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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Alexander John Heeren, Ajay S. Singh, Adam Zwickle, Tomas M. Koontz, Kristina M. Slagle and Anna C. McCreery

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of sustainability knowledge to pro-environmental behaviour. A common misperception is that unsustainable…

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2640

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of sustainability knowledge to pro-environmental behaviour. A common misperception is that unsustainable behaviours are largely driven by a lack of knowledge of the underlying societal costs and the contributing factors leading to environmental degradation. Such a perception assumes if individuals “only knew better” they would engage in more sustainable behaviours. The “knowledge deficit model” has been critiqued for not including social psychological research about how knowledge is incorporated into decision-making and its subsequent effect on human behaviour. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model has been used extensively to examine intention to engage in a variety of behaviours, therefore this model is applied to examine the effect knowledge has in predicting behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand these relationships, the authors examined the relationships between sustainability behaviours through an online survey of over 500 students at a large university in the USA.

Findings

Results indicate that knowledge had a significant, albeit weak, bivariate correlation with behaviour (r = 0.113, p < 0.001). However, when controlling for TPB variables (attitudes, norms and perceived behavioural control), knowledge was not a significant predictor of behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude with several implications to guide university sustainability programmes.

Originality/value

This study places sustainable knowledge in the context of other social psychological factors which also influence behaviour. The results show that as the students are educated about sustainability, fostering behaviour change will require education not only about how actions affect sustainability but also about social norms, attitudes towards sustainable behaviours and the level of self-efficacy in doing those behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Felicity Callard

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Nathalie Girard

The purpose of this paper was to build a review of the various management processes of this knowledge in this domain, with the aim of identifying research topics and…

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1108

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to build a review of the various management processes of this knowledge in this domain, with the aim of identifying research topics and perspectives for knowledge management (KM) within the boundaries between science and society. At the boundary between science and society, the development of agricultural systems is grounded in various innovation processes that are currently being challenged by sustainability issues. In particular, farmers’ knowledge is emphasized today in various reports and scientific studies as a way of designing more sustainable agricultural systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature analysis was performed on a database built from the Web of Science and 273 scientific article abstracts were qualitatively analyzed.

Findings

Four KM strategies on the basis of the objectives of these papers, the arguments used to justify the study of farmers’ knowledge (FK) and the position of the authors in relation to this knowledge were built. These strategies can be broken down as follows: assessing FK to improve it; documenting FK to capitalize or legitimize it in development processes; using FK as a resource for innovation; and facilitating the sharing of various sources of knowledge to increase the efficiency of development projects.

Research limitations/implications

Because the four KM strategies show a relative genericity, research perspectives for each of them, some of which were related to the KM community and some of which extended the focus on political, legal or sociological aspects of knowledge production processes at the boundary between science and society, were drawn.

Practical implications

The four categories of KM strategies revealed the importance of legitimization processes of practitioners’ knowledge when dealing with innovation at science–society boundaries, whereas such processes are often neglected by classical KM methodologies.

Social implications

This work questions the category of “practitioners’ knowledge”, stressing the need to go beyond the dichotomy between scientific and empirical knowledge and to recognize the hybrid nature of knowledge. It also shatters the myth that local knowledge is more sustainable than science-driven innovations, arguing for more KM efforts at the boundary between science and society.

Originality/value

Even if farmers’ knowledge has been used since the 1970s to promote more endogenous innovation processes as opposed to classical science-driven innovation processes, no review has yet been done of the use of farmers’ knowledge in the development of agricultural systems.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Alvin Patrick M. Valentin

This study aims to examine the applicability of an extended version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting pro-environmental behavior, specifically the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the applicability of an extended version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting pro-environmental behavior, specifically the purchase behavior (PB) of package-free bath products, among students in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a non-experimental survey research design, this study empirically tested an extended TPB model through structural equation modeling. The dataset was obtained through a survey of undergraduate students in three HEIs in the Philippines.

Findings

Environmental knowledge (EK) predicted attitudes toward purchasing package-free bath products. Attitudes, subjective norms and pro-environmental self-identity (PSI) predicted intention to purchase package-free bath products. Furthermore, the intention to purchase package-free bath products and perceived behavioral control predicted PB of the said item.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that the addition of EK and PSI to the TPB is applicable in predicting pro-environmental behavior, specifically the purchase of package-free bath products.

Practical implications

The results showed how HEIs can encourage their students to purchase package-free bath products.

Social implications

The results highlight how social and economic factors play a role in promoting or inhibiting pro-environmental behavior among HEI students.

Originality/value

The findings support the inclusion of EK and PSI to the TPB for an integrative model that aims to improve the prediction of the purchase of package-free bath products.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-968-7

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Ronald E. Rice, Stacy Rebich-Hespanha and Huiru (Jennifer) Zhu

The chapter reviews recent evidence of, and debates about, the integration of art, entertainment, and media in media portrayals (e.g., movies, photographs, theater, music…

Abstract

The chapter reviews recent evidence of, and debates about, the integration of art, entertainment, and media in media portrayals (e.g., movies, photographs, theater, music, performance art, museums, story-telling, modifications of an environmental space, social media, painting, comics, dance, videogames, etc.) of climate change based on three sources of data: 1) articles listed in academic reference databases and Google Scholar, 2) online sites, and 3) climate change news images. 1) Retrieved articles discuss both the potential and challenges of communicating about climate change through art, entertainment, and media. However, research is inconsistent on and in some cases is critical of the nature and extent of effects of art-based climate communication. 2) The Internet is a rich and diverse source of websites and videos about climate change. We analyzed 49 sites based on the art medium or form discussed, the primary content related to climate change, and the apparent goal of the site or video. The most frequent goals were promote action, collaboration, raise awareness, climate change communication, discussion, empowerment, reshape public perception, and engagement. 3) Based on the major themes and frames identified through content and cluster analysis of 350 images associated with 200 news articles from 11 US newspaper and magazine sources through late 2009, we summarize the theme of art and mass media representations of the environment, and how those are associated with the other major themes. We conclude by suggesting promising areas for future research on the intersection of art and science in communicating about climate change.

