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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Kirsten M. Rosacker and Robert E. Rosacker

This study aims to revisit and extends the work of Rosacker and Rosacker (2012) that called for increased interdisciplinary efforts to address and solve the critical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to revisit and extends the work of Rosacker and Rosacker (2012) that called for increased interdisciplinary efforts to address and solve the critical issues (critical success factors) facing technologically-enabled remote-access voting platforms. It builds upon the background platform presented there, which included an historical timeline of information and communication technologies and an e-voting literature review, and extends that work by providing a state-of-the-art update and review of the rapidly changing voter environment from societal, technological and experiential studies over the past decade. Specific focus is directed at technology-enabled, remote-access voting, while also considering the important role technological advances can play in improving voter registration/confirmation procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a brief review of significant societal and technological changes, including the rapid evolution of the internet of things, is undertaken to frame the discussion. Second, a sample of several technology-enabled, remote-access voting experiments are reviewed and critiqued. Third, currently available technical solutions targeting technology-enabled voter registration and vote casting are offered as the next step in the process that will ultimately lead to remote-access voting becoming widely deployed across smart devices. Finally, some contemporaneous conclusions are tendered.

Findings

Society and technology-enabled devices have each witnessed myriad changes and advancements in the second decade of the 21st century. These have led to numerous remote-access voting experiments across the globe that have overwhelmingly proven the concept of technology-enabled, remote-access voting to be viable while also identifying/reasserting issues (critical success factors) that continue to restrain its full implementation. Importantly, none of the problems identified is fatal to the concept.

Originality/value

This study considers the issue of technologically-enabled, remote-access voting focussing on the impacts associated with the portfolio of recent societal and technological advancements including the many vexing concerns and issues presented by the coronavirus pandemic. Social distancing is limiting access to the traditional methods of in-person voting for both election officials and voters bringing into question the November 2020 US national election. Calls for expanded mail voting options and the requisite federal funding required to support these efforts are increasing, widespread and broadly persuasive. Wholly missing in this debate is an exhaustive consideration and discussion of technologically enhanced, remote-access voting systems and their role in filling the void.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Kathryn M. Zuckweiler, Kirsten M. Rosacker and Suzanne K. Hayes

This paper aims to develop a better understanding of business students' perceptions of the relative importance of corporate governance best practices within the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a better understanding of business students' perceptions of the relative importance of corporate governance best practices within the context of major area of study and compare student rankings of corporate governance best practices to those of working professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a previously published survey, data were collected from business students at two Midwestern US universities and analyzed using factor analysis.

Findings

This research demonstrated that students rank strategic human resource management as the most important corporate governance practice, matching the perceptions of professionals. Accounting majors report significantly greater understanding of corporate governance, the importance of corporate governance to business and the role of understanding corporate governance in their careers as compared to management majors.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the inclusion of business students at only two US universities. Further studies should be conducted to better understand the similarities and differences between students and professionals and accounting and management majors in their perceptions of corporate governance best practices.

Practical implications

Managers can use these findings to enhance the training recent college graduates receive on corporate governance topics. Business schools can use these findings to evaluate ways to embed corporate governance throughout the curriculum.

Originality/Value

This research highlights gaps in current business school curriculum coverage of corporate governance best practices. It compares and contrasts students' and professionals' perceptions of best practices and offers suggestions for managers and educators.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Kirsten M. Rosacker and Robert E. Rosacker

The project management literature contains a growing body of research addressing information technology (IT). Currently, the majority of these studies direct attention…

Abstract

Purpose

The project management literature contains a growing body of research addressing information technology (IT). Currently, the majority of these studies direct attention towards projects completed within private sector organizations. Given the unique characteristics surrounding public sector organizations, this paper aims to argue that it is inappropriate to apply the lessons learned from private sector organizations in the public arena without investigating their applicability empirically.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the historical evolution of IT usage within public sector organizations is offered. The broad body of project management knowledge is discussed, and the unique characteristics of public sector organizations are detailed. These three concepts combine to provide a conceptual framework for reviewing empirical research published in Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy.

Findings

It is concluded that the additional empirical research is needed to further our understanding of the applicability of project management principles, developed and applied in private sector organizations, to the unique organizational format presented by public sector operations.

Originality/value

As the use of, and dependence on, IT within all organizations continues to expand throughout the world, it becomes critically important for managers to understand “best business practices” so that these successful managerial techniques can be applied appropriately to enhance and refine operational practices. Importantly, problems associated with the successful management of information technology projects have been and continue to be significant concerns, thus highlighting the need for better knowledge development and transfer that can be provided by well designed and completed research.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Kirsten M. Rosacker and David L. Olson

Project management literature contains an evolving body of research addressing critical success factors. The majority of these studies have focused on projects completed…

Abstract

Purpose

Project management literature contains an evolving body of research addressing critical success factors. The majority of these studies have focused on projects completed within private sector organizations or, in a few cases, a mix of public and private sector organizations. Given the distinct qualitative differences that exist between private and public sector entities, it would be naive to blindly apply the lessons learned from prior studies to public sector information technology (IT) project management. This paper seeks to investigate public sector information system critical success factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey research methodology and the project implementation profile, this study empirically tests the critical success factors proposed and confirmed in the existing management literature as important to information system project implementation success within the context of public sector IT projects.

Findings

This research effort strongly suggests that significant differences exist between private and public sector IT projects with respect to critical success factors. Specifically, the application of critical success factors to project management within the unique public sector environment appears to be a reasonable course of action; however, the order of importance or dominance of each factor differs from that reported in prior research focusing on private sector efforts.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will serve as a useful and practical guide for both experienced and new state government information project managers as they seek to understand the key steps and processes that must be addressed throughout the life cycle of an IT implementation project.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Robert E. Rosacker and Kirsten Rosacker

The purpose of this paper is to provide a timely discussion of the important topic of remote‐access voting technology.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a timely discussion of the important topic of remote‐access voting technology.

Design/methodology/approach

First, an introduction to the topic is offered; second the existing state of the art is considered; third, a brief history of electronic and internet voting methods is presented; and fourth, a short list of critical success factors for remote‐access voting is presented. Finally, a conclusion is offered surrounding how academics and practitioners can collaboratively proceed to address the salient issues and barriers that currently prohibit the advancement of remote‐access voting.

Findings

There is a brief and largely successful history involving applications of information communication technologies (ICTs) and computer technology to assist in data capture and tabulation of democratic elections. While several critical issues have been identified, none has been so significant that an end‐game strategy should be invoked rather than continued innovation. Concurrently, the business world has witnessed an expanding use of computer‐based infrastructures and enhanced ICTs to facilitate the processing of remote‐access commercial transactions. These advancements have provided a rich opportunity to seek out, identify, and address the substantive operational issues permitting the successful expansion of a variety of business methods, models, and processes. While these successes have provided a solid foundation upon which e‐government voting systems can be attempted, such a process improvement has been elusive to this date with many of the real issues and concerns seeming to be too large to resolve.

Originality/value

The paper considers the important issue of remote‐access voting as a means for supporting the expansion and refinement of democratic processes across the world through increased citizen participation.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Zahir Irani

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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