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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Yongtae Park and Seonwoo Kim

The relationship between knowledge management (KM) and research and development (R&D) management is intrinsically close. However, little attention has been paid to the

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between knowledge management (KM) and research and development (R&D) management is intrinsically close. However, little attention has been paid to the development and implementation of KM systems for R&D organizations. The main objective of this current research is, from the perspective of evolutionary ecology, to suggest a framework of system design to link KM and R&D management.

Design/methodology/approach

The chronological profile of R&D management systems over the past few decades is reviewed and the salient features of respective generations are identified. Then, the list of requirements for KM systems is suggested for each generation.

Findings

Finds that these requirements constitute crucial variables for the design of KM systems and, as a whole, provide the building‐blocks for integrating R&D management and KM.

Originality/value

The proposed architecture is considered as a starting‐point and serves as a milestone in implementing KMS in accordance with the R&D characteristics of a particular firm.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Kerstin Kuyken

Knowledge management (KM) has become a key concern for companies which nowadays are constantly looking for better ways to assure knowledge sharing between their employees

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) has become a key concern for companies which nowadays are constantly looking for better ways to assure knowledge sharing between their employees. However, companies encounter several challenges arising from the fact that several generations share the same workplace and a big portion of today's employees are close to retirement. This article aims to focus on knowledge sharing between generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reviews the “generation” concept and its limitations, and introduces a new view on generations as “communities of knowledge”.

Findings

Companies have to find ways not only to assure knowledge transfer between generations, but also knowledge retention of the workers that are retiring. This requires a deeper understanding of the generations and their differentiated knowledge. Yet, today's dominant descriptions of generations (“baby‐boomers”, “generation X”, “generation Y”), do not appear to adequately take into account cultural, socio‐professional and individual factors.

Originality/value

The proposed change of paradigm allows a deeper comprehension of nuances that may exist within the same age group. In doing so, the article makes a contribution to the understanding of knowledge sharing in organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Esra Memili, Hanqing Chevy Fang and Dianne H.B. Welsh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the generational differences among publicly traded family firms in regards to value creation and value appropriation in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the generational differences among publicly traded family firms in regards to value creation and value appropriation in the innovation process by drawing upon the knowledge-based view (KBV) and family business literature with a focus on socioemotional wealth perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tests the hypotheses via longitudinal regression analyses based on 285 yearly cross-firm S & P 500 firm observations.

Findings

First, the authors found that family ownership with second or later generation’s majority exhibits lower levels of value creation capabilities compared to non-family firms, whereas there is no difference between those of the firms with family ownership with a first generation’s majority and non-family firms. Second, the authors also found that family owned firms with a first generation’s majority have higher value appropriation abilities compared to nonfamily firms, while there is no significant difference in value appropriation between the later generation family firms and non-family firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study help scholars, family business members, and investors better understand family involvement, and how it impacts firm performance through value creation and value appropriation.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the family business, innovation, and KBV literature in several ways. While previous family business studies drawing upon resource-based view and KBV often focus on the value creation in family governance, the authors investigate both value creation and value appropriation phases of innovation process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Ilka Griese, Doreén Pick and Michael Kleinaltenkamp

This study aims to present the conceptualization and measurement of knowledge generation competence (KGC) as the fundament for firm's internal knowledge generation

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present the conceptualization and measurement of knowledge generation competence (KGC) as the fundament for firm's internal knowledge generation. Furthermore, it seeks to assess different antecedents of a firm's KGC and its potential for improving a firm's innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by nationwide mail survey in the German automation and the consulting industry. The final sample consists of 110 respondents (response rate of 32.9 percent). The measurement model was tested by using structural equation modeling applying partial least squares (PLS) estimation. PLS was also used to investigate the relationships between KGC, its antecedents and innovativeness.

Findings

The findings support the conceptualization and measurement of knowledge generation competence (KGC). The included dimensions explained 47.6 percent of the variance of knowledge generation competence. Furthermore, most of the relationships included in the research model were supported by the empirical data.

