Search results

1 – 4 of 4
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Kirsten Jane Robertson, Robert Aitken, Maree Thyne and Leah Watkins

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 486 parents of pre-schoolers. A cross-sectional design involving a quantitative online survey measured the number and age of children in the home, parents’ mediation styles and advertising attitudes, parents’ levels of education and pre-schoolers’ television exposure.

Findings

Co-viewing was the most frequent viewing experience followed by instructive and restrictive mediation. A univariate analysis revealed that parental education and negative attitudes towards advertising were associated with less viewing time for pre-schoolers, although the presence of other siblings mediated this relationship. Logistic regression revealed mediation styles were associated with parental education, attitudes towards advertising, viewing time and the presence of other siblings. Pre-schoolers with an older sibling were less likely to experience co-viewing and more likely to experience instructive mediation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings revealed that parents of pre-schoolers are concerned about advertising to children and actively mediate their child’s exposure. Parental attitudes and education, and sibling composition influence pre-schoolers’ television consumption, and pre-schoolers with an older sibling might be most vulnerable to negative media effects. The sample was limited to primarily higher educated parents and might not generalize.

Originality/value

The study extends the field by focusing on pre-schoolers and provides novel insights into the influence of sibling composition on television consumption.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Kirsten Holmes and Jane Ali-Knight

The events and festivals literature relies on theories and models borrowed from tourism studies which may insufficiently account for the unique characteristics of events…

Abstract

Purpose

The events and festivals literature relies on theories and models borrowed from tourism studies which may insufficiently account for the unique characteristics of events and festivals. Using four case studies from Australia, United Arab Emirates and the UK, this paper aims to analyse events and festival life cycles using the Tourism Area Life Cycle (TALC) framework (Butler, 1980).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual in that it theorises the range of event and festival life cycle trajectories; however, four event case studies are also used to illustrate this approach.

Findings

Findings facilitate an extension of Butler’s model to include additional trajectories and accompanying underpinning critical factors that better explain and predict the nature of events and festivals.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on four case studies from the cultural sector which is ideal for developing theory but limits the contexts examined in this paper. The findings are only applicable to recurring events and festivals.

Practical implications

In the new model, seven different pathways, ranging from continued growth to cancellation, suggest potential opportunities and risks for events and festivals. The results are of particular relevance for event managers, who can use the case studies and trajectories as reference points for event growth and consolidation.

Social implications

The case studies reveal that successful events are seen to have strong ties to their local communities and are rooted in the destination.

Originality/value

The paper’s originality is in both the context of utilising diverse international cultural festival and events as case studies and the proposal of seven alternative pathways for events and festivals, which extend Butler’s TALC to the unique context of these temporal phenomena.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sarah Talari, Kanmani Balaji and Alison Jane Stansfield

The diagnosis of autism in adults often involves the use of tools recommended by NICE guidance but which are validated in children. The purpose of the paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The diagnosis of autism in adults often involves the use of tools recommended by NICE guidance but which are validated in children. The purpose of the paper is to establish the strength of the association between the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) scores and the final clinical outcome in an all intellectual quotients adult autism diagnostic service and to establish if this in any way relates with gender and intellectual ability.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes referrals to Leeds Autism Diagnostic Service in 2015 that received a clinical outcome. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were calculated to evaluate ADI-R and final clinical outcomes. Logistic regression model was used to predict the effect of the scores in all the domains of ADI-R and the two-way interactions with gender and intellectual ability.

Findings

ADI-R has a high sensitivity and low specificity and is useful to rule out the presence of autism, but if used alone, it can over diagnose. Restricted stereotyped behaviours are the strongest predictor for autism and suggests that the threshold should be increased to enhance its specificity.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single site study with small effect size, so results may not be replicable. It supports the combined use of ADI-R and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and suggests increasing ADI-R cut-offs to increase the specificity.

Practical implications

The clinical team may consider piloting a modified ADI-R as suggested by the results.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this is the only study of ADI-R in an adult population of all intellectual abilities.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4