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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Kim Lombard, Laura Desmond, Ciara Phelan and Joan Brangan

As one ages, the risk of experiencing a fall increases and poses a number of serious consequences; 30 per cent of individuals over 65 years of age fall each year…

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2110

Abstract

Purpose

As one ages, the risk of experiencing a fall increases and poses a number of serious consequences; 30 per cent of individuals over 65 years of age fall each year. Evidence-based falls prevention programmes demonstrate efficacy in reducing the rate and risk of falls among older adults, but their use in Irish occupational therapy practice is unknown. This study aims to investigate the implementation of falls prevention programmes by occupational therapists working with older adults in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was used to gather data on the use of falls prevention programmes among occupational therapists working with older adults in any clinical setting across Ireland. Purposeful, convenience and snowball sampling methods were used. The Association of Occupational Therapists of Ireland acted as a gatekeeper. Descriptive statistics and summative content analysis were used to analyse quantitative and qualitative data, respectively.

Findings

In all, 85 survey responses were analysed. Over 85 per cent of respondents reported “Never” using any of the evidence-based falls prevention programmes. The “OTAGO” Exercise Programme was the most “Frequently” used programme (9.5 per cent, n = 7); 29 respondents reported using “in-department” developed falls prevention programmes and 14 provided additional comments regarding current falls prevention practices in Ireland.

Originality/value

In the absence of Irish data on the subject, this study provides a benchmark to describe the use of evidence-based falls programmes by Irish occupational therapists with older adults.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Inma Rodríguez-Ardura and Antoni Meseguer-Artola

Recent research on immersive experiences in online environments for higher education has attributed a fundamental role to two distinct yet connected psychological…

Abstract

Recent research on immersive experiences in online environments for higher education has attributed a fundamental role to two distinct yet connected psychological phenomena: the feelings of being virtually present in the education environment, often simply called presence, and peak episodes of flow. The authors conceptually delimitate these two psychological facets of e-learners’ experiences and examine their interplay. The authors show how flow episodes are elicited by students’ sense of control over the online education environment, their attention being focussed on the learning tasks, and their feelings of being physically placed in the online education setting. Also, the interactivity created by the online education environment evokes an e-learner’s imagery, which in turn triggers presence feelings and episodes of flow. The authors further show that, although presence and flow are triggered by some common antecedents, they differ in the object of the individual’s immersion, and that presence feelings facilitate flow. Moreover, the authors provide practical recommendations for higher education institutions, policy makers and the academic and information and communication technology community involved in e-learning, to make sure e-learner experiences reach their fullest potential.

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Seunghyun Brian Park and Kwangsoo Park

The purpose of this study is to develop research theme categories, investigate thematic trends between 1998 and 2013 and present changes in event management research topics.

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5126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop research theme categories, investigate thematic trends between 1998 and 2013 and present changes in event management research topics.

Design/methodology/approach

The coding instrument was developed for thematic analysis of 592 articles in four event management research journals and 106 event management articles in top-tier hospitality and tourism management (H&T) journals. Various intercoder reliability indices were calculated to ensure credibility of content analysis.

Findings

Major domains of research themes were identified across different periods and journals. Themes differed not only between the event management-focused journals and the hospitality and tourism (H&T) journals but also in different periods (1998-2003, 2004-2008 and 2009-2013).

Originality/value

First, this study analyzed all articles published in journals focusing on event management as well as event management research published in the H&T journals. Second, this paper improved the credibility of thematic analysis by developing a coding instrument of research themes and by reporting intercoder reliability. Third, this research captured changes in popularity of research themes of different periods and distinct research realms (event management journals versus H&T journals).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Magnus Söderlund, Jonas Colliander and Stefan Szugalski

This paper aims to examine if the response device (smartphone vs computer) used by participants in online data collections affects their responses. The screens of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine if the response device (smartphone vs computer) used by participants in online data collections affects their responses. The screens of smartphones and computers differ in size, and the main hypothesis here is that screen size is likely to be influential when stimuli with aesthetic qualities are shown on the screen.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments, in which pictures of food items were used as stimuli, were conducted. In each experiment, the screen size of the participants’ devices used for the responses was a measured factor.

Findings

Participants with large screen devices responded with a higher level of (a) positive emotions and (b) attractiveness perceptions than participants with small screen devices.

