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1 – 10 of over 20000
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Roknuzzaman and Katsuhiro Umemoto

The purpose of this paper is to examine how and to what extent knowledge management (KM) has been incorporated into the library and information science (LIS) curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how and to what extent knowledge management (KM) has been incorporated into the library and information science (LIS) curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted using an e‐mail questionnaire survey of LIS academics world‐wide who adopted KM education in their schools. Based on a preliminary survey of 600 LIS schools' homepages, a structured questionnaire is sent out to 106 LIS academics via e‐mail. In total, 58 filled‐in questionnaires are received, of which 57 are valid for analysis. The analysis follows a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches of research with a primary focus on qualitative analysis.

Findings

LIS has assimilated the core content of KM based on the combination of varying proportions of major perspectives and skill‐sets of KM with an emphasis on information management and information technology‐oriented courses. The study also finds that LIS has incorporated KM following a partial adoption process through mutual borrowing of knowledge between LIS and KM.

Research limitations/implications

Many LIS schools, especially from non‐English speaking countries, do not come under investigation due to their lack of web accessibility.

Practical implications

This paper reinforces the curriculum renovation of LIS with the incorporation of KM. It suggests a strong interdisciplinary collaboration with other disciplines having KM interests, and the adoption of a balanced approach to KM that would consider wider audiences and market demand.

Originality/value

The study presents the practical experiences of LIS academics who adopted KM education. The study also explores the concept of “mutual borrowing of knowledge” between LIS and KM.

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Lynn Ling Min Wee and Siew Ching Goy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial socialisation experiences, socio-economic factors, demographic characteristics and the financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial socialisation experiences, socio-economic factors, demographic characteristics and the financial knowledge of first year undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire, data were collected from a sample of 450 first year university students from both private and public universities. A multivariate regression method was adopted to examine the influence of financial socialisation among respondents of different ethnic groups and their social backgrounds on the individual's financial knowledge.

Findings

The findings indicate that: firstly, financial knowledge is low among first-year university students in Sarawak. Secondly, male respondents outperform female counterparts in terms of financial knowledge. Thirdly, parental financial socialisation remains the main source of financial knowledge among the students. Fourthly, there are significant differences in financial knowledge across ethnic groups.

Research limitations/implications

It is paramount to implement financial education programmes to elevate the financial literacy for both youth and parents since parents remain the primary source of financial socialisation for young adults.

Practical implications

The study suggests that financial knowledge varies according to gender and ethnicity. Hence, financial education programmes should be designed to accommodate the differences between groups based on ethnicity and gender to achieve the best outcome.

Originality/value

This is the first study that draws a representative sample of university students in Sarawak that examines the effects of ethnicity, gender and parental financial socialisation on financial knowledge among first year university students.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Alexander Serenko and Nick Bontis

– The purpose of this paper is to: investigate the current state of intellectual capital (IC) as an academic discipline, and explore the impact of IC on the state of practice.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: investigate the current state of intellectual capital (IC) as an academic discipline, and explore the impact of IC on the state of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The most influential articles published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital were identified. Analysis of their cited and citing works was done.

Findings

The IC discipline: first, successfully disseminates its knowledge beyond the English-language world but ignores research published in languages other than English; second, has higher self-citation rates; third, uses books for the development of its theoretical foundation; fourth, successfully converts experiential knowledge into academic knowledge; fifth, exerts a limited yet potentially increasing practical impact; and sixth, is at the theoretical consolidation stage of pre-science and is progressing toward becoming a reference discipline. No anomalies in the development of the IC discipline were observed.

Practical implications

IC researchers should pay more attention to works published in non-English journals. Given the status of IC as a professional discipline, they should continue using non-peer reviewed sources to convert experiential knowledge into academic knowledge. They also need to promote their research far beyond the traditional IC domain.

Originality/value

To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first empirical analysis of the IC discipline from the reference discipline perspective.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Alexander Serenko and Nick Bontis

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: to explore the intellectual core of the knowledge management (KM) academic discipline in order to test whether it exhibits signs of

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: to explore the intellectual core of the knowledge management (KM) academic discipline in order to test whether it exhibits signs of a reference discipline; and to analyze the theoretical and practical impact of the discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The most influential articles published in the Journal of Knowledge Management were selected and their cited and citing works were scientometrically analysed.

