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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Kim Choy Chung

Although East Asia and South East Asia have seen growth in mobile commerce activities, the uptake of such activities in Central Asia has been relatively low. For insight…

Abstract

Purpose

Although East Asia and South East Asia have seen growth in mobile commerce activities, the uptake of such activities in Central Asia has been relatively low. For insight, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of culture, innovation characteristics and concerns about order fulfillment on mobile commerce (shopping) intention in Central Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 779 questionnaires were collected (via mall-intercept method) from cities in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. The data were then subjected to two-step structural equation modeling procedures (using SPSS AMOS V.25) for hypothesis testing.

Findings

This study revealed that innovation characteristics, system-based trust (trust in mobile technology), and concerns about order fulfillment affected mobile commerce intention in Central Asia. The strong uncertainty avoidance characteristics of societies in the region mean potential adoptee place great emphasis on trialability and security of mobile commerce. Uncertainty avoidance correlated strongly with concerns about order fulfillment, thereby significantly impacting mobile commerce intention. Power distance and collectivism correlated with observability as factors affecting mobile commerce intention. The innovation characteristics of compatibility, complexity and relative advantage directly impact mobile commerce intention in Central Asia.

Research limitations/implications

There are several limitations in this paper. First, the data in this study are limited to Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. This might affect the generalization of this study’s findings across the whole Central Asia region. Second, the respondents in this study are exposed to mobile shopping for less than 30 min before been asked to complete the survey. This might affect respondent’s confidence in mobile commerce. Future study might involve the rest of Central Asia (Tajikistan, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan). Future study might also want to investigate the impact of Web assurance seal on mobile commerce intention in Central Asia.

Practical implications

Managerial/marketing implications and recommended strategies in this study would be useful for businesses (aspirant e-vendors) in Central Asia.

Originality/value

There is limited study about mobile commerce in Central Asia. Furthermore, extant literature on mobile commerce in the region lacked age varieties or lacked multi-national and logistical perspective. This is important given the wide geographical spread of the region. This study addressed these gaps by collecting data from all segments of society in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan to test propositions regarding innovation characteristics, culture, and concerns about order fulfillment as factors impacting mobile commerce intention in Central Asia.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

KimChoy Chung, Kim‐Shyan Fam and David K. Holdsworth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the following choice issues among young consumers (Generation Y): how cultural values influence a student's decision on study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the following choice issues among young consumers (Generation Y): how cultural values influence a student's decision on study destinations, and how cultural values influence student's preferred sources of information for university choice?

Design/methodology/approach

High school students from Singapore and Malaysia, intending to study in New Zealand were surveyed with an instrument based on Schwartz's Value Survey and the understanding that cultural values are a powerful force shaping consumers' motivations, lifestyles and product choices.

Findings

The results of this research suggests that cultural values have an impact on student's intended choice of international tertiary education and their preferred sources of information for university enrolment. The results have important implications for marketers of export education.

Originality/value

There are few studies which try to understand how cultural values influence a student's decision on study destinations and their preferred sources of information for university choice.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

KimChoy Chung, David K. Holdsworth, Yongqiang Li and Kim‐Shyan Fam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Chinese cultural values influence “Little Emperors'” choice of study destination; and their preferred communication sources…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Chinese cultural values influence “Little Emperors'” choice of study destination; and their preferred communication sources for university choice.

Design/methodology/approach

University students from the People's Republic of China (PRC) in New Zealand were surveyed with an instrument based on Schwartz's “Values survey” and the understanding that cultural values are a powerful force shaping consumers' motivations, lifestyles and product choices. A central‐location (libraries, lecture theatres) sampling strategy was employed.

Findings

The results from the research suggest that Chinese cultural values have an impact on “Little Emperor's” choice of international tertiary education and their preferred communication sources for university choice. The study shows that New Zealand society appeals for its low corruption and high level of honesty and fairness which are attractive to these “Little Emperors” because these values help to reinforce group harmony, a prominent characteristic of Chinese society. The “Little Emperor's” preference for using education fairs, university open days and representative agents as sources of information for university enrolment is consistent with the high context nature of Chinese society.

Originality/value

Few studies have attempted to understand how cultural values influence young Chinese students' decisions on study destinations and their preferred communication sources for university choice.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

KimChoy Chung and David K. Holdsworth

This study aims to investigate perceived risk and trustworthiness in relationship to the diffusion of innovation theory to understand the determinants of behavioural…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate perceived risk and trustworthiness in relationship to the diffusion of innovation theory to understand the determinants of behavioural intent to adopt mobile commerce among the Y Generation. It also seeks to investigate the impact of culture on mobile commerce adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Five hundred and thirty randomly distributed questionnaires in six tertiary education institutions in Kazakhstan, Morocco and Singapore were used. Multivariate analysis of variance was conducted using SPSS and structural equation modelling using AMOS 7.0 to test for construct validity and for hypothesis testing.

Findings

Perceived risk, trustworthiness and Rogers' five perceived characteristics of innovation (namely, observability, trialability, compatibility, complexity, relative advantage) determined behavioural intent to adopt mobile commerce among the Y Generation. Culture had a moderating effect on these determinants in Kazakhstan and Morocco.

Research limitations/implications

This study has not yet explored cost, goods offerings and payment systems that may influence users' intention to adopt mobile commerce. Differential experience of respondents with different mobile portals would have differential effect on the perceived ease of use of mobile commerce, affecting the result of this study.