Practical implications

The results highlight that the participant’s device can be a confounding factor in research projects comprising online data collections. Screen size thereby represents an additional factor calling for caution in the “exodus to cyberspace” that characterizes many contemporary researchers’ data collection activities.

Originality/value

When data are collected online, participants’ can use devices that differ in terms of screen size (e.g. smartphones, tablets and computers), but the impact of this factor on consumer behavior-related response variables has hitherto not been examined in existing research.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Chae Mi Lim and Youn-Kyung Kim

The purpose of this paper is to identify the emotional factors that affect older consumers’ satisfaction with TV shopping and examined the relationships among these factors.

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1480

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the emotional factors that affect older consumers’ satisfaction with TV shopping and examined the relationships among these factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 285 consumers aged 60 years and older who had watched a TV home shopping channel was used. Structural equation modeling (SEM) examined the relationships among emotional factors that affect satisfaction.

Findings

This study found that loneliness was an antecedent of both gratification shopping motivation and telepresence and that telepresence positively affected consumer satisfaction with TV shopping.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study validate social-compensation motive of media consumption and deficiency paradigm in the context of TV shopping. The relationship between telepresence and satisfaction also supported transportation theory. However, the findings of the current study should be interpreted with caution due to the non-random sampling method. Constructs other than those employed in this study could be examined regarding outcomes of loneliness.

Practical implications

This study suggested that telepresence and shopping for self-gratification are effective ways to alleviate older consumers’ loneliness. In addition, the findings from relationships among emotional variables suggested potential marketing strategies for shaping positive consumer attitudes toward and satisfaction with TV shopping networks.

Originality/value

This study extended knowledge on loneliness by demonstrating how it related to attitudinal outcomes such as satisfaction and knowledge on telepresence by examining it in the context of TV shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Paul Blaise Issock Issock, Mercy Mpinganjira and Mornay Roberts-Lombard

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of consumption values, green customer satisfaction and customer trust in energy-efficient labels on green customer…

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1055

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of consumption values, green customer satisfaction and customer trust in energy-efficient labels on green customer loyalty and positive word of mouth (PWOM) towards energy-efficient products, and how environmental knowledge moderates these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was followed using a cross-sectional design. Data were collected from 440 consumers in South Africa, who used electronic home appliances that have energy efficiency labels. A structural equation model and a multigroup analysis were used to test the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The results revealed that consumption values partially influence green customer satisfaction, which, in turn, affect green customer trust and loyalty, and PWOM. Environmental knowledge only marginally moderates the relationships in the model.

Practical implications

Green marketing practitioners should work on improving green customer satisfaction, which is central to a sustainable green consumption lifestyle.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this study is through the application of a multidimensional approach to testing the impact of consumption values on green customer satisfaction. Moreover, this paper provides greater clarity on the specific determinants of PWOM and examines the interplay between green customer loyalty and positive word of mouth towards green products. Furthermore, the moderating effect of environmental knowledge on the relationships in the proposed model is explained.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Paul Blaise Issock Issock, Mercy Mpinganjira and Mornay Roberts-Lombard

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a response to the ongoing debate about the (in)compatibility of the traditional marketing mix (the 4Ps) in the field of social marketing. In doing so, this study examines the important role that the stages of behaviour change play in influencing the effectiveness of traditional marketing mix elements in the context of recycling in South African households.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a quantitative method, relying on a survey of 699 heads of households in South Africa. Multigroup analysis and structural equation modelling were applied to test the impact of stages of changes on the potential effect of marketing mix elements on the intention to recycle household waste.

Findings

The results established that although the traditional marketing mix elements have a marginal effect on the intention to recycle household waste, further analyses revealed that this impact of the marketing mix is contingent on the stage of change in which the target audience is found. Thus, the findings indicated that the marketing mix elements significantly influence the intention to recycle when the target audience is at the contemplation and preparation phases.

Originality/value

Whilst both critics and proponents of the adoption of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing initiatives have provided relevant arguments, the debate had remained largely theoretical. This study discusses the limitations of the traditional marketing mix in behaviour change programmes and the need for a segmented approach based on the stages of behaviour change when using the 4Ps. However, given the hegemony of the 4Ps in the social marketing literature, this study sheds light on the appropriate “Ps” to activate to influence recycling behavioural intention at different stages of change.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Chi-Lun Liu

Check-in based advertising is growing dramatically as the popularity of social media increases. The purpose of this paper is to explore which social cues are appropriate…

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1478

Abstract

Purpose

Check-in based advertising is growing dramatically as the popularity of social media increases. The purpose of this paper is to explore which social cues are appropriate for check-in based advertising in social media based on media richness theory and how content effectiveness affects content generation intention based on achievement motivation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment was performed to evaluate the effects of social cue strategies on content effectiveness of attitude toward the ad and self-efficacy on recall. The influence of effectiveness on content generation intention are also measured in the experiment.

