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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Hassanreza Zeinabadi

Knowledge-sharing is a valuable learning activity among teachers that leads to individual and collective professional development and contributes to students' learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge-sharing is a valuable learning activity among teachers that leads to individual and collective professional development and contributes to students' learning outcomes and school effectiveness. However, teachers are generally weak at knowledge-sharing and are often professionally isolated from colleagues. Regardless of the general and context-specific reasons for this weakness, researchers believe that principals' knowledge-sharing leadership (KSL) can influence teachers' knowledge-sharing behaviours (KSB). Nevertheless, little is known about how it can exert its impact. In addition, given the precedence of teachers' beliefs and intentions over their behaviours, the mechanism of this impact has not yet been investigated based on this sequence. This study seeks to investigate and compare this impact in the form of two competing models, including the theory of reasoned action and planned behaviour. Both models consider KSB due to teachers' beliefs and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 445 teachers completed an online form comprising two scales, including KSL and the knowledge-sharing belief-intention-behaviour. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The model hypothesising the impact of KSL on constructs of the theory of reasoned action had a better fit with the data. The direct and indirect relationships analysis showed that KSL directly affects two fundamental beliefs of teachers, including attitudes toward knowledge-sharing (ATKS) and subjective norms (SN). Also, these beliefs directly affected teachers' intentions and, ultimately, their KSB indirectly.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the school leadership literature. Further, it has supported the theory of reasoned action when the teacher's KSB is targeted. Although researchers previously have adopted this theory, they have focused more on containing constructs while neglecting principal-related external variables. Finally, this study provides insights into principals' training programs. While principals may try to be knowledge-sharing leaders through self-practising competencies, they should be purposefully trained.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Areej Alhogail

Sharing information security best practices between experts via knowledge management systems is valuable for improving information security practices, exchanging…

Abstract

Purpose

Sharing information security best practices between experts via knowledge management systems is valuable for improving information security practices, exchanging expertise, mitigating security risks, spreading knowledge, reducing costs and saving efforts. The purpose of this paper is developing a conceptual model to enhance the transfer of information security best practices between professionals in virtual communities through a Web-based knowledge management system to exchange their successful experience in handling different information security situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is validated by surveying 17 experts’ reviews on the correctness of the model’s structure and its related components through applying deep rich peer debriefing to test suitability. Quantitative data has been collected to achieve confirmatory results.

Findings

The resulting model incorporates five main components that support the formal mechanism for the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge: identification, classification, storage, validation and sharing. The success of knowledge sharing is highly dependent on the active collaboration of community members and highly influenced by motivation. Validating transferred knowledge is vital for ensuring the credibility of the system.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper is one of the first to highlight the role of integrating knowledge management to enhance the effective share and reuse of information security best practices knowledge. The research results can support researchers investigating the topic and generate trustworthy literature to guide information security virtual community developers.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Qiankun Wang and Qiao Shi

Knowledge sharing is an important way to improve the knowledge system of industrial construction, and the supervision mechanism is an important way to improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing is an important way to improve the knowledge system of industrial construction, and the supervision mechanism is an important way to improve the efficiency of knowledge sharing. However, some research works and practices indicate that the effects of applying the supervision mechanism are not obvious. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to propose an incentive method of knowledge sharing based on the supervision mechanism for promoting knowledge sharing among member enterprises in the industrial construction supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A basic incentive model and an optimization model of knowledge sharing in the industrial construction supply chain based on the supervision mechanism were developed via the principal–agent theory. Weighted coefficients of explicit and implicit knowledge sharing were introduced into the basic model, while the supervision reward was added into the basic model of the optimization model. The effect of these two models was compared and analyzed via numerical simulation.

Findings

The optimal incentive coefficient and effort level of knowledge sharing can be obtained by solving the two aforementioned models. The results of the comparison between the two models indicate that the introduction of a supervisory reward improved the effort level and expected earnings produced by knowledge sharing, but reduced the confirmed equal earnings of member enterprises in the industrial construction supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Mutual transformation between tacit and explicit knowledge was not considered, and supervisory costs were also not considered, in the estimation of the output of knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

The new models proposed by this study provide theoretical guidance for the design of knowledge sharing incentive measures in the industrial construction supply chain based on the supervision mechanism. The findings suggest that member enterprises should pay attention to the costs of knowledge sharing, in order to obtain more benefits.

Originality/value

This study introduced the weight coefficients of explicit and implicit knowledge sharing into a previous incentive model, proposed an incentive optimization model of knowledge sharing in the industrial construction supply chain based on a supervisory mechanism, and revealed the change rules of related variables that affect the model with the change in weight coefficients. The findings verify the effectiveness of introducing supervisory reward measures and extend the range of theoretical application.

