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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Ilona Toth, Sanna Heinänen and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of virtual community trust on work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of virtual community trust on work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms. The emergence of the platform economy is changing the work environment fundamentally. It has enabled the appearance of alternative work arrangements, such as temporary organizing and the increase of independent contracting, also among highly specialized knowledge workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with an online survey and used to test the relationships between virtual community trust, work engagement and person–job fit. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test the goodness of a theoretical model.

Findings

Based on the data of 127 experts contracting on digital work platforms, virtual community trust positively affects both work engagement and person–job fit. In addition, the relationship between work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms is significant and positive.

Practical implications

This study shows that trust among independent contractors working on digital platforms is important for work engagement and that platform providers can improve work performance through person–job fit by assisting in the creation of trust among members of their platforms.

Originality/value

The research literature on knowledge work in the changing context of work is scarce, and the role of trust in the context of digital work platforms needs clarification. This paper tests a theoretical model on the effects of trust among highly skilled experts working in the digital platform context as independent contractors and provides evidence for the importance of building trust among members of a virtual work community.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Kaisa Henttonen, Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

Trust and control through contracting have been juxtaposed in many studies addressing interorganizational collaboration and knowledge exchange. In this study, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

Trust and control through contracting have been juxtaposed in many studies addressing interorganizational collaboration and knowledge exchange. In this study, the authors move from the opposite ends of a continuum between trust as an attitude and control exercised through formal contracts toward the center of the continuum where trust and contracting start to show similar features. The authors ask how trust in its analytical form and control gained through establishing informal protection for knowledge assets affect the innovation and market performance of firms engaged in research and development (R&D) alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine the existing literature and conduct a quantitative empirical study to answer the research question.

Findings

The authors find, first, that controlling an organization’s own knowledge assets in R&D alliances with informal means of protection can be more effective than a strategy of controlling the alliance through formal contracts. Second, the authors find that an analytical audit of partner trustworthiness, and especially partner capabilities and goodwill can be more effective than trust as an attitude.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support softening the sharp distinction between trust and control and provide evidence on the relevance of highlighting the firm point of view in knowledge management in R&D alliance governance.

Originality/value

The study adds to the existing understanding of trust and control in R&D alliance governance. Specifically, the authors turn the focus from interorganizational governance to intra-organizational knowledge management measures, and particularly toward how a focal actor can take an analytical approach to evaluate partner trustworthiness and use informal control in protecting its own knowledge assets. Consequently, this study also provides a plausible explanation for the contradictory findings in studies that examine the relationship between trust and control. The study indicates that depending on the specific nature of trust and control, they can be either a complement or a supplement factors: the extreme forms of trust and control are notably different from those forms that share similar features.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Heidi Olander, Mika Vanhala, Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

The purpose of this paper is to study how the motivation in firms to safeguard the prerequisites of innovation relates to the strength of the employee-related protection…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how the motivation in firms to safeguard the prerequisites of innovation relates to the strength of the employee-related protection mechanisms that deal with knowledge leaking and knowledge leaving, and the moderating effect of organizational trust in the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested on a sample collected in Finland from 80 companies engaged in R&D. A partial least squares was used for the analyses.

Findings

Knowledge leaking and leaving from a firm can be approached with both formalized and soft types of employee-related mechanisms; that the motivation to secure innovativeness positively relates to both forms; and that the presence of organizational trust is especially effective in reinforcing employee-related practices that can prevent knowledge leaving.

Research limitations/implications

The data were gathered in a single western European country and that may have affected the results.

Practical implications

The managers would do well to introduce both formalized and soft forms of protection so as to mitigate the effects of knowledge both leaving and leaking. Building on the findings of this study, managers could prioritize between the different categories and mechanisms depending on the market and industry they operate in.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature by studying quantitatively the employee-related protection mechanisms and the effect of organizational trust in the usage of those mechanisms.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Minna Jukka, Kirsimarja Blomqvist, Peter Ping Li and Chunmei Gan

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Chinese and Finnish managers in cross-cultural supply-chain relationships evaluate their business partners’ trustworthiness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Chinese and Finnish managers in cross-cultural supply-chain relationships evaluate their business partners’ trustworthiness and distrustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Representatives of two Finnish companies and their Chinese and Finnish suppliers were interviewed to collect qualitative data from 23 managers.

