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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Kirstin Mitchell, Monica Nyakake and Juliet Oling

This paper explores “lessons learned” resulting from a process evaluation of a peer‐led HIV/AIDS prevention programme targeting street children and youth in urban Uganda…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores “lessons learned” resulting from a process evaluation of a peer‐led HIV/AIDS prevention programme targeting street children and youth in urban Uganda. The purpose was to explore aspects of implementation that either enhanced or hindered the effectiveness of the peer educator (PE) role.

Design/methodology/approach

The process data derive from three reviews conducted throughout the project lifespan. The reviews engaged participatory evaluation methods such as focus groups (four) and workshops (three), as well as drawing on monitoring data such as activity evaluations.

Findings

The street youth in this project made effective peer educators. We suggest that letting the target group choose their peers and focusing on street youth undergoing rehabilitation engendered ownership of PEs by the target group and accountability among PEs themselves. The role was highly coveted and the PEs became powerful role models. The most useful work of the PEs lay in helping their peers to leave the risky environment of the streets, hence reducing their vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. By defining the role broadly and situating peer education activities within a broader strategy of capacity building and advocacy, we were able to remain sensitive to the context in which street youth make “choices” about their sexual behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper contributes significantly to our understanding of the effective implementation of the PE method in this setting. It will be particularly helpful to practitioners in the design stage of similar peer‐led programmes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Annik Sorhaindo, Kirstin Mitchell, Adam Fletcher, Patricia Jessiman, Peter Keogh and Chris Bonell

Evaluation of the Teens & Toddlers (T & T) positive youth development (PYD) and teenage pregnancy prevention programme suggested that the intervention had…

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluation of the Teens & Toddlers (T & T) positive youth development (PYD) and teenage pregnancy prevention programme suggested that the intervention had minimal effectiveness partly due to its unclear theory of change. The purpose of this paper is to examine the lived experiences of young women participating in the programme to contribute to a clearer understanding of intervention process and potential mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted four focus groups (n=20), eight paired or triad interviews (n=12) and 15 interviews with young women participating in an randomized controlled trial of the T & T programme in England, analysing these data using a phenomenological approach.

Findings

T & T provided some opportunities to experience the “five Cs” that underpin PYD programme theory: competence, confidence, connection, character and caring. However, the young women did not experience the programme in a way that would consistently develop these characteristics. The lack of opportunities for skill-building and challenge in the activities constrained their ability to build competence and confidence. Some programme facilitators and counsellors were able to achieve connections and caring relationships with the young women, though other adults involved in the programme were sometimes perceived by the participants as overly critical. The character development activities undertaken in the programme addressed attitudes towards sexual risk-taking.

Originality/value

Few studies of the PYD approach examine young people’s perspectives. This research suggests that the young women were not consistently provided with opportunities to achieve youth development within the T & T programmes. In refining the programme, more thought is needed regarding how delivery of particular components may facilitate or impede a PYD experience.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Wan Zuriea Wan Ismail, Mat Naim Abdullah and Adi Irfan Che-Ani

This paper aims to assess factors that affect carbon sequestration on green roofs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess factors that affect carbon sequestration on green roofs.

Design/methodology/approach

The most current academic literature related to carbon sequestration and green roofs carbon sequestration performance was reviewed.

Findings

Factors affecting carbon sequestration were discussed and classified into the following factors: plants, physical and maintenance factors. The authors’ findings are significant because they can be used to optimize green roofs performance for carbon sequestration.

Originality/value

Factors affecting carbon sequestration will optimize intensive green roofs performance.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Steven Tam and David E. Gray

This study examines employees' learning preferences in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at different life-cycle stages.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines employees' learning preferences in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at different life-cycle stages.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has two phases. Phase I classified a sample of 30 Hong Kong SMEs into three different life-cycle stages (inception, high growth or maturity). Phase II then explored/compared their employees' learning practices in terms of importance using a mixed-method design through an online learning questionnaire followed by face-to-face semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Based on a list of 32 learning practices common to SME workplaces, the study identified how SME employees perceive the importance of a learning practice. The top 5 and the bottom 5 learning practices in SMEs across life-cycle stages are presented to promote best interests for SME executives.

Research limitations/implications

While SME learning is highly varied, this study sheds light on some traceable context about it as an SME grows. Similar studies with additional SMEs, including SMEs in other locations, are encouraged to strengthen the findings.

Practical implications

The findings help SME executives understand what learning practices are most important (or least important) for their employees, given the life-cycle stage of the firm. Aligning a business with employees' learning preferences in a timely fashion is a managerial decision to be made for driving organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

It is among the first studies connecting employee learning in SMEs and organizational life cycle to address a critical but missing inquiry.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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