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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Abstract

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2013

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

Ron Coughlin and Tom Wong

Outlines how analysing the way that children think ‐ and shop ‐ will help brand managers and marketers. Focuses on the Strottman Kid Engineers, a US project which gave…

Abstract

Outlines how analysing the way that children think ‐ and shop ‐ will help brand managers and marketers. Focuses on the Strottman Kid Engineers, a US project which gave children from ages 6 to 9 headbands containing video cameras, and assigned them to grocery stores, where they would choose the 20 items they most wanted. Discusses the results: promotions were important, and visual rather than verbal promotional communication was popular; children expect and appreciate innovation in the grocery store; favoured hot‐spots were the cereal, snacks and dairy aisles, plus lunchables; children were influenced by in‐store signage; and the draw of licensed properties is stronger than ever.

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Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Virginie Silhouette-Dercourt and Christel de Lassus

The purpose of this paper is to focus on mothers as key influencers in luxury retailing contexts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on mothers as key influencers in luxury retailing contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a semiotic interpretation of mothers’ discourses, the authors underline the identity motivations for purchasing luxury apparel for their pre-adolescent children.

Findings

The paper shows that when shopping for luxury brands for their pre-adolescent children, mothers manage discrepancies between their “real” and “idealised” selves as well as the pushes and pulls of being a mother and a woman.

Research limitations/implications

The findings point to possible future research on this topic, particularly with regard to investigating how luxury stores and retailers can adapt so as to satisfy mothers’ identity quest.

Practical implications

Managers of luxury brand retail spaces looking at the future of retailing could analyse their store environment in the light of these mothers’ identity-related motivations. As well as focussing on how children look, store layout and merchandising should provide different spaces for mothers’ identity expression, using new in-store digital technologies.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to analyse luxury shopping for children taking the point of view of mothers. The paper underlines how young mothers build their new maternal identity and their projected relationship with their child through purchases of children’s luxury goods in specific retail environments.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Brigitte de Faultrier

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Brigitte de Faultrier

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Monali Hota and Maud Derbaix

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether children’s online play and participation in massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) is leading to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether children’s online play and participation in massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) is leading to the development of virtual retail shopping motivations and behaviours. This exploratory study also examines the influence of age-related differences in children’s social and consumer development vs adults and gender on this.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using two focus groups and ten in-depth interviews with 20 French children between the ages of eight and 12 years.

Findings

Results show that children’s online play and participation in MMORPG communities is leading to the development of virtual retail shopping motivations and behaviour through the purchase of virtual tools and accessories by all children using virtual in-game money. But these motivations are very gender specific due to the overarching importance of gender-specific motivations for achievement. Boys engage in virtual retail shopping because they need in-game progress and power gains, while girls engage in virtual retail shopping because they need social status enhancement.

Research limitations/implications

Research should be conducted on children in different age groups. All aspects of the process and consequences of children’s participation in online gaming communities should be examined more comprehensively. Quantitative research is required. Results may also vary with country and cultural context.

Practical implications

First, children between eight and 12 years of age are active consumers (influencers and buyers) for all companies. MMORPGs provide the perfect setting for better understanding of children’s motivations and behaviour regarding virtual retail shopping because they provide virtual in-game money for different achievements that children use to engage in such behaviour. Second, MMORPG companies can benefit by taking into account gender differences in children’s motivations and the importance of the games’ social dimensions and interactions when designing the games.

Social implications

First, the risks of playing computer games for children in terms of playing violent games and leading a virtual life must be considered and studied carefully by public policy officials. Second, public policy officials that look into online gaming should take into account gender differences in children’s motivations and the importance of the games’ social dimensions and interactions when monitoring online games. These are issues that are not only developing children’s abilities as social actors but may well be promoting excessive materialism aided by the formation of online peer groups.

Originality/value

This is the first study on children’s online play and participation in MMORPGs in the consumer context and will help us to understand children’s mind-set and motivations for retail activities in this unique retail setting. The study results show that children’s online play and participation in MMORPGs is leading to the development of virtual retail shopping motivations and behaviour that are very gender specific unlike adults.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Frances Gunn, Anna Cappuccitti and Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

The purpose of this study is to investigate patterns in the social construction of occupational jurisdiction and related professional career identity. It examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate patterns in the social construction of occupational jurisdiction and related professional career identity. It examines the agency associated with framing messages that influence perceptions about the professional nature and value of retail management careers. The aim is to identify sources which produce influential messages about perceptions about retail management careers and the content of these messages.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises a qualitative research methodology (focus-group interviews) to explore the observations of people involved with the monitoring and management of career messages. Two focus groups were conducted with a) nine Canadian retail practitioners and b) seven post-secondary educators from retail management education programmes.

Findings

The focus groups identify five sources of influential messages including (1) part-time retail work experience, (2) educational institutions, (3) parents, (4) retail industry/practitioners and (5) media. They also identify three content themes presented by these sources including (1) the importance of educational requirements, (2) the nature of occupational roles and (3) the value of the career.

Research limitations/implications

The significance and generalisability of the results are limited by the size and nature of the sample.

Practical implications

This study makes a practical contribution by identifying potential career awareness strategies.

Originality/value

This research makes a theoretical contribution by expanding understanding of the role of communication with career perceptions and with the related constitution of career professionalisation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Maria D. De-Juan-Vigaray and Monali Hota

The purpose of this paper is to see how children aged 7–11 years can become the actors of tomorrow’s hypermarket experience by providing a review of past research on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to see how children aged 7–11 years can become the actors of tomorrow’s hypermarket experience by providing a review of past research on children as retail consumers, with a specific reference to their customer experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review will be organised by presenting a “child hypermarket customer experience” model. Finally, a conceptual and methodological critique of past research will be presented followed by the revised model and conclusions.

Findings

The literature review finds six independent variables presented in the model: customer satisfaction, in-store conflicts, buying intention, purchase basket value, loyalty and average time spent in store measure a positive hypermarket shopping experience for children. There are then six types of mediators presented in the updated model: type of product, product offering, pocket money amount, environment, technology (games, tablets) and experiential marketing that mediate the impact of these independent variables on children as the actors of tomorrow’s hypermarket experience.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual in nature. Future research should empirically validate the conceptual model developed in the paper for children 7–11 years of age.

Practical implications

The conceptual discussion shows that hypermarket managers can use technology such as games and tablets not only to reduce the conflicts between parents and children in hypermarkets but also positively impact on the average time spent in the store. Further, the discussion shows that hypermarket managers can offer children the experience they expect with the use of specific experiential stimuli adapted to children in “children’s aisles” such as toys, children’s clothing, children’s hi-tech and children’s books. They can also theme the experience for children using memorabilia and the engagement of senses. Managerial research should empirically validate this for children 7–11 years of age.

Originality/value

This is the first study that conceptually creates a model of children as the actors of tomorrow’s hypermarket experience. This is something that empirically researched will enhance the understanding of young consumers’ behaviour in the retail process in this advanced age of retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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