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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bob Lingard, Debra Hayes and Martin Mills

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves…

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Abstract

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves across Australia since the Karmel Report. This paper specifically focuses in on developments in Queensland. The Queensland analysis traces the moves from Labor’s Focus on Schools through the Coalition’s Leading Schools and the most recent Labor rearticulation in the document Future Directions for School‐based Management in Queensland State Schools. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of school‐based management has no stipulative meaning, but rather is a contested concept. More generally, the paper provides an account and analysis of new forms of governance in educational systems and the tension between centralising and decentralising tendencies as school‐based management is adopted in order to address a number of competing policy objectives.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Daryl Martyris

Every year thousands of computers deemed obsolete by companies upgrading to newer models are kept out of landfills by organizations like World Computer Exchange (WCE)1…

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218

Abstract

Every year thousands of computers deemed obsolete by companies upgrading to newer models are kept out of landfills by organizations like World Computer Exchange (WCE)1 which recycle them to schools in developing countries. It is possible to set up at a very low cost, clusters of recycled PCs, using Linux software to substantially reduce the cost of establishing school‐based community Internet centers. In the case of such an implementation in Goa, India by a WCE partner‐NGO the key to its success has been collaboration between the NGO and the private sector to encourage the growth of local Linux support skills and with the government sector ‐ the Goa State Education Department ‐ to ensure the acceptance of Linux in the curriculum, and the provision of teacher training. The Goa Schools Computers project (GSCP)2 project provides an example of how low initial costs of infrastructure and linkages between different stakeholders can result in cost savings of up to 60% over a conventional community Internet center thereby increasing their chances for financial viability.

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Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Gary Robinson, Bernard Leckning, Richard Midford, Helen Harper, Sven Silburn, Jess Gannaway, Kylie Dolan, Tim Delphine and Craig Hayes

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of development and the pilot implementation of a preventive life skills curriculum for Indigenous middle school…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of development and the pilot implementation of a preventive life skills curriculum for Indigenous middle school students in a very remote community college in the West Arnhem region of North Australia. The curriculum integrates proven educational and psychological techniques with culturally informed notions of relatedness and was developed as a contribution to efforts to prevent alarming rates of suicide among remote Indigenous youth. In this paper, the term, Indigenous refers to Australians of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on reviews of research literature on school-based suicide prevention and social and emotional learning in both general and Indigenous populations, and following detailed community consultations, a 12 week curriculum was drafted and implemented in two middle school classes (combined years 7-9). Lessons were videotaped and later analyzed and detailed commentary was sought from participating school staff.

Findings

The pilot program has yielded important insights into requirements of a curriculum for young people with low English literacy levels and with variable school attendance patterns. It confirmed the need to adjust both pedagogical approach and curriculum content for the program to have resonance with students from this linguistic and cultural background and with varying levels of exposure to multiple stressors in disadvantaged community settings.

Practical implications

The project has identified and resolved key questions for sustainable implementation of a preventive curriculum in challenging community circumstances.

Originality/value

There are to date no examples of the systematic adaptation and design of a universal preventive intervention specifically for remote Australian Indigenous youth. The project is the first step toward the formal evaluation of the efficacy of a classroom-based approach to suicide prevention in remote community schools.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Nancy Bouranta, Evangelos Psomas and Jiju Antony

The aim of this paper is to present the main findings of the studies in the field of quality management (QM) in primary and secondary education. Grouping these findings…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the main findings of the studies in the field of quality management (QM) in primary and secondary education. Grouping these findings into themes and these themes, in turn, into broad categories as well as prioritizing the themes of findings are also aims of the present study.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) of articles focusing on QM in primary and secondary education was carried out based on major publishers, namely Emerald Online, Taylor and Francis, Elsevier/Science Direct, Springer Link, Sage Publishing and Online. In total, 133 articles published in 62 journals during 1983–2019 were collected. The affinity diagram was applied in order to group the findings of the QM studies into logical themes and these themes into broad categories. Moreover, the Pareto diagram was applied to prioritize the themes revealed.