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Shahnawaz Muhammed and Halil Zaim

This study aims to focus on a particular type of intra-organizational knowledge sharing that is referred to as peer knowledge sharing. This paper examines how peer…

2914

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on a particular type of intra-organizational knowledge sharing that is referred to as peer knowledge sharing. This paper examines how peer knowledge sharing impacts firms’ financial and innovation performance, and the mechanism through which such a relationship is realized. The study also evaluates the extent to which leadership support acts as a key antecedent to peer knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on social capital theory and a knowledge-based view of firms, a theoretical model and related hypotheses are presented for testing. A survey design methodology is used to collect data and test the model. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypothesized relationships based on data collected from 330 knowledge workers in various service-based organizations in Turkey.

Findings

The results indicate that the extent of employees’ engagement in knowledge sharing behavior with their peers and their managers’ leadership support exert a positive impact on organizations’ knowledge management success, which, in turn, can affect organizations’ innovation performance positively and, subsequently, their financial performance. Leadership support of the immediate manager is found to be an important factor that contributes to the respondent’s peer knowledge sharing behavior. The proposed model’s invariance testing between male and female respondents revealed that peer knowledge sharing’s contribution to knowledge management success may be different in the two groups.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to extant research on knowledge sharing by specifically focusing on peer knowledge sharing and reinforcing leadership support’s importance on knowledge sharing. The study also highlights the importance of knowledge management success as an important mediator necessary for linking individual knowledge management behaviors, such as peer knowledge sharing, with organizational performance.

Originality/value

Knowledge sharing is a topic of continuing interest for organizational researchers, yet limited empirical research has been conducted that links individual-level, intra-organizational knowledge sharing to organizational performance. This study examines this linkage and provides empirical support for this relationship, while simultaneously pointing to an important type of knowledge sharing that occurs within organizations, referred to as peer knowledge sharing.

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Ronald E. Rice, Marni Heinz and Ward van Zoonen

This study aims to take a public goods approach to understand relationships between collecting and contributing knowledge to an online knowledge sharing portal (KSP)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to take a public goods approach to understand relationships between collecting and contributing knowledge to an online knowledge sharing portal (KSP), mental model processing and outcomes at the individual and collective levels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reports on a survey (N = 602) among tax professionals, examining the perceived individual and collective benefits and costs associated with collecting and contributing knowledge. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Collecting and contributing knowledge led to considerable mental model processing of the knowledge. That in turn significantly influenced (primarily) individual and (some) collective costs and benefits. Results varied by the kinds of knowledge sharing. Whether directly from knowledge sharing, or mediated through mental modeling, the perceived costs and benefits may be internalized as an individual good rather than being interpreted at the collective level as a public good.

Research limitations/implications

The study is situated in the early stages of a wiki-type online KSP. A focus on the learning potential of the system could serve to draw in new users and contributors, heightening perceptions of the public goods dimension of a KSP.

Practical implications

A focus on the learning potential of the system could serve to draw in new users, and thus the number of subsequent contributors, heightening perceptions of the collective, public goods dimension of a KSP.

Originality/value

This study explores how knowledge sharing and mental model processing are directly and indirectly associated with individual and collective costs and benefits. As online knowledge sharing is both an individual and public good, costs and benefits must be considered from both perspectives.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Jason Snyder and Joo Eng Lee-Partridge

– The goal of this paper is to develop and test a model that explains information and communication channel (ICC) choice for knowledge sharing in work teams.

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Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to develop and test a model that explains information and communication channel (ICC) choice for knowledge sharing in work teams.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews relevant literature in information and knowledge sharing and communication channel choices to develop the four-layered model. From the four-layered model, an online questionnaire was developed to look at the ICCs that participants have available to them, the ICCs they actually use when sharing information in teams, and their motivations for making their ICC choices.

Findings

Although participants reported having access to a wide variety of ICCs, they tended to rely on face-to-face interactions, telephone and e-mail for sharing knowledge. In accordance with the four-layer model, participants reported that ICC choice was impacted by the type of knowledge being shared. In addition, ease of use, reliability, convenience, and the ability of the channel to document communications were all factors motivating ICC selection.

Research limitations/implications

The layered model provides a framework for further research to investigate the factors at the outer layers of the four-layered model and the interaction among the layers in affecting ICC choices.

Practical implications

The paper attempts to build a model that organizations can use as a guide to implementing strategies for information and knowledge sharing in teams.

Originality/value

This paper develops and partially tests a model to understand communication choices and information sharing. It provides a framework to examine “traditional” communication choices in the midst of the uproar of the availability of Web 2.0 technologies.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

S. Mahdi Hosseini and Peyman Akhavan

This paper aims to develop a model for selecting project team members. In this model, while knowledge sharing among individuals is maximized, the project costs and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a model for selecting project team members. In this model, while knowledge sharing among individuals is maximized, the project costs and the workload balance among employees are also optimized.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem of project team formation is formulated as a fuzzy multi-objective 0-1 integer programming model. Afterward, to deal with uncertainty in the decision-making on the candidates’ abilities and the project requirements, the fuzzy multi-objective chance-constrained programming approach is adopted. Finally, by combining the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II and the fuzzy simulation algorithms, a method is proposed to solve the problem.

