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Article

Ross Dawson

Knowledge organisations perform knowledge processes, using their primary resources of intellectual capital, and their key input of information. Their effectiveness in…

Abstract

Knowledge organisations perform knowledge processes, using their primary resources of intellectual capital, and their key input of information. Their effectiveness in performing these processes depends on their knowledge capabilities. In most cases these capabilities must be highly dynamic in order to respond to the changing environment of the organisation and resulting evolution of the required core knowledge processes of the organisation. All organisational development must be centred around developing those dynamic knowledge capabilities on an ongoing basis. The strategic capabilities of an organisation depend on its ability to process rapidly changing information and perspectives on the organisation and its business environment, so these are in fact high‐order knowledge capabilities. The development of organisational knowledge capabilities can be addressed most completely by considering the four fields of individual technology, organisational technology, individual skills and behaviours, and organisational skills and behaviours.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Ian Caddy

To date knowledge management within learning organizations has focussed upon maximizing possibilities to create knowledge while minimizing the chances of losing knowledge

Abstract

To date knowledge management within learning organizations has focussed upon maximizing possibilities to create knowledge while minimizing the chances of losing knowledge. However, knowledge management needs to consider a third option: dealing with orphan knowledge. There are situations where organizations forget things and repeat past mistakes. Do organizations really “unlearn” or just merely forget? In answering in the affirmative to this question, various scenarios are presented which may lead to creating orphan knowledge, knowledge forgotten, separated, or isolated within the organization. Orphan knowledge management needs to consider different knowledge types and their ease or otherwise of becoming orphaned. Orphan knowledge management should begin with a status assessment of the organization’s trueknowledge position”. Processes of orphan knowledge recovery or the development of strategies to minimize orphan knowledge should play a significant part in any organization’s strategic knowledge management plan. Within this context the role of the chief knowledge officer is seen as an important part of this strategic knowledge management plan.

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Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article

James D. Hess and Arnold C. Bacigalupo

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or

Abstract

Purpose

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or services at the lowest possible cost in a rapidly changing environment. This paper aims to start with the identification of the complexities of managing the knowledge‐based organization, using emotional intelligence to balance the interests of the individual and organization, and it may also be redefined as an organizational development process rather than an outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to be effective the knowledge‐based leader must possess the characteristics most often associated with the description of emotional intelligence and must also be effective at injecting these same characteristics throughout the organization. Utilizing the premises of Stewart's intellectual economy and adapting the work of Buckingham and Coffman to the knowledge‐based organization, a series of questions is outlined to assist leaders, managers and workers in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness and the utilization of emotional intelligence as an organizational development process.

Findings

Knowledge‐based organizations may benefit from the utilization of behaviors most often attributed to emotional intelligence, and emotional intelligence may be redefined as a process rather than an outcome for organizational development.

Originality/value

The knowledge working environment must utilize innovative processes to maintain the engagement and effectiveness of the workforce. Applying emotional intelligence as an organizational development process rather than an outcome, it becomes a strategy for the development of the individual and the organization concurrently rather than treating them as opposing interests.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article

Ahmad Al‐Athari and Mohamed Zairi

This paper is based on a study which examined the availability of knowledge management Systems in the Kuwaiti private and public sectors. The paper examines the actual…

Abstract

This paper is based on a study which examined the availability of knowledge management Systems in the Kuwaiti private and public sectors. The paper examines the actual situation, and how it could be improved to achieve organisational and national objectives through more effective training methods and more investment in human resources, geared towards enhancing and achieving effectiveness and efficiency. The study sample was five UK organisations (recognised as best practice organisations in their knowledge management systems) and 77 Kuwaiti organisations (40 government and 37 private ones). Interviews and questionnaires were used. The study reveals that the majority of respondents in both government and private sectors believe that their knowledge management system was very important to the development of their organisations, and that the most important sources of ideas come from employees’ and organisations’ existing knowledge. The most important method used by Kuwaiti organisations to facilitate the sharing of knowledge between employees, was found to include internal journals.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Critical Capabilities and Competencies for Knowledge Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-767-7