Findings

The Chinese managers emphasized relationship-specific, personalized trustworthiness. They highlighted personalized communication and benevolence, which manifested in respect and reciprocity, rooted in the Chinese notion of “guanxi” as personal ties. In contrast, the Finnish managers’ view of trustworthiness was more associated with depersonalized organizational attributes. They emphasized the dimension of integrity, especially promise-keeping. In addition, tentative signs of trust ambivalence, as a balance between trust- and distrust-related factors, were identified for both the Chinese and the Finns.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the exploratory nature of this study the validity of the findings is limited to these data and context. Future studies could explore other national contexts as well as the effects of industry, market position, and position in the supply chain.

Practical implications

The findings of this study bring a valuable understanding of the potential pitfalls and unique challenges in cross-border inter-firm transactions. These can enhance inter-firm trust building in a cross-cultural context.

Originality/value

This study enriches the view of trust as a holistic process of simultaneous evaluation of both trustworthiness and distrustworthiness. In this process, trust ambivalence could serve as the intermediate construct between trust and distrust. These two contrary yet complementary opposites constitute a duality to be managed from the perspective of yin-yang balancing.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Minna Jukka, Tatiana Andreeva, Kirsimarja Blomqvist and Kaisu Puumalainen

This study aims to examine relational norms in cross-cultural business settings. Cross-cultural business partners may differ in their normative orientations toward…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine relational norms in cross-cultural business settings. Cross-cultural business partners may differ in their normative orientations toward relational exchange. Owing to the high extent of international trade, there is a need for developing a more nuanced understanding of cross-cultural relational exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

The repertory grid method was used to elicit the personal constructs characterizing the perceptions of business-to-business (B2B) relational exchange for 22 Russian and Finnish managers. These items were further categorized into categories of relational elements drawn from relational exchange literature using a content analysis. Then, the category means of scored importance and scored evaluations of domestic and foreign business partners were tested statistically.

Findings

Relational norms of flexibility, information exchange, long-term orientation, mutuality and solidarity were equally important to both Russian and Finnish managers. The importance of a business partner’s ability seems to be culturally dependent. Sharing the same cultural background might have an adverse effect when evaluating poorly functioning business relations.

Research limitations/implications

The validity of these findings is limited to this context and material. Future research should repeat cross-cultural comparisons of the relational norms with more data and other nationalities.

Practical implications

Firms should focus on long-term orientation and mutual targets to form well-functioning cross-cultural business relationships.

Originality/value

This study provides new knowledge into B2B marketing literature by revealing the role of relational norms, business partner’s ability and shared cultural background on functionality of cross-cultural business relations. It also demonstrates the use of the repertory grid method in studying perceptions of relational norms.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jorge F.S. Gomes, Pia Hurmelinna, Virgílio Amaral and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

This article investigates the reasons for collaboration and the barriers to cooperation between universities and industry organizations. In an increasingly integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates the reasons for collaboration and the barriers to cooperation between universities and industry organizations. In an increasingly integrated world, cooperation between universities and companies is likely to grow in forthcoming years.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken in this article differs from previous works in the sense that it reveals the psychological frameworks that academics and managers hold about collaborating with each other. Data come from a survey of academic and managerial staff working in several universities and companies in Portugal and Finland.

Findings

Overall results show that academics still see companies as information sources for their researches, but they are also willing to participate in joint projects in which academic knowledge is not the sole output.

