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1 – 10 of 110
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Kimberly W. O'Connor, Kimberly S. McDonald, Brandon T. McDaniel and Gordon B. Schmidt

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits. We…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits. We examined whether informal online learning through “typical” types of social media behaviors (e.g. liking a post or messaging another user) and “networking” types of social media behaviors (e.g. endorsing another user, writing recommendations, going “live,” or looking for a job) impacted career-related perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we analyzed Amazon Mechanical Turk survey data gathered from adult participants (n = 475). We focused our inquiry specifically on two social media sites, Facebook and LinkedIn. We asked participants about their social media use and behaviors, as well as their perceptions of career satisfaction and career benefits related to social media.

Findings

We found that both typical and networking types of social media behaviors positively predicted the “knowing whom” career competency (defined as career relevant networks and contacts that individuals use to develop their careers) and career satisfaction. Only networking behaviors were positively associated with perceived career benefits of social media use. We further found that LinkedIn users’ career satisfaction was lower compared to non-LinkedIn users.

Originality/value

This study adds to the small, but growing body of career research focusing on social capital and social media. Our results suggest that informal online learning via social media may have a positive impact on employees’ career-related perceptions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Kimberly S. McDonald, Linda M. Hite and Brad Gilbreath

This qualitative exploratory study investigated the career development experiences, concerns, and interests of hourly employees. The study, conducted in the USA, focused on…

611

Abstract

This qualitative exploratory study investigated the career development experiences, concerns, and interests of hourly employees. The study, conducted in the USA, focused on satisfaction with work and careers and the potential role of career development activities in enhancing work life. Results revealed a range of needs and perspectives regarding career development and reinforced the importance of conducting further studies with this key population. While workplace research typically has highlighted managers and executives, hourly employees are essential to organizational output. Therefore organizations are urged to devote more attention to the career development of these often‐overlooked employees.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Linda M. Hite and Kimberly S. McDonald

Although the proportion of women entering management has increasedgreatly in the last two decades, their subsequent promotion intoexecutive positions has not materialized…

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Abstract

Although the proportion of women entering management has increased greatly in the last two decades, their subsequent promotion into executive positions has not materialized. Explores how management development training may impede women′s progress. Examines factors that may hinder women′s opportunities to advance into upper management (and, consequently, to contribute to the success of their organizations). Also looks at research on gender issues in the academic classroom and how this literature relates to management development training. Discusses implications and recommendations to consider when training and developing women managers and provides an agenda for further research on potential gender bias in managerial training and development opportunities.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Melissa Mosley Wetzel, James V. Hoffman and Beth Maloch

Our purpose in this chapter is to present a model of coaching used in a preservice elementary teacher preparation program that relies on video as a mentoring tool. We call this…

Abstract

Purpose

Our purpose in this chapter is to present a model of coaching used in a preservice elementary teacher preparation program that relies on video as a mentoring tool. We call this tool RCA, or Retrospective Coaching Analysis, and it is based on Goodman’s (1996) work on Retrospective Miscue Analysis. We also provide examples of how cooperating teachers used videos to identify important moments of practice to elicit reflection with their preservice teachers.

Methodology/approach

We collected video recordings of cooperating teacher/preservice teacher pairs engaging in mentoring conversations using videos of preservice teachers’ practice.

Findings

In this chapter, we focus on the cooperating teachers’ choices about when to stop the video to engage in reflection with their preservice teachers. In selecting a focus point for the RCA Event, the CTs chose moments that met some of these four criteria: appreciative, learner-focused, disruptive, and/or generative. We also found the challenges in selecting focus points and in staying with moments of video long enough to generate reflection, which made the model of mentoring challenging to implement.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of this reflective mentoring tool has led to revisions in our theoretical model of coaching, as described in this chapter. The research suggests the importance of closely examining reflective talk between cooperating teachers and preservice teachers. Our work also illustrates a shift in the use of video in preservice teaching from a video-case based perspectives to reflection embedded in practice.

Practical implications

Our study suggests the importance of selecting moments of practice as the basis for mentoring and coaching, but the research helped us to understand that RCA has affordances and constraints, and therefore, should be a tool for teachers to use flexibly within our theoretical model of Coaching with CARE.

Originality/value

Teacher educators will find the RCA model to be a new way of approaching collaborative work with teachers in the field within a practice-based teacher education program.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2022

Kimberly V. Legocki, Kristen L. Walker and Meike Eilert

This paper aims to contribute to the emerging body of research on firestorms, specifically on the inflammatory user-generated content (UGC) created in response to brand…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the emerging body of research on firestorms, specifically on the inflammatory user-generated content (UGC) created in response to brand transgressions. By analyzing and segmenting UGC created and shared in the wake of three different events, the authors identify which type of inflammatory message is most likely to be widely shared; thus, contributing to a possible online firestorm.

Design/methodology/approach

Tweets were collected involving brand transgressions in the retail, fast food and technology space from varying timeframe and diverse media coverage. Then, the tweets were coded for message intention and analyzed with linguistics software to determine the message characteristics and framing. A two-step cluster analysis identified three types of UGC.

Findings

The authors found that message dimensions and the framing of tweets in the context of brand transgressions differed in characteristics, sentiment, call to action and the extent to which the messages were shared. The findings contradict traditional negative word-of-mouth studies involving idiosyncratic service and product failure. During online brand firestorms, rational activism messages with a call to action, generated in response to a firm’s transgression or “sparks,” have a higher likelihood of being shared (virality).