Findings

The KM discipline: builds its knowledge primarily upon research reports published in the English language; successfully disseminates its knowledge in both English and non‐English publications; does not exhibit a problematic self‐citation behavior; uses books and practitioner journals in the development of KM theory; converts experiential knowledge into academic knowledge; is not yet a reference discipline, but is progressing well towards becoming one; exerts a somewhat limited direct impact on practice; and is not a scientific fad.

Practical implications

KM researchers need to become aware of and use knowledge published in non‐English outlets. Given the status of KM as an applied discipline, it is critical that researchers continue utilizing non‐peer reviewed sources in their scholarly work. KM researchers should promote the dissemination of KM knowledge beyond the disciplinary boundaries. The issue whether KM should strive towards becoming a reference discipline should be debated further.

Originality/value

This study analyzes the KM field from the reference discipline perspective.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Florence Obiageli Ifeanyieze, Cosmas Ikechukwu Asogwa, Clara U. Nwankwo, Lilian Ukamaka Ekenta, Felicia Ngozi Ezebuiro, Godwin Emeka Eze, Francis Madueke Onu, Fredrick Chinedu Onah, Vincent Chidindu Asogwa, Edward Chidi Isiwu and Azunku Francis Nwangbo

Corporate organizations could enhance their economic and commercial values through knowledge acquisitions and exploitations. The purpose of this study is to analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate organizations could enhance their economic and commercial values through knowledge acquisitions and exploitations. The purpose of this study is to analyze the economic and commercial performance effect of poultry management absorptive capacity in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used in the analysis of a random sample of 300 poultry managers and owners surveyed within the South-Eastern Nigeria. The scales that quantified the latent variables of the factors were tested for reliability and consistency using confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The study found evidence that the difference between economically and commercially viable poultry businesses and failing ones depends on the level of absorptive capacity. Absorptive capacity advanced innovations that resulted in higher economic and commercial performance of poultry farm. Poultry firms' profitability, sales growth and market shares were positively increased by absorptive capacity dimensions of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out within a region in Nigeria and thus could be limited by generalization to the developed country.

Originality/value

This study is the first to link four dimensions of absorptive capacity to the economic and commercial performance of poultry businesses in Nigeria. As such, it originally breaks new frontier of poultry farming from dynamic capabilities and absorptive capacity perspectives.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Kamal Badar, Julie M. Hite and Yuosre F. Badir

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether potentially disadvantaged groups of researchers derive more research performance benefits from co-authorship network…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether potentially disadvantaged groups of researchers derive more research performance benefits from co-authorship network centrality (degree, closeness and betweenness).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on Badar et al. (2013), which found positive associations of network centrality on research performance with a moderating relationship of gender for female authors. Using data from ISI Web of Science (SCI), the authors study the same domestic co-authorship network of Chemistry researcher in Pakistan publishing from years 2002-2009 and investigate the moderating role of academic age and institutional sector on the relationship between co-authorship network centrality (degree, closeness, and betweenness) and the academic research performance (aggregate impact factor) of chemistry university/institute faculty members in Pakistan.

Findings

Ordinary least squares (OLS)-regression findings indicated a positive relationship between degree centrality and research performance with a positive moderating relationship for both academic age and institutional sector on the relationship between degree centrality and research performance for junior faculty members and faculty members employed in private sector universities/research institutes.

Practical implications

The findings can be heartening and motivating for junior faculty and private institute faculty in Pakistan in suggesting opportunities to surpass barriers of domination and poor resource access through co-authorship ties and structural social capital.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited research by strengthening the argument that potentially disadvantaged faculty with certain individual (academic age) and work-related characteristics (institutional sector) may benefit differentially from their co-authorship network centrality.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

M. Saleem Ullah Khan Sumbal, Irfan Irfan, Susanne Durst, Umar Farooq Sahibzada, Muhammad Adnan Waseem and Eric Tsui

The purpose of this article is to investigate how organization retain the knowledge of Contract Workforce (CWF) and to understand the associated challenges in this regard.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate how organization retain the knowledge of Contract Workforce (CWF) and to understand the associated challenges in this regard.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting an inductive approach, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior managers, project heads and consultants working in leading oil and gas companies across eight countries (USA, Australia, UAE, KSA, Pakistan, UK, Thailand and Russia). Thematic analysis was carried out to analyze the data collected.

