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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Aurélien Rouquet, Kiane Goudarzi and Tatiana Henriquez

The starting point of the paper is the fact that customers participate in the logistics activities of the supply chain (SC) (Johnston, 1989; Granzin and Bahn, 1989)…

Abstract

Purpose

The starting point of the paper is the fact that customers participate in the logistics activities of the supply chain (SC) (Johnston, 1989; Granzin and Bahn, 1989). Having established that customers can and do participate in logistics, firms can consider transferring some of their logistics activities to/from their customer. The transfer can take two contrasting forms: outsourcing by the company of some logistics activities to its customers or insourcing by the company of some logistics activities from its customers. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a theoretical understanding of these company/customer transfers.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this emerging issue, the authors build on the service management literature and on the study of two contrasting cases of transfer. The first (IKEA) examines the outsourcing of some logistics activities to the consumer. The second (AuchanDrive) examines the reverse process of insourcing.

Findings

Based on the service management literature and the two case studies, the authors develop a theoretical model for the transfer of logistics activities between a firm and its customers. The findings confirm several elements, such as the importance of managing customer participation and adapting service production during a transfer. Most importantly, the findings show that a key issue for a firm during a transfer is the need to redesign its SC in terms of transport, warehousing and production. The main contribution of the research therefore is showing that customer participation in logistics is a key variable in SC design.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on the analysis of two cases. To generalise these results, further research needs to be conducted.

Practical implications

This research proposes recommendations to help managers and organisations to transfer some logistics activities to or from their customers.

Originality/value

The originality of the framework is that it considers both the company and its customers. This comprehensive approach establishes a link between supply chain management research and marketing.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Sylvie Llosa, Kiane Goudarzi and Chiara Orsingher

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Kiane Goudarzi, Sylvie Llosa and Chiara Orsingher

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Bård Tronvoll, Stephen W. Brown, Dwayne D. Gremler and Bo Edvardsson

Recent discussions of the service‐dominant logic (S‐D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent discussions of the service‐dominant logic (S‐D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that provides directions for ongoing service research. This article aims to examine different epistemological foundations and proposes a framework to describe and better understand the development and future of service research.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the proposed framework, an assessment of 60 selected award‐winning and most cited articles is categorized using the paradigmatic framework.

Findings

Four paradigms are found to be prominent in service research: positivistic, hermeneutic, dialogic, and monologic. The positivistic option has been the dominant paradigm employed by service scholars, suggesting service scholars need to apply the three alternative paradigms more as a means to enrich and extend the service research discipline.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to discuss the fundamental beliefs and worldviews (ontological and epistemological positions) guiding service research. Paradigms are critical determinants and drivers of good research.

Originality/value

A new framework for analyzing paradigmatic foundations in service research and directions for the future design of service research studies is proposed. The suggested framework could inspire scholars to reflect on their ontological and epistemological foundations and provide paradigmatic guidance within service research. This provides a basis for continuous expansion of the service research field.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Howard W. Lightfoot and Heiko Gebauer

Literature is relatively sparse on describing how companies should align their determinants for service innovations with their different types of service strategies. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature is relatively sparse on describing how companies should align their determinants for service innovations with their different types of service strategies. This study seeks to explore the alignment between three types of service strategies and determinants for service innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, multi‐case research design on 12 Western European capital goods manufacturers including 24 service innovation projects was employed. The study is based on multiple sources of evidence: internal documentation of service innovation and development projects and, most importantly, interview data and participation in internal innovation workshops. Traditional inductive research methods were used to analyze the case studies.

Findings

These indicate that aligning service strategies with determinants for service innovations is very complex. The configurations of the determinants are associated with the innovation success. Alternative configurations of determinants can create counterproductive effects and can limit the success of service innovation projects as well as implementation of service strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on interviews and case studies, but the external validity (generalizability) of the alignments could not be assessed accurately. Future research would benefit from insights obtained from quantitative data. The findings supplement existing research on success factors for the service business in manufacturing companies.

Practical implications

The findings imply that managers contemplating a specific service strategy have to consider the service innovation and reframe the determinant for service innovations accordingly. Companies trying to implement an after‐sales service strategy should focus on a narrow range of determinants for service innovations. The resulting configurations guide managers to set up an efficient and effective service innovation management that helps them to implement their service strategy through successful service innovation project.

Originality/value

This empirical study shows that the configuration of determinants for service innovation differs for each service strategy. Whereas, the few similarities in determinants on service innovation are mainly other applications of existing theories on service innovation, the differences modify the existing theories.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Matthias H.J. Gouthier and Miriam Rhein

Organizational pride of service employees presents a vital, but mostly unexplored, factor for business success. In detail, two kinds of organizational pride exist. First…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational pride of service employees presents a vital, but mostly unexplored, factor for business success. In detail, two kinds of organizational pride exist. First, service employees can experience short, persistent affective emotions of pride based on the perception of a successful event related to the organization. Second, employees can have a cognitive and durable attitude of pride resulting from the general perception of the organization. Prior research neglects not only to analyze empirically the relationship between emotional organizational pride and attitudinal organizational pride, but also to examine positive effects from them. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship and the effects of the two kinds of organizational pride with commitment to customer service, creativity and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The first study is an exploratory pre‐study and deals with spontaneous impressions of 53 customer consultants regarding their emotional and attitudinal organizational pride. Data used for the main study were collected through an online panel provider. A sample of 733 service employees was generated and structural equation modeling was applied to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results from the main study suggest that there is a strong relationship between emotional organizational pride and attitudinal organizational pride. Whereas the former has a direct, positive effect on commitment to customer service and creativity, the latter directly influences commitment to customer service and turnover intention. An indirect effect on creativity was also found.

