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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Helena Garcia Carrizosa, Kieron Sheehy, Jonathan Rix, Jane Seale and Simon Hayhoe

This paper aims to report the findings of a systematized literature review focusing on participatory research and accessibly in the context of assistive technologies…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the findings of a systematized literature review focusing on participatory research and accessibly in the context of assistive technologies, developed for use within museums by people with sensory impairments or a learning disability. The extent and nature of participatory research that occurs within the creation of technologies to facilitate accessible museum experiences is uncertain, and this is therefore a focus of this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a systematized literature review and subsequent thematic analysis.

Findings

A screening of 294 research papers produced 8 papers for analysis in detail. A thematic analysis identified that the concept of accessibly has nuanced meanings, underpinned by social values; the attractiveness of a technology is important in supporting real-life usability; and that the conceptualization of participation should extend beyond the end users.

Social implications

The argument is made that increasing the participation of people with sensory impairments and learning disabilities in the research process will benefit the design of technologies that facilitate accessibility for these groups.

Originality/value

An original notion of participation has emerged from this review. It includes the participation and goals of disabled people but has expanded the concept to encompass museum personnel and indeed the physical and social spaces of the museums and heritage sites themselves. This constructs a broad of participation, with different aspects being reflected across the review’s research papers.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Paul Herring, Karen Kear, Kieron Sheehy and Roger Jones

The picture exchange communication system (PECS) is an established communication intervention for non-verbal children with autism. The purpose of this paper is to present…

Abstract

Purpose

The picture exchange communication system (PECS) is an established communication intervention for non-verbal children with autism. The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of a computer-based PECS approach, in which young non-verbal children with autism respond to an on-screen “virtual tutor” through the manipulation of picture/symbol cards. The paper presents research to investigate how the virtual tutor’s voice influences the children’s participation and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight non-verbal children between six and nine years old and with a diagnosis of autism were presented with a series of computer-based activities, using a virtual tutor with either a natural or synthetic voice, in two separate sessions. Data were gathered using a within-participants counterbalanced design to control against variations between individuals and effects of presentation order.

Findings

Analysis of the children’s responses suggest that they were able to use the system more effectively when the virtual tutor had a synthetic voice, rather than a human voice. The findings demonstrate that a computer-based virtual tutor can provide an engaging method of supporting symbol-based communication for non-verbal children with autism, and that a synthetic voice type was preferable for the sessions undertaken.

Originality/value

Investigations of voice type and its influence on non-verbal children’s participation and performance have so far provided inconclusive results (Ramdoss, 2013). This research suggests that the voice type is an important feature of the learning experience of non-verbal children with autism, and can have a significant influence on their participation and performance in virtual tutor-led learning.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Kieron Sheehy

The origin of this chapter lies in a presentation by a colleague whose work I admire. Drawing on their extensive experience, they have developed guidance for schools to…

Abstract

The origin of this chapter lies in a presentation by a colleague whose work I admire. Drawing on their extensive experience, they have developed guidance for schools to support children with special educational needs. Their conclusion was that teachers could adopt an eclectic approach, utilizing and combining different interventions as appropriate. The notion of utilizing different teaching approaches to facilitate inclusive education seemed accepted as unproblematic. However, I began to wonder about what happens when teaching approaches are based on conflicting views about the nature of how children learn. This led me to consider a more fundamental question. Do teachers’ own beliefs about how knowledge is created and how children develop (their personal epistemological beliefs) have an impact on their practice and children’s experiences in inclusive classrooms? Answering this question leads to the ethical issue of whether all ways of thinking about how children learn are compatible with teaching in inclusive schools, and the consequences that arise in seeking an answer.

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Kieron Sheehy, Rajni Kumrai and Martin Woodhead

The paper aims to explore young people's experiences of having access to personal advisors (PAs), from Connexions, a support and guidance service.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore young people's experiences of having access to personal advisors (PAs), from Connexions, a support and guidance service.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted, in two phases, with young people in a large new town. Thematic analysis highlighted significant issues and suggested factors that might differentiate between those in employment, education and training and those not in this position.

Findings

Young people's relationship with their Connexions PA emerged as a significant factor in mediating the extent to which they used the service as a “portal” to opportunities and resources. For some young people faced with complex and challenging circumstances, the relationship with their PA provided a uniquely stable and valued source of support.

Research limitations/implications

Although drawn from a small and focused sample, the results suggests that the large‐scale cuts to the service, currently underway, could have a significant impact on young people in difficult circumstances.

Practical implications

The identity of the Connexions service creates issues of access for potential service users.

Originality/value

The research illustrates the positive impact that PAs can have in the complex and challenging situations which some young people encounter. It highlights the nature of the relationship developed with PA as a key issue in facilitating positive changes in the lives of young people. It also suggest that the categories of not in education, employment and training and education, employment and training are too simplistic as descriptors of the young peoples lives or the work undertaken with them by PAs.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Natalia Kucirkova

Abstract

Details

The Future of the Self: Understanding Personalization in Childhood and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-945-0

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Sarah Parsons and John Woolham

568

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

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