Practical implications

The data suggest that firms which want to increase their innovativeness can develop their knowledge generation competence by providing learning orientation culture and investing in human resource practices.

Originality/value

The paper aids in uncovering the relationship between organizational learning, human resource practices, knowledge generation competence, and innovativeness of a firm.

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Valeria Kiisk and Mait Rungi

Based on the sample of the European information and communications technology (ICT) companies, this paper aims to identify which strategy of knowledge generation is most…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the sample of the European information and communications technology (ICT) companies, this paper aims to identify which strategy of knowledge generation is most beneficial for companies: internal knowledge development or absorption of knowledge external to the company through corporate acquisition or merger.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a longitudinal analysis of European ICT companies was conducted, contrasting internal knowledge creation, in the form of patent accumulation and research and development (R&D) efforts, with external learning through merger-and-acquisition (M&A) activities to uncover the best strategies for performance maximization.

Findings

Results suggest that the two knowledge generation strategies are not complementary and demonstrate only marginal impact on organizational performance. However, intriguing patterns in combining the two became apparent. It was found that patent accumulation improves learning achieved through M&A activities, while also acting as a protection against corporate takeover. At the same time, the internal knowledge generation strategy was found to have a negative impact on financial performance, with external knowledge generation demonstrating somewhat mixed results.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical insights into the patterns of internal and external knowledge generation activities. The two strategies were found not to be complementary, implying that companies must carefully choose their preferences.

Originality/value

This large-scale study tackles the interplay between internal and external knowledge generation strategies, which are mostly studied separately. It reveals new patterns in corporate acquisition and divestment strategies as sources of new knowledge. It also ties the knowledge paradigm to organizational performance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Haili Zhang, Xiaotang Zhang and Michael Song

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance and empirically tests the proposed model using data collected in the USA and China over three years.

Design/methodology/approach

To avoid common method bias and increase ability to draw causal effects of KM on performance, data were collected over three years. KM data were collected by survey; innovation speed data were collected in the following year; and sales growth and gross margin data were collected over the next three years. After merging the three data sets, the final empirical data used for this study contained data from 354 USA and 647 Chinese firms. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Sobel mediation tests were performed to test the mediating effects of innovation speed on the relationship between KM and performance.

Findings

Innovation speed has a U-shaped relationship with performance in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge generation has an inverted U-shaped relationship with innovation speed in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge dissemination increases innovation speed in US firms but not in Chinese firms. While knowledge application increases innovation speed in the US firms, it decreases innovation speed in Chinese firms.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to propose and empirically test the KM-innovation speed-performance relationship. This paper advances the KM literature by demonstrating that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge generation and innovation speed and that there is a U-shaped relationship between innovation speed and performance. In addition, this study contributed to the cross-national study of KM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Andrew Joy and Barry P. Haynes

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact the workplace can have on knowledge working for a multi‐generational workforce.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact the workplace can have on knowledge working for a multi‐generational workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study analysis is undertaken of Leeds City Council (LCC) workplace in the UK.

Findings

The findings from the study show that in the context of LCC there are some key differences between the generations regarding knowledge working preferences for formal/informal meeting spaces. In other aspects, such as knowledge sharing, the generations appear to agree on key aspects such as mentoring and team‐based working environments.

Practical implications

Corporate real estate managers can use the research findings to assist them in providing a range of workplace settings to enhance multi‐generational interaction.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in current research by evaluating workplace preferences based on generational differences.