Findings

The results of a laboratory experiment indicated that a strategy of using plentiful social cues has high effectiveness as measured by the concept of attitude toward the ad. Content effectiveness measured by attitude toward the ad and self-efficacy on recall can directly affect user intentions to generating check-in based advertisements.

Research limitations/implications

Although check-in based advertising is driven by the customers themselves rather than by the company, companies can encourage their customers to follow an appropriate check-in content generation strategy to improve effectiveness.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide useful information for designing the content of social media designed to facilitate the promotion of products and companies in online marketing.

Originality/value

In theoretical contribution, this study integrates media richness theory and achievement motivation theory to explore how users intent to generate check-in advertising according to social cues effectiveness.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2021

Rejikumar G, Ajay Jose, Sonia Mathew, Dony Peter Chacko and Aswathy Asokan-Ajitha

Social television (Social TV) viewing of live sports events is an emerging trend. The realm of transformative service research (TSR) envisions that every service…

Abstract

Purpose

Social television (Social TV) viewing of live sports events is an emerging trend. The realm of transformative service research (TSR) envisions that every service consumption experience must lead to consumer well-being. Currently, a full appreciation of the well-being factors obtained through Social TV viewing is lacking. This study aims to gain a holistic understanding of the concept of digital sports well-being obtained through live Social TV viewing of sports events.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group interviews were used to collect data from the 40 regular sports viewers, and the qualitative data obtained is analyzed thematically using NVivo 12. A post hoc verification of the identified themes is done to narrow down the most critical themes.

Findings

The exploration helped understand the concept of digital sports well-being (DSW) obtained through live Social TV sports spectating and identified five critical themes that constitute its formation. The themes that emerged were virtual connectedness, vividness, uncertainty reduction, online disinhibition and perceived autonomy. This study defines the concept and develops a conceptual model for DSW.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the body of knowledge in TSR, transformative sport service research, digital customer engagement, value co-creation in digital platforms, self-determination theory and flow theory. The qualitative study is exploratory, with participants’ views based on a single match in one particular sport, and as such, its findings are restrained by the small sample size and the specific sport. To extend this study’s implications, empirical research involving a larger and more diversified sample involving multiple sports Social TV viewing experiences would help better understand the DSW concept.

Practical implications

The research provides insights to Social TV live streamers of sporting events and digital media marketers about the DSW construct and identifies the valued DSW dimensions that could provide a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the exploration is the first attempt to describe the concept of DSW and identify associated themes.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Daniel Lombard

Interpersonal skills are increasingly important tools in long-term care with older people, especially against the backdrop of loneliness affecting older people and…

Abstract

Purpose

Interpersonal skills are increasingly important tools in long-term care with older people, especially against the backdrop of loneliness affecting older people and expectations for a person-centred, joined-up approach. However, the term is used as a composite and its definition lacks shape and focus. In existing literature, participants appear to be selected on the basis of specific illnesses rather than age. Better understanding of the features of everyday communication processes associated with person-centred care can lead to improvements in policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review examined communication features associated with person-centred care for older adults. This identified the extent and nature of literature. Several databases were searched; after screening and hand-searching, 31 were included. Findings were analysed for patterns and contradictions, against the objectives of person-centred and integrated care.

Findings

Emotional intelligence and the ability to employ various communication styles are crucial skills of person-centred communication. Such approaches can have positive effects on the well-being of older people.

Research limitations/implications

Some studies' validity was weakened by methodological designs being founded on value judgements.

Practical implications

Using personalised greetings alongside verbal and non-verbal prompts to keep residents emotionally connected during personal care is considered good practice. Stimulating feedback from people using services and their relatives is important.

Originality/value

The role of communication is highlighted in many professional guidance documents on person-centred and integrated care, but the process of implementation is decentralised to individual employers and workers. This paper draws on the findings of contemporary literature, grounded in naturalistic data, with implications for practice and policy.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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