Research limitations/implications

To reduce the complexity of the model, no moderating variables were integrated. In a subsequent step, it is important to analyze empirically the drivers and conduct a longitudinal analysis to test the relationship between the two kinds of organizational pride and their effects over time.

Practical implications

The measurement and management of organizational pride are vital sources for improving service behaviors; they represent new challenges for service‐oriented human resource management.

Originality/value

The paper is novel for three reasons. First, the affective events theory (AET) is advanced by additional substantial relationships. Second, links between the two kinds of organizational pride are analyzed for the first time. Finally, the paper suggests empirical evidence for the positive effects of the two kinds of organizational pride.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Jiun‐Sheng Chris Lin and Chia‐Chuan Hsieh

The success of many high‐contact services depends on customers' compliance with providers' instructions. While existing service marketing literature urges increased…

Abstract

Purpose

The success of many high‐contact services depends on customers' compliance with providers' instructions. While existing service marketing literature urges increased attention to customer compliance, there is, to date, little research investigating its role of compliance in service settings. Based on social cognitive theory, this study aims to fill this important research gap, developing and testing a model to explore the antecedents and consequences of customer compliance in high‐contact service settings. Service friendship is included as a mediator between the antecedents and compliance. Two control variables, relationship duration and contact frequency, were also included in the model.

Design/methodology/approach

A research framework is proposed to suggest the antecedents and consequences of both service friendship and customer compliance. Extant research from various research streams is reviewed, deriving 11 hypotheses. Data collected from customers of high‐contact service industries are examined through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show that the service provider's social skills, customer orientation, and expertise are positively related to service friendship and customer compliance, which in turn affect customer satisfaction and anticipated future interaction. The control variables are also both positively associated with service friendship and anticipated future interaction.

Research limitations/implications

This research represents an early attempt at explaining what affects customer compliance in high‐contact service settings. Future research directions are discussed, with emphasis on incorporating customer characteristics, service interaction characteristics, and employee viewpoints to better understand service friendship and compliance in different service settings.

Practical implications

Customer compliance is a vital component of high‐contact service interactions between employees and customers. Service managers should encourage the formation of customer compliance in conjunction with service friendship to achieve better service outcomes.

Originality/value

This study represents the first study in the service marketing literature to establish a model that explains the mechanism of customer compliance in general service settings. The addition of two control variables representing relationship quantity also enhances the originality and contribution of this study.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Intekhab (Ian) Alam

Few research studies have been conducted to investigate the issue of new service development (NSD) across nations and geographical regions. To address this critique of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Few research studies have been conducted to investigate the issue of new service development (NSD) across nations and geographical regions. To address this critique of the literature, the purpose of this paper is to conduct a comparative study of NSD process and strategy in a developed country, Australia and a developing country, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducted surveys of 102 Australian firms and 97 Indian firms operating in the business‐to‐business financial services industry.

Findings

The findings suggest that significant differences exist between the Australian and Indian firms. Service firms in both countries use different strategies to compete in the industry and emphasize different sets of development stages in developing new services.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis has been restricted to two countries: India and Australia. This suggests the need for further comparative studies of NSD in other cultures/countries.

Practical implications

The findings of this research validate the initial contention that NSD varies from country to country and thus there cannot be a “one‐size‐fits‐all” approach to NSD. The insights from this study can help service managers from India, Australia and other countries to better understand and manage their NSD programs in a cross‐national context.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this research represents the first attempt to empirically test the similarities and differences in NSD practices of Australian and Indian firms.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Thomas Eichentopf, Michael Kleinaltenkamp and Janine van Stiphout

Customers' role in value creation has changed dramatically over the past few years. Today, many firms view customers as co‐creators of value. Until recently, however…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers' role in value creation has changed dramatically over the past few years. Today, many firms view customers as co‐creators of value. Until recently, however, attention to customer integration was mainly directed toward customers' role in a firm's given supply processes. The goal of this paper is to show that processes on the customer side are equally important for the overall success of value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The reasoning for the role of customers is based on a theoretical discussion of customer integration, blueprints and customer scripts. Relating this work to the general problem of transaction costs from information asymmetries, the paper develops a typology of how customer scripts can be applied in various situations.

Findings

It is found that customer scripts can have a positive effect on interactive value creation because they enable companies to build a holistic process image for all process participants.

Research limitations/implications

Marketing must rethink its role as an agent of companies. Indeed, in interactive value creation, boundaries blur. However, the results lack broad empirical confirmation.

Practical implications

It is argued that firms must adopt a customer perspective and provide an approach of how to achieve this.

Originality/value

The paper reintroduces scripts in the marketing discussion. In addition, it provides a new typology of situations in interactive value creation.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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