Originality/value

This research provides novel insights into UGC created after brand transgressions. Different types of messages created after these events vary in the extent that they “fan the flames” of the transgression. A message typology and flowchart are provided to assist managers in identifying and responding to three message types: ash, sparks and embers.

Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Steve McDonald, Amanda K. Damarin, Jenelle Lawhorne and Annika Wilcox

The Internet and social media have fundamentally transformed the ways in which individuals find jobs. Relatively little is known about how demand-side market actors use online…

Abstract

The Internet and social media have fundamentally transformed the ways in which individuals find jobs. Relatively little is known about how demand-side market actors use online information and the implications for social stratification and mobility. This study provides an in-depth exploration of the online recruitment strategies pursued by human resource (HR) professionals. Qualitative interviews with 61 HR recruiters in two southern US metro areas reveal two distinct patterns in how they use Internet resources to fill jobs. For low and general skill work, they post advertisements to online job boards (e.g., Monster and CareerBuilder) with massive audiences of job seekers. By contrast, for high-skill or supervisory positions, they use LinkedIn to target passive candidates – employed individuals who are not looking for work but might be willing to change jobs. Although there are some intermediate practices, the overall picture is one of an increasingly bifurcated “winner-take-all” labor market in which recruiters focus their efforts on poaching specialized superstar talent (“purple squirrels”) from the ranks of the currently employed, while active job seekers are relegated to the hyper-competitive and impersonal “black hole” of the online job boards.

Details

Work and Labor in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-585-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Kimberly Thomas-Francois and Simon Somogyi

It has generally been anticipated that the growth of Internet technology and e-commerce would result in virtual grocery shopping (VGS) becoming a normal way of life for consumers…

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Abstract

Purpose

It has generally been anticipated that the growth of Internet technology and e-commerce would result in virtual grocery shopping (VGS) becoming a normal way of life for consumers worldwide. However, the adoption of VGS, except in China and other Asian countries, has been quite slow and there is little understanding for this reason. Using Canada as a research context, the purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of consumers towards VGS with a focus on their technological readiness and the impact of the optimisation of consumer learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology was undertaken using cluster analysis with descriptive statistics to segment the different groups of consumers from a sample of 1,034 adult respondents. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was then used to test a theoretical model for consumers’ intention to adopt VGS.

Findings

The study found that the attitudes of consumers towards virtual shopping, convenience motivation, perceived ease of use (PEOU), perceived risk and consumer learning are all factors that impact consumers' intention to adopt virtual food shopping. The research also identified four segments of consumers in the Canadian market based on their attitudes and intention to adopt VGS. These results allow grocers to target the consumer groups favourable to VGS and provide insights on the factors that can be manipulated via marketing strategies to reach these consumers.

Practical implications

Retailers are provided with insights on consumers behaviour that will allow them to target specific segments with shopping modalities.

Originality/value

This research investigated VGS, focussing on consumer learning as a socio-cultural influence as well as the consumer's technological readiness as an intention to adopt to this modality of shopping for food. These constructs have not been investigated by previous studies on food grocery shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 January 2023

Sunaina Gowan

Abstract

Details

The Ethnically Diverse Workplace: Experience of Immigrant Indian Professionals in Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-053-8

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

George B. Cunningham and Christina A. Rivera

The purpose of this paper is to (a) distinguish the structural designs, and (b) examine the relationship between structure and effectiveness in American sport organizations…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to (a) distinguish the structural designs, and (b) examine the relationship between structure and effectiveness in American sport organizations. Formalization, centralization, and specialization were examined to determine the structural designs. Senior level administrators from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I (N = 86) departments completed an electronic questionnaire. Cluster analysis was used to group departments according to the three dimensions of structure. Results demonstrated the presence of two structural designs—the Simple Structure and the Enabling Structure. MANCOVA procedures showed differences between departments in athletic achievement, but not in the education of student athletes. Discussion of the findings and future directions are presented.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Maria Sääksjärvi, Ellis van den Hende, Ruth Mugge and Nicolien van Peursem

This study aims to propose that a brand can be kept both prominent and fresh by using existing logos as well as logo varieties (i.e. slight modifications to the brand’s existing…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose that a brand can be kept both prominent and fresh by using existing logos as well as logo varieties (i.e. slight modifications to the brand’s existing logo).

Design/methodology/approach

In two experimental studies, the authors exposed respondents to either the existing brand logo or to logo varieties, and examined their influence on brand prominence and freshness.

Findings

The findings suggest that consumers subconsciously process logo varieties to which they are exposed in a similar way as they subconsciously process the existing logo of the brand, making both types of logo exposure effective for building brand prominence and freshness.

Research limitations/implications

It would also be worthwhile to study the effect of logo varieties using other dependent measures than the ones employed in this study, such as purchase intent and behavioral measures (such as consumption behaviors).

Practical implications

This research shows that logo varieties can be used alongside the existing brand logo to build prominence and freshness. These findings diverge from the findings typically reported in the branding literature that state that consumers resist changes to logos.

Originality/value

This research not only demonstrates that exposure to logo varieties and existing logos evokes automatic effects (both types of logos outperform a control group in fostering brand-related outcomes) but also confirms that exposing consumers to the existing logo or logo varieties give less differential effects than one may think.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of 110