Findings

The computational results of the proposed model in a case study of project team formation in a large Iranian company from the shipbuilding industry evidently demonstrated its effectiveness in providing Pareto-optimal solutions for the team composition.

Originality/value

Seemingly for the first time, this paper develops a model to optimize knowledge sharing and improve the project efficiency through the selection of appropriate project team members.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Shahla Ghobadi and John D'Ambra

This study aims to present a model that can be used for predicting effective knowledge sharing behaviors in cross‐functional project teams.

6907

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a model that can be used for predicting effective knowledge sharing behaviors in cross‐functional project teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawn from the extant literature, a coopetitive model of knowledge sharing is postulated. Data from 115 project managers are used to test the proposed model, using partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

The findings confirm the applicability and predictive power of the proposed model. Three dimensions of cross‐functional cooperation (cooperative task orientation, cooperative communication, and cooperative interpersonal relationships) were proved to directly drive effective knowledge sharing behaviors. The results show that competition affects effective knowledge sharing behaviors through influencing cooperative behaviors. In addition, this study shows that different dimensions of competition generate mixed impacts. Competition for tangible resources was found to positively affect cooperative communication of individuals, whereas competition for intangible resources (political competition) had negative impacts on cooperative communication and task orientations.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the extant literature by presenting a model that predicts effective knowledge sharing practices in cross‐functional projects. In addition, the results advance the current understanding of the concept and modeling of coopetitive knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

The proposed model of this study can be used by managers in order to facilitate problematic knowledge sharing processes within cross‐functional teams.

Originality/value

This study stands as one of the first attempts in providing a model that explains the forces behind effective knowledge sharing behaviors in cross‐functional teams. The model explores coopetition effect in a systematic way, which has not been previously studied.

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Ning Nan

The purpose of this paper is to explore effective incentive design that can address the information asymmetry in knowledge sharing processes and variability of the

3730

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore effective incentive design that can address the information asymmetry in knowledge sharing processes and variability of the intangible nature of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A principal‐agent model is first developed to formulate the asymmetry of information in knowledge sharing. Then, a set of optimal incentive solutions are derived from the principal‐agent model for knowledge types with specific levels of intangibility.

Findings

For knowledge with low level of intangibility (e.g. data), a target payment scheme is optimal. For knowledge with medium level of intangibility (e.g. expressible tacit knowledge), the optimal incentive solution is a function of management's ability to infer employees' effort from knowledge sharing results. For knowledge with high level of intangibility (e.g. inexpressible tacit knowledge), there is no payment scheme that can be derived from the principal‐agent model to encourage employees to share knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The principal‐agent model developed by this study complements the previous game theoretic models and market mechanisms in incentive design. The applicability of the findings can be improved by further empirical analysis.

Practical implications

There is no one‐size‐fits‐all incentive solution. The better the management can infer the effort level of employees from the reusability of the shared knowledge, the more effective the incentive schemes are. Knowledge management technologies can facilitate the application of the incentive design.

Originality/value

This paper explicitly addresses the problem of information asymmetry in incentive design. It aligns a schedule of incentive schemes with the classification of knowledge based on intangibility. The schedule of incentive schemes leads to better understanding of the value of technologies in supporting knowledge sharing activities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Deborah E. Swain and Patrick Roughen

This paper aims to describe how knowledge management (KM) in planning can support the sustainability of innovation in a hybrid, joint-use facility. The case study research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how knowledge management (KM) in planning can support the sustainability of innovation in a hybrid, joint-use facility. The case study research studies ImaginOn, a 15 year-old children’s library and theater for young people in Charlotte, NC.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used KM model analysis of qualitative data about tacit-explicit knowledge, intellectual capital (IC) and cognitive modes of collaboration. Both historic documents and primary data (from field study observations, interviews and a questionnaire) were analyzed for informal KM practices. Semi-structured and unstructured interview questions about innovation were used.

Findings

This study found evidence of tacit knowledge sharing, the growth of IC and the operationalization of collaboration to promote innovation. Although traditional KM terms were not used by staff, an integrated model framework demonstrates how KM practices promote innovation in planning joint-use facilities.

Practical implications

Although a study of a diverse cultural collaboration rather than two libraries, the KM practices that supported innovation and collaboration in this hybrid, joint-use facility might be applied to libraries. Future KM model research on joint-use organizations could investigate merged businesses, government programs and non-profits.

Social implications

The library and theater institutions in ImaginOn impact the lives of children and parents in meaningful ways that support community understanding, art, diversity and social interaction.

Originality/value

Research on joint-use libraries began in the 1960s. This case study provides unique model analysis of KM practices in a hybrid, joint-use facility (a library and theater). The innovative success and sustainability of ImaginOn illustrates the application of KM for strategic planning and aligning IC and business assets.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 142000