Details

Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-968-7

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Lauren Olson, Joseph Arvai and Laurie Thorp

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the state of knowledge of students and faculty on the Michigan State University (MSU) campus; identify…

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1901

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the state of knowledge of students and faculty on the Michigan State University (MSU) campus; identify relevant gaps in knowledge and misconceptions about recycling; and provide recommendations regarding how these gaps and misconceptions may be addressed through education and outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mental models analysis, the current state of knowledge possessed by students and faculty was compared with a comprehensive inventory of on‐campus recycling procedures and opportunities.

Findings

By combining data from individual mental models elicited from students and faculty members, an overall mental model that depicted the frequency with which subjects understood MSU‐specific recycling concepts was developed. This composite model, and the accompanying statistical analysis, revealed important gaps – on part of both students and faculty – in understanding for several key recycling concepts that are relevant to established campus‐based waste reduction practices.

Originality/value

The mental models approach, which to the authors' knowledge has yet to be applied to campus sustainability initiatives, provides program managers and outreach specialists with a constructive and transparent opportunity to develop and deploy program information that builds on existing knowledge while also meeting the new information needs of key stakeholders.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Susan Geertshuis

The purpose of this paper is to describe and evidence a means of improving decision making within a sustainable resource management context.

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1276

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and evidence a means of improving decision making within a sustainable resource management context.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of competencies required by effective decision makers is developed. Methods of improving decision making are reviewed and used to develop a continuing education programme that addressed each competency. Following piloting, 1,300 lay and professional decision makers are trained and assessed.

Findings

It is possible to capture the skills required of decision makers and to develop decision‐making performance within relatively short courses.

Practical implications

To be of any real value education for sustainability must not only increase awareness and knowledge but must also impact on decision making. The paper argues for an explicit consideration of decision making in learning design and describes the use of techniques that can be readily appropriated by others.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of training in decision making delivered to a wide range of practitioners. The paper also illustrates the contribution universities can make in working to improve sustainability outcomes through continuing education at a national level.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Dina Abbott and Gordon Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on…

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2247

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper draws on several strands within the context of climate change: knowledge and power; human engagement; the meaning of “lived experience” (and its association with “local/indigenous knowledge”); its capture through interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary inquiry; post-normal science; rationalist and public action approaches to policy and intervention. The paper combines these strands from their different literatures, previous work by the authors and interdisciplinary deliberation in a European climate change education project.

Findings

The case is made for taking account of lived experiences in climate change policy and intervention, and the dangers of not doing so. The paper, however, also identifies the challenge of establishing the validity of lived experience alongside forms of scientifically derived knowledge, and the practical challenge of capturing it in a form that is accessible to practitioners. It concludes by arguing that a public action approach to policy provides a better lens than the conventional rationalist approach to analyse the contested nature of climate science and the potential of lived experience to inform debates through active engagement.

Research limitations/implications

There has been no empirical study on climate change that addresses the research concerns. This would be necessary to forward the paper's agenda.

Practical implications

The paper makes a case for formalising evidence that is based on lived experience in policy making and intervention, and the approach that is needed.

Originality/value

The work develops the concept of lived experience in the context of climate change. Its public action theory of knowledge provides a novel means of analysing and meeting the challenge of diverse knowledge on climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Jesper Clement, Mette Skovgaard Andersen and Katherine O'Doherty Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of disagreement between companies and consumers with respect to misleading information and to make…

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1398

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of disagreement between companies and consumers with respect to misleading information and to make suggestions as to how the conflict might be resolved.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on qualitative research methods, the authors discuss possible grounds for controversies with respect to product information and present a possible framework, inspired by the work of Boltanski and Thévenot, for examining these controversies.

Findings

An analysis of arguments shows that consumer representatives and companies, not surprisingly, agree on general moral principles as, for instance, the importance of not lying about the product; however they tend to disagree about where the boundaries between acceptable and misleading information should be drawn in practice. The findings point to the fact that the differences might partly be explained by Boltanski and Thévenots' “orders of worth” and that this classification would seem to provide a fruitful tool for identifying the character and basis of differences of opinions regarding whether or not product information is deemed to be misleading and hence form the basis for a new tool in the management toolbox for testing potentially misleading information.

Research limitations/implications

The data behind the analysis are limited and retrieved in a Danish environment, for which reason more research should be carried out in order to broaden the perspectives of the research.

Practical implications

To reduce controversies the paper proposes a reciprocal recognition of the particular order of worth from which an assessment is made.

Originality/value

Qualitative methods, in this case the combination of qualitative interviews combined with an analysis of arguments, shed light on the core problem concerning misleading information.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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