Practical implications

This study suggested that the Y Generation are concerned about privacy violation and risk associated with mobile commerce. Mobile service providers should consider trials and permission‐based mobile marketing to imbue trust in mobile commerce.

Originality/value

This study integrates trustworthiness and perceived risk with Rogers' DOI innovation characteristics, resulting in greater understanding of the behavioral intent to adopt mobile commerce among the Y Generation. Further, few studies delved into the comparative impact of culture on the behaviour intent to adopt mobile commerce among the Y Generation in Asian and African countries.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

A.L. Müller

Outlines the process, which commenced at least a century ago, during which appropriate prerequisites for rapid growth were established. Explains that, by 1960, Korea…

Abstract

Outlines the process, which commenced at least a century ago, during which appropriate prerequisites for rapid growth were established. Explains that, by 1960, Korea already possessed a semi‐developed economy, in terms of physical infrastructure, economic and financial institutions and human resources, and that, given the country’s paucity of natural resources, its human capital had to be the main fount of economic growth. Notes that, in this respect, it was well‐endowed with both a substantial body of vigorous entrepreneurs and an abundant supply of industrious workers, and that levels of education and training were also rising rapidly. Describes how the population’s receptivity to change and desire for modernization had been kindled by various foreign influences, including the long period of Japanese colonization, the Second World War, the post‐war American presence and the Korean War. Details how, after this war, the continued military threat from the north underlined the need for rapid industrialization, and how, against this background, President Park triggered rapid growth based on export‐oriented industrialization.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Arpita Khare and Geetika Varshneya

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a survey carried out in three major metropolitan cities and a sample of total 889 respondents was collected who were college students in India.

Findings

Past environment-friendly behaviour influenced Indian youth’s organic clothing purchase behaviour. Green apparel knowledge and peer influence, interestingly, had no impact on organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited to students who had past experience with green products. This was deliberately done as the objective was to examine the influence of past environment-friendly behaviour and green apparel knowledge on organic clothing purchase behaviour. Youth with limited awareness about organic clothing were not contacted. This restricted the findings to a specific youth segment. Further, the study was limited to Indian youth and did not examine the purchase behaviour of other consumer segments. Demographic variables were not used for analysis as only purchase behaviour of young people as a consumer segment was studied.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by organic apparel manufacturers in marketing organic clothing brands to the Indian youth. Organic clothing can be positioned to emphasise green values and distinct lifestyle for environment-conscious youths. Initiatives like celebrity talk-shows, organic clothing exhibitions, and launch of organic clothing designer brands can be used to promote organic apparel. College students can be used as opinion leaders to communicate benefits of organic clothing and inculcate green values among larger population.

Originality/value

Organic products and brands are becoming popular among Indian consumers. There has been limited research on the subject of youths’ purchase behaviour of organic clothing to date. Companies trying to launch organic clothing brands in the country may find the results helpful in understanding green buying behaviour.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

K.L. Choy, Harry K.H. Chow, W.B. Lee and Felix T.S. Chan

To develop a performance measurement system (PMS) in the application of supplier relationship management operated under a supply chain benchmarking framework. Acting as a…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a performance measurement system (PMS) in the application of supplier relationship management operated under a supply chain benchmarking framework. Acting as a monitoring tool for evaluating the performance of maintenance logistics providers against the defined performance levels stated in the contract, and facilitating the application of benchmarking approach in maintenance logistics activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A six tiers collaborative management model is designed in building the PMS, by which information sharing of performance history of suppliers is made possible. By following the work flow of the PMS, performance of suppliers is benchmarked with the best‐in‐class supplier, resulting in the identification of the most appropriate supplier for the particular requirement.

Findings

PMS helps a company and its suppliers to understand the performance gap between its service levels with the best‐in‐class practice. The resulting performance gap provides valuable information in the formulating of a new supply chain and strategic plan in solving problems and challenges in aviation industry. By means of PMS, a company can make decisions with the basis of a good relationship with its business partners, especially in the maintenance logistics area.

Research limitations/implications

The design of PMS must take into consideration of the data sources, the duration of taking the required data, and the focal point on collecting information. Moreover, findings from the study have to be revised every two years.

Originality/value

By applying PMS in one of the leading airlines in Hong Kong, suppliers' deficiencies in the logistics performance are identified easily. Moreover, current operational service level is effectively enhanced and the combination of the best‐in‐class supplier service package is accurately selected.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Walter W.C. Chung, Kim Hua Tan and S.C. Lenny Koh

Abstract

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Ying Kei Tse, Kim Hua Tan, Sai Ho Chung and Ming Kim Lim

The rise of recent product recalls reveals that manufacturing firms are particularly vulnerable to product quality and safety where goods and materials have been sourced…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of recent product recalls reveals that manufacturing firms are particularly vulnerable to product quality and safety where goods and materials have been sourced globally. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues of quality and safety problems in global supply networks, and introduce a supply chain risk management (SCRM) framework to reduce the quality risk.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual SCRM framework for mitigating quality risk is developed. In addition, four SCRM treatment practices are proposed by consolidating the empirical literature in the operations management and supply chain management areas. The general feasibility was discussed based on literature.

Findings

The research has identified the root causes of the recent product recalls and a series of product harm scandals ranging from automobiles to unsafe toys. Supply chains are extended by outsourcing and stretched by globalization, which greatly increase the complexity of supply networks and decrease the visibility in risk and operation processes.

Originality/value

The paper identifies four SCRM practices, and proposes two distinct antecedents that can prompt the effectiveness of SCRM.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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