Findings

A plethora of articles focusing on QM in primary and secondary education have been published in the last decades. The findings of the QM studies presented in the 133 reviewed articles are grouped into 43 themes and these themes, in turn, into 6 broad categories, namely management practices, school characteristics, teachers, stakeholders, government and pupils. The analysis also reveals themes that can be characterized as “vital” and “useful.”

Practical implications

Researchers and school managers can take into consideration the findings of the QM studies in primary and secondary education as well as the themes of high priority for the design of future studies and QM implementation plans, respectively.

Originality/value

This is the first literature review study which presents analytically the findings of the QM studies in primary and secondary education. This study also contributes to the literature by formulating meaningful themes of these findings and broad categories of these themes and by prioritizing the themes revealed.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Manuel Salas-Velasco

The purpose of this paper is to measure the efficiency performance of public sector-funded schools in Spain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the efficiency performance of public sector-funded schools in Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

Using school-level data from Program for International Student Assessment 2012, cross-sectional models were estimated using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Technical efficiencies of public sector-funded schools (public schools and centros concertados), and their determinants were estimated using a one-step maximum likelihood procedure. SFA models include both a stochastic error term and a term that can be characterized as inefficiency; the non-negative technical inefficiency effects are assumed to be a function of school characteristics.

Findings

The results show that greater school autonomy and school responsibility for resource allocation are associated with efficiency improvement. Subsidized private schools (called centros concertados) were more efficient than public schools. The former are free of bureaucratic constraints that encumber public schools, and they are able to control many more decisions at the school level (e.g. they select their own teachers).

Originality/value

This paper shows the value of school autonomy for educational performance. The author defines school autonomy as the operational empowerment of the principals and teachers. Therefore, the government could grant greater autonomy to public schools (school-based management), since school autonomy is a driver of efficiency. Further, teachers’ morale is also an environmental driver of efficiency. Schools tend to be more efficient when teachers work with enthusiasm or value academic achievement. And this is more likely to occur in private schools, even though teachers are hired (they are not civil servants) and have a lower salary than public school teachers. The lack of motivation of many teachers in public schools may be in the absence of incentives – there is no possibility of promotion and everyone is guaranteed a wage increase every three years –and in the bureaucratization of the public school system.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Ruth Tennant, Cristina Goens, Jane Barlow, Crispin Day and Sarah Stewart‐Brown

There is a growing policy imperative to promote positive mental health as well as prevent the development of mental health problems in children. This paper summarises the…

Abstract

There is a growing policy imperative to promote positive mental health as well as prevent the development of mental health problems in children. This paper summarises the findings of published systematic reviews evaluating such interventions. A search was undertaken of ten electronic databases using a combination of medical subject headings (MeSH) and free text searches. Systematic reviews covering mental health promotion or mental illness prevention interventions aimed at infants, children or young people up to age 19 were included. Reviews of drug and alcohol prevention programmes and programmes to prevent childhood abuse and neglect were excluded because these have been the subject of recent good quality reviews of reviews. A total of 27 systematic reviews were included. These targeted a range of risk and protective factors, and a range of populations (including parents and children). While many lacked methodological rigour, overall the evidence is strongly suggestive of the effectiveness of a range of interventions in promoting positive mental well‐being, and reducing key risk factors for mental illness in children. Based on this evidence, arguments are advanced for the preferential provision of early preventive programmes.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Kai-wing Chu

This paper aims to explore the influence of a principal’s leadership in kicking off knowledge management (KM) implementation and the following KM processes in the school…

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1239

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of a principal’s leadership in kicking off knowledge management (KM) implementation and the following KM processes in the school. The author tries to propose a model of knowledge leadership for principals to adopt at the beginning of KM journey and during the process of KM implementation. The paper shares the lessons learned during the process of implementation: what he has done and what should be improved. Thus, this paper can provide a model for school principals to implement KM in their schools. This paper also sheds light for KM researchers about the issue of leadership during KM implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an action research (AR) to explore how the principal’s leadership can enhance KM implementation in a school environment and evaluates the effectiveness of the knowledge leadership framework for KM implementation in a school setting. An insider AR methodology was adopted to study and reflect on the processes of KM implementation and lessons learned. Multiple data sources, including observations, questionnaires and interviews, have been collected for evaluation.