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku, George Kofi Amoako and Desmond K. Kumi

This study aims to determine the impact of social media usage on university student’s academic performance in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the impact of social media usage on university student’s academic performance in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was used for the study. With the aid of a simple random sampling technique, quantitative data were obtained from 373 out of 400 respondents representing 93 per cent of volunteered participants. Data collected was analysed using structural equation modelling to establish the relationship among social media information, social media entertainment, social media innovation, social media knowledge generation and student performance.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that social media information, social media innovation and social media entertainment all had a significant positive influence on social media knowledge generation, which has wide learning and knowledge management implications. Also, the study indicated that information computer technology knowledge moderates the relationship between social media and student performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample taken was mainly cross-sectional in nature rendering the inference of causal relationships between the variables impossible. Future researchers should adopt a longitudinal research design to examine causality. Finally, the study was limited to only university students in Accra, Ghana. Future research can extend to a bigger student population and to other West African and African countries.

Practical implications

This paper will serve as a profitable source of information for managers and researchers who may embark on future research on social media and academic performance. The findings that social media information, innovation and entertainment can likewise enhance social media knowledge generation can help managers and university teachers to use the vehicle of innovation and entertainment to communicate knowledge.

Social implications

The findings of this study will help policymakers in education and other industries that engage the youth to realise the important factors that can make them get the best in the social media space.

Originality/value

Social media usage in academic performance is increasingly prevalent. However, little is known about how social media knowledge generation mediates between social media usage and academic performance and, furthermore, whether the information computer technology knowledge level of students moderates the relationship between social media knowledge generation and academic performance of university students in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly Ghana. Theoretically, the findings of this study provide clear research evidence to guide various investigations that can be done on the relationships of the variables under social media usage, knowledge generation and university student performance, which advances the diffusion of new knowledge.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Chih-Huei Ko, Sou-Chin Wu and Chien-Yu Chen

Numerous studies have examined individual attitudes and behaviors in both face-to-face (FTF) communication and computer-mediated communication (CMC). However, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies have examined individual attitudes and behaviors in both face-to-face (FTF) communication and computer-mediated communication (CMC). However, little research has focused on differences between FTF communication and CMC with respect to idea generation for new product development or on the role of their individual characteristics. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the influences of FTF, CMC and brand knowledge on idea generation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a 4 × 2 quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of four types of interactive groups (low and high level of FTF × low and high level of CMC) and brand knowledge (low and high) on novel and practical idea generation. Data from168 members of the Mondeo Motor Club in Taiwan were assessed.

Findings

Participants with more FTF interaction were more likely to generate novelty ideas than practicality ideas. In addition, participants with high brand knowledge produced more novel and practical ideas compared with participants with low brand knowledge. However, the empirical findings did not support the moderating role of brand knowledge in the relationship between interactive behaviors and idea generations.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are relevant for facilitating the “novelty” and “practicality” ideas in virtual brand communities. However, this research examined a single community, which may limit the generalizability of its results to other virtual communities.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on online idea generation from a consumer-to-consumer (C2C) interaction perspective. The results of this study can assist marketers to understand how C2C interactive behaviors differentiate the “novelty” and “practicality” ideas.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

John Salinas-Ávila, René Abreu-Ledón and Johnny Tamayo-Arias

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the relationships between the dimensions of intellectual capital (IC) and the generation of knowledge in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the relationships between the dimensions of intellectual capital (IC) and the generation of knowledge in public universities.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was developed and administered in Colombia. A total of 209 researchers participated in the study. Data were collected through IC measurements concerning the research mission of the universities. Scientific publications from the respondents and the citations received were taken as proxies for the generation of knowledge. To test the hypotheses, structural equation modeling was used.

Findings

Hypotheses proposing a positive association between the dimensions of IC, namely, human capital, structural capital, and relational capital, and the generation of knowledge were tested. The findings highlight that human capital is indirectly and positively related to the generation of knowledge through relational capital, as well as through the path of structural capital-relational capital.

Practical implications

The study suggests that directors of research at universities could improve the results of this activity by analyzing and understanding the dimensions of IC that contribute to the development of scientific capacities and the generation of knowledge.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that has examined the interrelationships between the dimensions of IC at universities and the generation of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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