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Abstract

Details

Strategic Management in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-166-5

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Case study
Publication date: 8 October 2014

Khairul Akmaliah Adham and Shamshubaridah Ramlee

Topics covered by the case include: strategic management processes; and strategies, especially of a platform business.

Abstract

Subject area

Topics covered by the case include: strategic management processes; and strategies, especially of a platform business.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for use in final-year undergraduate business/management degree programs and MBA or MSc in Management programs. The case can be utilized in courses such as strategic management and management of innovation. For MBA and MSc in management programs, the case can also be utilized in organization theory and design and organizational management, or any courses that cover topics of strategic management and management of innovation.

Case overview

By December 2010, the e-Pay terminal system was one of the most successful payment platforms in Malaysia. This business, which was launched in 1999, was an electronic prepaid mobile phone reload value distribution system known as e-Pay; it contributed about 80 per cent of the company's annual revenue. Over the past 10 years, e-Pay's terminal system had evolved into a comprehensive payment platform serving many providers on one side and end customers on the other side. However, since the past two years, the company has been facing pressures from their biggest customers on the provider side of its platform, the three giant telecommunication companies (telcos), which had moved to directly deliver reload values to their prepaid subscribers, bypassing e-Pay as the payment intermediary. On the customer side, the number of prepaid subscribers switching to postpaid services was increasing, and this threatened e-Pay's main source of revenue in the prepaid market. In response to this, the company added new service providers to its platform and launched multi-functional cashier machines with reload credits facility. By December 2010, as the market sunk into subscription saturation, the two founders of the company became deeply concerned about the company's future. They wondered if the problems would hinder their company from becoming a dominant payment player in Asia. This case presents an opportunity to discuss strategic posturing of a payment platform company operating in a mobile phone market which was mainly controlled by the telecommunication companies.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding of strategic management process and related analysis enable case analysts to apply these concepts in many business situations involving strategy formulation and implementation.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email: support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 10 October 2013

Khairul Akmaliah Adham, Rosmah Mat Isa, Zizah Che Senik and Norjaya M. Yasin

Developing and communicating a positioning strategy covering issues on market positioning, product lifecycle, product differentiation strategies and developing the…

Abstract

Subject area

Developing and communicating a positioning strategy covering issues on market positioning, product lifecycle, product differentiation strategies and developing the marketing mix strategies in order to compete with competitors.

Study level/applicability

Advanced undergraduate and MBA student, taking courses of marketing management, strategic marketing, and brand management.

Case overview

GranuLab is a private limited company based in Shah Alam, about 30 km from Malaysia's capital city of Kuala Lumpur; it was a producer of synthetic bone graft substitute GranuMaS. GranuMaS was launched in the Malaysian market in late 2010. At that time, the company aimed to capture 50-70 percent of the Malaysian bone graft substitute market by the end of 2015. However, by the end of 2012, GranuLab was experiencing low sales and the company had suffered a two-year loss due to manufacturing at low capacity. GranuLab also faced stiff competition from multinational competitors that had penetrated the Malaysian market earlier with competitive product offerings. The pressure to increase the sale ofGranuMaS was mounting for Mr Romli Ishak, the Managing Director of GranuLab, Mr Fadil Dalal, the new General Manager of Marketing, and GranuLab's management team. This is especially so since the company's contract to supply GranuMaS to government hospitals under the Ministry of Health (MOH) program would end soon. These situations forced the company to make a quick decision. In December 2012, Mr Romli and his team pondered upon the best strategy that the company should pursue to achieve its objective of being a dominant player in the Malaysian bone graft substitute industry. This teaching case is designed to stimulate case analysts' thinking on positioning a medical device product in a market which was already conquered by established multinational companies.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding of the concept of product positioning, product lifecycle, marketing mix strategies, and social exchange theory, enables case analysts to extend the concepts to analyzing many other products and services in organizational settings.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 10 October 2013

Zizah Che Senik, Rosmah Mat Isa, Noreha Halid, Adlin Masood, Soo-Wah Low and Khairul Akmaliah Adham

The area of focus is on organization strategies, specifically in developing appropriate strategies for business expansion in a situation of high economic uncertainties.

Abstract

Subject area

The area of focus is on organization strategies, specifically in developing appropriate strategies for business expansion in a situation of high economic uncertainties.

Study level/applicability

This case is designed for advanced undergraduate in the business and management programs and students in the MBA programs. It is suitable for courses of organizational management, organization theory and design, strategic management, and managerial economics.