Findings

CWF appears to be a significant source of knowledge attrition and even knowledge loss in the oil and gas sector. There are various risks associated with hiring of CWF, such as hallowing of organizational memory, repeated training of contractors, no knowledge base, workforce shortage among others which can impede the knowledge retention capability of O&G companies in the context of contract workforce. Various knowledge retention strategies for CWF have been revealed, however, there is interplay of various factors such as proportion of CWF deployed, proper resource utilization, cross-functional multi-level teams' involvement and strength of transactional ties. Maintaining strong relationships (Transactional ties) is crucial to maintain a virtual organizational memory (partial knowledge retention) and to follow a adopting a rehired when required policy.

Originality/value

The knowledge retention issue in the context of CWF has not be addressed in past researches. This article attempts to fill this gap.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Sascha Fuerst and Peter Zettinig

This paper aims to examine the dynamic process of knowledge creation of the international new venture (INV) through the interaction with network partners. The process of…

4830

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the dynamic process of knowledge creation of the international new venture (INV) through the interaction with network partners. The process of how INVs make use of external sources for the acquisition of international market knowledge is not well-understood.

Design/methodology/approach

To uncover the dynamics of the knowledge creation process, the authors applied event-driven process research by following the internationalization process of four INVs in real time. More specifically, they adopted qualitative diary research combined with periodic follow-up interviews as the main data collection method. A visual mapping strategy was used for the analysis of the process data.

Findings

The analysis shows that different pathways of knowledge acquisition through congenital learning, searching, vicarious learning and grafting interact with each other. Grafting and experiential learning alongside the partner lead to the acquisition of internationalization knowledge in particular. Knowledge sources for international market knowledge are proactively created by the entrepreneurs. The wider effectual stakeholder network constitutes an important source for international market knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The authors followed the early internationalization process of the case firm in real time over a 10-month period. This provides a limited window of observation. Future research might extend the observation period to examine further the evolutionary nature of the different learning types throughout the growth of the INV. The case firms operate in Internet-enabled businesses and are all located in the same country and city (i.e. Colombia and the city of Medellin). Future studies might focus on firms operating in different industries and geographical areas.

Practical implications

Congenital technological knowledge is a prerequisite for internationalization. The entrepreneur, however, does not need to rely on congenital international market knowledge. Such knowledge can be developed through network partners. Foreign business and institutional knowledge can be obtained vicariously, also from professional advisors. Internationalization knowledge, however, needs to be developed in close interaction with an international cooperation partner, where a strong relationship commitment prevails.

Originality/value

The authors use effectuation theory combined with process research methods to gain insights into the dynamics of knowledge creation within the INV. Thereby, they are able to shed light on the dynamics of the process that is difficult to capture through cross-sectional research designs. Research on the internationalization process of young ventures in the context of Latin America is scarce. Therefore, the paper contributes new knowledge about the development of these firms in that particular region.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Jay Liebowitz

Knowledge management is one of the hottest topics in organizations today. Much of what is being proposed and accomplished is not novel by any means. Techniques, tools…

2064

Abstract

Knowledge management is one of the hottest topics in organizations today. Much of what is being proposed and accomplished is not novel by any means. Techniques, tools, concepts, and methodologies can easily be borrowed from the expert systems and artificial intelligence disciplines. This paper emphasizes that expert systems need to be an integral part of knowledge management if knowledge management is to succeed, and not simply be a fad!

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Izhak Berkovich

The practice of theory borrowing from other research fields is common in interdisciplinary and applied research. Nevertheless, educational administration researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

The practice of theory borrowing from other research fields is common in interdisciplinary and applied research. Nevertheless, educational administration researchers seldom discuss this phenomenon and its complexities in depth.

Design/methodology/approach

This essay provides an overview of what has been written about the practice of theory borrowing.

Findings

After presenting the criticism on misusing theory borrowing, it outlines several recommendations to improve theory borrowing in education administration research by domesticating it through conceptual blending.

Originality/value

The purpose of this essay is to motivate educational administration scholars to reflect on the practice of theory borrowing. The guidelines offered here for promoting conceptual blending serve as a middle ground for mitigating a key problem of theory borrowing.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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