Abstract

Details

Translating Knowledge Management Visions into Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-763-9

Abstract

Details

Translating Knowledge Management Visions into Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-763-9

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Article

N. Mrinalini and Pradosh Nath

In the present context an organization competes in terms of its knowledge intensity. In this article we are focusing on human resource development, sustenance and…

Abstract

In the present context an organization competes in terms of its knowledge intensity. In this article we are focusing on human resource development, sustenance and enhancement as a process in non‐corporate research and technology organizations (RTOs), based on an international study on “Benchmarking the best practices for research and technology organizations”, coordinated by WAITRO. The basic function of these RTOs is to generate knowledge to effectively enhance their client’s competitive strength. A best RTO can be the one that provides a structure, which encourages people to take initiatives to generate new knowledge and effectively translate clients’ technological requirements into research results. For this, the RTO has to be a learning organization. To develop and sustain capabilities is essential for any RTO’s survival and growth. How best an organization performs depends upon its capability to build and enhance this knowledge base, i.e. the human capital. This in turn depends upon the way various activities are organized to generate human resource from the manpower they have.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article

Swee C. Goh

One of the major challenges an organization faces is to manage its knowledge assets. Increasingly, the use of knowledge is seen as a basis for competitive advantage. This…

Abstract

One of the major challenges an organization faces is to manage its knowledge assets. Increasingly, the use of knowledge is seen as a basis for competitive advantage. This paper explores the key factors that have been cited as significant influences on the ability to transfer knowledge, an important area of knowledge management. Each of these factors is discussed separately and then integrated into a conceptual framework to explain how effective knowledge transfer can be managed in an organization. A set of managerial implications, or a qualitative assessment approach, is also discussed. It is framed as organizational characteristics and managerial practices required to establish an effective knowledge transfer process in an organization. Conclusions are drawn about the complexity of managing knowledge transfer and the need to take a balanced approach to the process.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Tayyab Maqsood and Andrew D. Finegan

This paper aims to summarise a Doctor of Philosophy research study. The purpose is to provide a summary of the scope, literature review, main issues raised in the thesis…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarise a Doctor of Philosophy research study. The purpose is to provide a summary of the scope, literature review, main issues raised in the thesis, the application of a two phase action research methodology, key research findings and potential areas for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The research investigates the role of knowledge management (KM) in supporting innovation and learning in the construction industry. The research is carried out in two phases. Phase 1 employs a grounded theory methodology to develop and map out the current state of knowledge‐related activities being undertaken in two leading Australian construction organisations. This is developed into a model that shows that the segregation between three crucial components – people, process and technology – of an organisation is required to successfully carry out construction work. Phase 2 utilises soft system methodology (SSM) as a KM tool to identify the gap between organisations' internal and external knowledge sources. This gap is significant as it restricts the pull of knowledge from external knowledge sources.

Findings

This investigation provides a model to achieve KM initiatives through adoption of SSM. This results in an improvement in the integration of people, process and technology within an organisation, an increase in the capacity of the organisation to pull external knowledge, and thereby improve its own internal knowledge bank. All these improvements help an organisation to transform itself into a learning organisation that can continually adapt and innovate.

Practical implications

KM research is relatively new in the construction industry. This research has significantly added to the existing body of knowledge in the domain of KM by effectively linking KM with innovation and learning. This provides a strong case for employing KM in order to make innovation a regular phenomenon within the construction industry and encouraging organisations to transform themselves into learning organisations.

Originality/value

This paper provides practitioners with an insight into how KM can be applied in project management (PM)‐oriented organisations. Also the research explores an identified gap between PM research and practice, and argues that industry needs to effectively work in collaboration with knowledge sources found in academia. The paper also demonstrates that SSM can be used to create artefacts of knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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