Case overview

At the end of 2009, Kumpulan Perubatan Johor Healthcare Group was the largest public-listed healthcare service provider in Malaysia, with revenues of RM1.5 billion (approximately USD0.5 billion) and a net profit after tax of RM115 million (approximately USD38 million). The country was experiencing economic downturn, which affected demands of the affluent as well as medical tourism segments, which were the targeted market of the company. Datin Paduka Siti Sa'diah Sheikh Bakir, the group's CEO and her management team realized that the company needed to seek a new growth strategy. The case stimulates a discussion on the future strategy of a high-growth healthcare company that aspired to be the leading healthcare player in the region.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding the process of analyzing an industry, as well as formulating strategies, enables case analysts to extend the practice of making strategic decisions to many business situations.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 16 August 2016

Saida Farhanah Sarkam, Siti Khadijah Mohd Ghanie, Nur Sa’adah Muhamad and Khairul Akmaliah Adham

“Starting up a new company” and “development of technology-based venture”.

Abstract

Subject area

“Starting up a new company” and “development of technology-based venture”.

Study level/applicability

The target audiences for this study are advanced business or non-business undergraduate students and MBA students taking courses of entrepreneurship, management of innovation and organization theory and design.

Case overview

Yeayyy.com was a private limited company based in Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, a township located about 30 km south of Kuala Lumpur. It was founded by Mr Hazmin in early 2010 with a seed funding of RM150,000 (about US$50,000). By the end of 2014, its core businesses include developing mobile application (app), software and website, as well as conducting information technology (IT) training. The company had developed its own animation cartoon, Oolat Oolit, and had commercialized several mobile app inventions. These mobile apps include a Jawi (traditional Malay writing system) app, mobile games and Facebook apps which were compatible with most mobile operating systems. Since its inception, Yeayyy.com had aspired to follow the footsteps of the internationally acclaimed Malaysian home-grown animation production house, Les’ Copaque, which had produced the popular Upin Ipin series. Similar to Les’ Copaque, Yeayyy.com also planned to commercialize its in-house characters into TV series and to market related merchandises, along with its collaborative partner, CikuTree Studio. However, by the end of 2014, the company’s seed funding had depleted, thus forcing Mr Hazmin to strategize for the company’s future.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding the process of entrepreneurship and technology-based venture development enables case analysts to apply the concepts in many situations involving business opportunities and company development.

Subject code

CSS:3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Khairul Akmaliah Adham, Mohd Fuaad Said, Nur Sa'adah Muhamad, Saida Farhanah Sarkam, Zizah Che Senik and Rosmah Mat Isa

The area of focus is on internationalization strategies, specifically on developing suitable strategies to support an internationalization initiative of a new medical…

Abstract

Subject area

The area of focus is on internationalization strategies, specifically on developing suitable strategies to support an internationalization initiative of a new medical device company.

Study level/applicability

This case is designed for final year undergraduate and MBA students. It is suitable for courses of organizational management, organization theory and design, strategic management, and international business as well as international marketing.

Case overview

GranuLab, a medical device company that produced the synthetic bone graft substitute GranuMaS, aspired to be a high-growth company. To achieve this aspiration the company had made plans for internationalization, which include penetrating the ASEAN, Middle East, Latin American, and African markets within the next five years. By December 2010, GranuLab had completed the construction of its new manufacturing facility in Shah Alam, about 30km from Malaysia's capital city of Kuala Lumpur. This manufacturing facility had the capability to produce high volumes to support the company's high growth plan. However, the company's internationalization processes had taken longer than expected and this has led to a low business volume. By mid-2012, the company was forced to make a quick decision as it had suffered a year and a half of operations losses. GranuLab had to formulate a strategy as to how to position GranuMaS and penetrate the targeted markets. Failure to internationalize would incur even greater losses and might hinder the achievement of its high growth aspiration by 2015.

Expected learning outcomes

This case is designed to stimulate case analysts' thinking into providing recommendations for the appropriate internationalization strategies to be adopted by the management team to ensure that the company could succeed in achieving its goals. The case will expose students to the concepts and theories of strategic management, international business, international entrepreneurship; and facilitate the development of students' abilities to apply those concepts in managerial situations.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Mohd Fuaad Said, Khairul Akmaliah Adham, Nur Sa’adah Muhamad and Syahnaz Sulaiman

This study focusses on the underlying needs of Muslims to adhere to the tenets of their religion and to guide their behaviours accordingly. These requirements, for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focusses on the underlying needs of Muslims to adhere to the tenets of their religion and to guide their behaviours accordingly. These requirements, for the purpose of travelling, constitute halal tourism. As Muslim-minority nations, such as Taiwan, South Korea and Japan, began to market their own brands of halal tourism, there are concerns of whether their current practices are able to meet the requirements of Muslim travellers. Thus, this study aims to understand the main needs and concerns of Muslim travellers when they visit Muslim-minority countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted on selected Muslim travellers who recently visited one of the following destinations, Japan, South Korea or Taiwan. Applying the process theory of travel, service marketing perspective and Muslim religious needs, the study’s conceptual framework served as the basis for crafting interview questions, selecting the participants and explaining the findings.

