subsidiaries of Fortune 500 companies. We assess the existence of complementarity/substitutability using the “production function approach.” Our results indicate that a complementary relationship exists between external knowledge network of the host and the home country, as well as between external knowledge network of the host country and internal knowledge network. On the other hand, external knowledge network of the home country and internal knowledge network form a substitutive relationship. Our study offers a more comprehensive view of the diverse sources/knowledge networks that R&D subsidiaries are sourcing knowledge from when compared to existing research. We also specify and account for the costs/benefits involved in knowledge sourcing and thereby detect possible substitution/complementarity between different sources of knowledge. So far, there has been limited to nonexistent research into the diversity of knowledge networks of R&D subsidiaries and the examination of potential substitutabilities and complementarities. Hence our empirical study contributes to the development of this particular research stream.

Details

Perspectives on Headquarters-subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-370-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Phakpoom Tippakoon, Nattapon Sang-Arun and Panisa Vishuphong

This study aims to examine the effects of external knowledge sourcing breadth and depth and explore whether there exists a complementary effect of breadth (or depth) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of external knowledge sourcing breadth and depth and explore whether there exists a complementary effect of breadth (or depth) and knowledge management (KM) capacity on firms’ innovation performance. Specifically, this study investigates the direct effects of breadth, depth and KM capacity on product and process innovation outcomes and tests whether complementary effects exist between breadth and KM capacity and between depth and KM capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the survey data of 302 manufacturing firms in Thailand and uses ordinal regression analysis to test the hypotheses empirically.

Findings

Regression results reveal that breadth and KM capacity are essential for enhancing firms' innovation performance, while depth is not significant. However, the authors do not find a significance of complementary effects between breadth and KM capacity and depth and KM capacity on firms’ innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study provides additional evidence to contribute to an ongoing debate on what knowledge sourcing strategies (breadth or depth) are significant for enhancing firms’ innovations. Moreover, it explores whether complementary effects between KM capacity and breadth/depth exist in determining firms' innovation performance, which is a neglected issue in the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Kristof Van Criekingen

Having a short throughput time for innovation projects, i.e. lead-time, can put firms in an advantageous position. The time that lapses between a project’s start and its…

Abstract

Purpose

Having a short throughput time for innovation projects, i.e. lead-time, can put firms in an advantageous position. The time that lapses between a project’s start and its completion, is influenced not only by the firm's internal capabilities but also by how the firm connects to external knowledge. This paper assesses the relation between knowledge sourcing and lead-time advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper empirically tests the relation between external knowledge sourcing and lead-time advantage based on firm level Community Innovation Survey (CIS) data.

Findings

I find that breadth and depth of the external knowledge sourcing are positively relating to lead-time advantage, albeit with diminishing returns. Investment into absorptive capacity, i.e. internal R&D, mitigates the diminishing of returns. Firms directing their external knowledge sourcing strategy toward consumers, suppliers and science are better able to capitalize on their innovations through lead-time advantages and firms also benefit from the special case of collaboration for product development.

Originality/value

The conceptual novelty of this research largely consists in empirically bringing together for the first time conceptualizations of external knowledge sourcing and the strategic use of lead-time. Given the prevalence of both concepts in the modern and fast changing economy, investigating this link is of great importance.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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