Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Geraldine Rosa Henderson, Tracy Rank-Christman, Tiffany Barnett White, Kimberly Dillon Grantham, Amy L. Ostrom and John G. Lynch

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providers 

Abstract

Purpose

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providers’ ability to recognition faces of both black and white consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were administered to understand how intercultural competence impacts recognition of black and white consumer faces.

Findings

The authors find that the more intercultural competence that respondents report with blacks, the better they are at distinguishing between black regular customers and black new shoppers in an experiment. The authors find no impact of intercultural competence on the ability of respondents to differentiate between white consumers. These findings hold for respondents in the USA and South Africa.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this research is that the studies were conducted in a controlled lab setting. Thus, one could imagine additional noise from a true consumer setting might increase the effects of these results. Another limitation is the focus on only black and white consumer faces. In this paper, the authors focused on these two races, specifically to keep the factorial design as simplified as possible.

Originality/value

The implications of this research are important given that the ability of employees’ recognizing customer faces can affect customers’ day-to-day interactions in the marketplace.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Mathew Joseph, George W. Stone, Kimberly Grantham, Nukhet Harmancioglu and Essam Ibrahim

This exploratory study attempts to capture some of the principal benefits/factors attributable to service learning/community service projects, from a student perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study attempts to capture some of the principal benefits/factors attributable to service learning/community service projects, from a student perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 67 males and 83 females (16 graduate, 71 seniors, and 63 juniors) participated in the study.

Findings

Students believe that their college experience is preparing them for the job market, that critical thinking has been enhanced, and that their college academic experience has emphasized community service upon graduation.

Practical implications

The results increase one's knowledge of the benefits of service learning since so much emphasis is currently being placed on improving the critical thinking and problem‐solving ability of undergraduate business students.

Originality/value

Practitioners would be interested in understanding the impact that service learning can have on the problem‐solving ability of potential employees. If additional research could advance the proposition that students with service learning experience are generally superior in terms of their problem‐solving skills to students with no similar experience, then evidence of a service learning component on a student rĂ©sumĂ© suddenly adds value to the employer.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

John Dalrymple

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

1 – 3 of 3