Findings

Muslim travellers are mostly concerned with the need to perform daily prayers and to find halal food at the point of need, and willing to conduct extensive research on the destination prior to their visit. Muslim travellers’ experiences in these Muslim-minority countries are generally met with their expectations, although further socialisation with the locals is needed to induce greater overall satisfaction with the destinations.

Practical implications

Understanding the current practices of halal tourism is critical so that improvements can be implemented in the industry.

Originality/value

Key preparations, expectations, actual experiences in the destinations and reflections of Muslim travellers provide in-depth insights into their needs and concerns when travelling in Muslim-minority countries. The emergent religion-based dimensions in service experience, such as availability of social agents and halal food at the point of need, extend the conceptualisation of perishability and heterogeneity in service marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 10 October 2013

Khairul Akmaliah Adham, Rosmah Mat Isa, Noreha Halid, Norrana Khidil, Adlin Masood and Zizah Che Senik

Strategic Management and Organization Theory and Design.

Abstract

Subject area

Strategic Management and Organization Theory and Design.

Study level/applicability

Advanced undergraduate and MBA students taking courses in Strategic Management and Organization Theory and Design.

Case overview

By the end of 2011, five years short of its centennial anniversary, UMW Holdings was one of the biggest corporations in Malaysia, registering revenues of RM13.5 billion (US$4.5 billion), and net profit after tax of RMI billion (US$0.33 billion). By that time, it had 110 subsidiaries, operating in four core businesses of automotive assembly and distribution of Toyota lines of products, automotive components and lubricants original equipment manufacturing (OEM) and replacement equipment manufacturing (REM), heavy equipment, and oil and gas drilling service. In September 2011, the company had targeted its Toyota automotive business to contribute to 50 percent of its revenues, while the other 50 percent would come from its other three businesses, by the year 2015. However, as of the first quarter of 2012, Datuk Syed Hisham Syed Wazir, the Group CEO and his management team realized that, at 72 percent, the automotive business was still the main contributor to the Group's revenues. As the company's Toyota assembly operation was limited exclusively to the Malaysian market, plus in the face of greater competition within the automotive industries, the company needed to set strategies to achieve its 50:50 plan. The case stimulates discussion on strategy formulation of a mature corporation, involved in diversified business portfolio.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding the process of industry analysis, as well as the formulation and implementation of business-level and corporate strategies, enables case analysts to extend the concepts to many business situations.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 11 October 2013

Zizah Che Senik, Khairul Akmaliah Adham, Rosmah Mat Isa, Noreha Halid and Adlin Masood

International business, international marketing, and strategic management.

Abstract

Subject area

International business, international marketing, and strategic management.

Study level/applicability

Advanced undergraduate and MBA students taking courses in international business, international marketing, and strategic management.

Case overview

KPJ Healthcare Group started its operations in 1979. By the end of 2012, the Group operated 22 hospitals in Malaysia, two in Indonesia, one in Thailand, and one retirement resort in Australia. Its internationalization efforts began in mid-1990s with the provision of hospital management service in Indonesia, Bangladesh, and Saudi Arabia. Since 2010, the Group had pursued international acquisition projects in Australia, Indonesia and Thailand. In early 2013, the Group's newly appointed CEO and his management team had to decide on the strategies to ensure the success of these international acquisition projects. This case stimulates discussion on international strategies of a large healthcare group, operating in a highly competitive, high-growth industry in an emerging economy.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding of approaches to service internationalization (incremental versus rapid), strategies in service internationalization, forms of service internationalization ventures will enable case analysts to apply and consider these concepts in many business situations involving internationalization process and business growth in general.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Khairul Akmaliah Adham and Maisarah Ahmad

This study examines the adoption rates of web site and e‐commerce technology by all 562 Malaysian public listed companies, as of March 2004, testing the proposition that…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the adoption rates of web site and e‐commerce technology by all 562 Malaysian public listed companies, as of March 2004, testing the proposition that the number having web sites would approach 100 percent, and that most companies serving end customers would also have e‐commerce systems.

Design/methodology/approach

After identifying and testing company URLs for operability, contents of all operable sites were evaluated to determine whether they had incorporated e‐commerce systems for online transactions.

Findings

Of the 562 companies, only 62 percent (351) were found to have operable web sites; and of 351, 96 percent (336) were solely informational, leaving only 4 percent (15) that were equipped for e‐commerce transactions.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed on reasons and consequences for not adopting web site and e‐commerce technology, and on specific business contexts surrounding adoption decisions and related managerial challenges.

Practical implications

Analysis of findings and research literature strongly suggest that having a web site would give any public listed company a major advantage in the marketplace. The most effective web site implementation appears to require aligning new technology with company's strategic planning, integrating it into existing operations, using it to exploit new business opportunities and considering customer behavior theory when designing and implementing the web site interface.

Originality/value

As the first study to examine adoption of web site and e‐commerce technology by all currently existing Malaysian public listed companies, this provides a benchmark for further research on the subject.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 105 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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