Originality/value

Provides information for companies and universities with regard to how to embark on such cooperative endeavors.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Mika Vanhala, Kaisu Puumalainen and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

Modern organizations face an increasing need for trust, yet there are fewer opportunities for the development and maintenance of interpersonal trust, so they cannot rely…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern organizations face an increasing need for trust, yet there are fewer opportunities for the development and maintenance of interpersonal trust, so they cannot rely only on that. There is therefore a need for complementary forms of organizational trust. It is believed that the impersonal element of organizational trust is a useful concept and should be incorporated into the measures. This paper seeks to conceptualize and clarify the impersonal element of organizational trust and develop scales on which to measure it.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized model is tested on a sample of 166 respondents with different organizational backgrounds. Confirmatory factor analysis is used.

Findings

It was found that impersonal trust in the organizational context consists of two dimensions: capability and fairness, the final scales containing 18 and 13 items, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

A more holistic approach to organizational trust is proposed and a measuring instrument for the impersonal element is provided.

Practical implications

It is suggested that organizational trust is critical for contemporary organizations. Further evaluation and development of the concept require a comprehensive measurement instrument incorporating both interpersonal and impersonal elements. This paper identifies the conceptual domain for the less studied impersonal element of organizational trust, and provides a measurement scale.

Originality/value

The construct of impersonal trust and the measurement scale developed and validated in this study represent a step forward towards the effective and reliable measurement of organizational trust. To the best of the researchers' knowledge, this is the first study to provide a comprehensive, psychometrically sound, operationally valid measure of impersonal trust.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Riikka Ellonen, Kirsimarja Blomqvist and Kaisu Puumalainen

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effects of the dimensions of organisational trust on organisational innovativeness in a relatively large survey sample of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effects of the dimensions of organisational trust on organisational innovativeness in a relatively large survey sample of the information and communication technology (ICT) and paper and pulp industries in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

Organisational trust is deemed to consist of both interpersonal and impersonal types of trust. The empirical part of the study shows the relationship between various types of trust and dimensions of organisational innovativeness. Quantitative empirical analysis is based on a survey of 40 organisational units and 214 respondents within the ICT and paper and pulp industries.

Findings

The impact of different types of organisational trust on dimensions of organisational innovativeness was analyzed. The results imply that the impersonal form in particular, namely institutional trust, has an important role in determining organisational innovativeness.

Research implications

This study contributes both to the literature on organisational innovativeness, as well as to the emerging theory on trust, in its approach to trust as not only an interpersonal issue, but also as something with impersonal aspects.

Practical implications

It is suggested that managers should pay special attention to impersonal forms of trust, i.e. to the institutional dimension of organisational trust. Above all, institutional trust and its development could be seen as a strategic question for companies.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant theoretical contribution by examining the linkages between various dimensions of organisational trust and organisational innovativeness, which have previously been studied only to a very minor extent. It thus provides a richer understanding of the relationship between organisational trust and innovativeness.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Tommi Auvinen, Iiris Aaltio and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

This paper approaches manager's storytelling as a means for promoting organizational aims and for constructing leadership, and examines the intentions of managers in this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper approaches manager's storytelling as a means for promoting organizational aims and for constructing leadership, and examines the intentions of managers in this process. We focus on the context of storytelling and the content of the stories told by managers in order to identify areas of influence on subordinates. Storytelling in relation to building a narrative identity for the manager is also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory empirical study that draws on 13 thematic interviews with Finnish managers working in different fields. A qualitative thematic analysis is used in order to analyze the data.

Findings

As a result of the study we found that managers tell stories in order to evoke leadership characterized by six areas of influence: motivation, inspiration, defusing conflict, influencing superiors, discovering a focus and constructing trust. According to the findings, the managers see stories as an effective means of building trust between leaders and their subordinates. It was also found that managers can use stories self‐reflectively and as a means of self‐development.

Practical implications

Storytelling can empower leadership and support interaction with subordinates. One application of this study is informing elements of leadership development such as business education programmes for managers and future managers.

Originality/value

Narrative leadership is a highly valued but still under‐researched approach to leadership. This study seeks to fill this gap in the research by providing an empirically based contribution to the field, emphasizing the intentional nature of storytelling.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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