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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Brian F. Blake, Steven Given, Kimberly A. Neuendorf and Michael Horvath

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to present a framework of five “facets,” i.e., distinct but complementary ways in which the observed appeal of a consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to present a framework of five “facets,” i.e., distinct but complementary ways in which the observed appeal of a consumer shopping site’s features can potentially be generalized across product/service domains (the authors call this framework the feature appeal generalization perspective); second, to determine if and how observed feature preferences for consumer electronics, bookstores, and sites “in general” generalize across domains; third, to test hypotheses about the impact of frequency of domain usage upon feature generalizability.

Design/methodology/approach

Via an online survey administered in a controlled laboratory setting, 313 respondents evaluated 26 website features in three domains (books, electronics, general) for a total of 24,414 preference judgments.

Findings

Two facets, individual feature values and within domain evaluative dimensions, revealed minimal generalizability, while there was moderate comparability across all domains in between domain feature correspondence. Personal preference elevation could be generalized between books and general, but not between these two and electronics. Differentiating dimensions showed that preferences were not generalizable from electronics to books and general because consumers wanted electronics features to provide “flashy sizzle” and books/general features to give “comfortable safety.” As hypothesized, patterns of generalizability coincided with frequency of domain usage.

Research limitations/implications

Practitioners should not apply published studies of feature appeal to their domain of interest unless those studies directly analyzed that domain. Scientists should incorporate all five facets in modeling what attracts consumers to commercial websites.

Originality/value

This is the first multidimensional analysis of the generalizability of site feature appeal across business-to-consumer product/service domains, and the first to propose this integrated evaluative framework with its unique facets.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Brian F. Blake, Kimberly A. Neuendorf and Colin M. Valdiserri

A survey of 208 US Midwestern Internet users reveals, first, that the nature of Internet dhopping (IS) is a function of consumers’ domain specific IS Innovativeness, not…

Abstract

A survey of 208 US Midwestern Internet users reveals, first, that the nature of Internet dhopping (IS) is a function of consumers’ domain specific IS Innovativeness, not only in regard to product purchasing (as has been previously observed) but also to visiting sites for product information. Second, IS innovativeness is positively associated with the variety of product classes shopped online, and this association is stronger with popular than with unpopular product classes. Third, the impact of IS innovativeness is in addition to, and not simply a reflection of, the positive contribution to online shopping made by the prevalence of online shopping in one’s social setting. Fourth, when IS innovativeness is uncontrolled, apparent support is found for previous contentions that online shopping is greater among those with more extensive Internet experience. However, when IS innovativeness is considered, the predictive ability of Internet experience decreases, in some cases to nonsignificance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Deepika Pandita

This research paper focuses on the arriving new generation, “Gen Z,” and how an organization can target this new talent through innovation in its employer branding. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper focuses on the arriving new generation, “Gen Z,” and how an organization can target this new talent through innovation in its employer branding. This paper aims to enhance the readers’ understanding of how generation Z is different from the previous generations and their unique preferences. This study also attempts to probe and help readers understand innovative practices in employer branding and what tools can be used under this umbrella to influence and attract the increasing workforce of generation Z to the labor market.

Design/methodology/approach

There were 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews taken from human resources (HR) heads of various organizations, a few mid-managers, consultants and HR experts based in India. Each interview was transcribed, and a technique of inductive content analysis was used. Broad themes and several new items emerged that looked at innovation in employer branding.

Findings

It was found through this study that Gen Z has high career aspirations, working styles, attributes, education preferences and has an innovative mindset. This demands a flexibility of being independent and confident. They prefer diversity not just through race and gender but also through identity and orientation. Most important, money is not the only priority for them when it comes to their career development. They also want themselves to be associates with a workplace exhibiting community support. They are driven by an innovative mindset where they resort to creative means to achieve their goals.

Research limitations/implications

The research paper is exploratory. The model and hypotheses the author arrives at must be verified empirically by collecting primary data through validated instruments by the relevant stakeholders in the organization, specifically the stakeholders specializing in the domain of talent acquisition and talent management, to add additional weight and meaning to the literature.

Practical implications

As the members of Gen Z are about to step into the labor market, the proposed finding in this research paper would help current industrial practitioners rethink how they will design their policies to entice and integrate Gen Z into the workplace.

Originality/value

Realizing that companies’ experience with millennials’ entry into the workforce might not have prepared them to win with Gen Z, the author has examined what makes Gen Z different from earlier cohorts on how do they approach the workplace. Understanding the unique behavioral differences, the author has proposed organizations’ practices to appeal to them to work with them. Adding to the existing literature on “Generation Z” and “Employer Branding,” the author has linked both in the paper with a qualitative study and proposed a model to build Generation Z’s employer brand.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Beena Salim Saji and Paul Ellingstad

The purpose of this paper is to develop a social innovation model and understand the levels of communication of different social actors at different points of a social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a social innovation model and understand the levels of communication of different social actors at different points of a social innovation project (at Hewlett Packard). The paper also looks into the effect of communication networks and power of words in social interaction in social innovation projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines social innovation in the first part and how it differs from social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility and social business. The research focusses on the data available through the internet and the papers and articles related to social innovation experience of technology companies. A content analysis of the terminology that is used for social innovation projects during innovation process and the articles published will be the primary source for data analysis in the study.

Findings

The study did illuminate the power of certain words that are repeatedly used in e-mails and articles, related to the social innovation which can give researchers an idea about the power of words in social innovation.

Research limitations/implications

It is important for human resource managers and innovation leaders to look at innovation from the social motivational process and more strategic perspective rather than just from the science and technology perspective. The study concludes with the development of a model and partnership communication analysis for successful social innovation projects.

Originality/value

The research will add value to the area of social innovation by looking into the importance of concepts and words used in social innovation. The study is looking into a new perspective of social marketing which is the power of words in a social innovation project.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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