Findings

In this study, the principal kicked off KM in the school. It was found that KM “cannot” be implemented without the principal’s effective knowledge leadership. If there was only little KM leadership, such as the leadership in Stage 1, the launching of KM was found to be difficult. After awareness of the need of strengthening leadership in Stage 2, the principal exercised stronger leadership in pushing the KM process further, and the school had more obvious KM outcomes. Therefore, this study proves that leadership is essential for KM implementation, especially at the beginning of the KM processes. The principal acted as the knowledge leader with the roles of the knowledge vision builder, knowledge enabler builder and knowledge role model. The roles of knowledge leadership are found to be potent and critical for the process of KM implementation to facilitate sharing information/knowledge and nurturing a sharing culture and trust. In this study, the principal kicked off KM in the school. It was found that KM “cannot” be implemented without the principal’s effective knowledge leadership. If there was only little KM leadership, such as the leadership in Stage 1, launching KM was found to be difficult. After awareness of the need of strengthening leadership in Stage 2, the principal exercised stronger leadership in pushing the KM process further, and the school had more obvious KM outcomes. Therefore, this study proves that leadership is essential for KM implementation, especially at the beginning of the KM processes. The principal acted as the knowledge leader with the roles of knowledge vision builder, knowledge enabler builder and knowledge role model. The roles of knowledge leadership are found to be potent and critical for the process of KM implementation to facilitate sharing information/knowledge and nurturing a sharing culture and trust.

Research limitations/implications

Although the results of the study conducted in one school may not be generalized to other school contexts, the lessons learned in the study might be a reference to other schools for their future development. Because of his unique position as the principal in the researched school, the researcher adopted an insider approach generating value for investigation of KM implementation in this study, as there were multiple mediating processes through which leaders could influence school functioning, and, hence, knowledge sharing or other issues in KM implementation.

Practical implications

This study could contribute toward KM implementation in the public sector, especially in schools. Moreover, the approaches, the strategies, the processes and the challenges the principal and the school faced can shed light on practice and research for further KM implementation. In addition, although leadership has been commonly regarded as an important factor in KM implementation, few studies have explored the impact of leadership during the KM process. With the principal’s leadership as the main component, this study is important for an analysis of the role of leadership during the process. The framework of knowledge leadership adopted in this study has been tried and evaluated to be applicable and necessary for KM implementation in a school environment.

Social implications

Most people might think that KM can be applied only in the commercial sector. This study shows that KM can also be adopted in schools and in other sectors. Moreover, it shows that the principal’s leadership was the key driver for KM implementation. The principal’s leadership with clear direction and thoughtful procedures of implementing may be a showcase for the leaders in other sectors.

Originality/value

Fullan (2002) mentions the essence of KM in schools, the importance of principals’ leadership in the promotion of KM in schools, the moral purpose and knowledge sharing and leadership and sustainability, but he does not provide any practical suggestion for how principals can become knowledge leaders. Therefore, this paper hopes to further propose a model to show how to help a principal transform into a knowledge leader to overcome barriers and difficulties in kicking off KM at the beginning of their KM journey and during the process of KM implementation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Amit Sinha, William P. Millhiser and Yuanjie He

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges…

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3072

Abstract

Purpose

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges not only to higher education institutions, but also to students, employing organizations, and third parties like SCM-related professional bodies. To understand the challenge, the purpose of this paper is to examine the gap between demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, answer-related design questions, and make recommendations to close the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

To compare the demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, demand data is collected from a professional career website and supply data is gathered from operations management (OM) and SCM course syllabi from AACSB-accredited business schools in the USA. Cluster analysis identifies how supply and demand are matched on the data collected.

Findings

First, gaps exist between SCM talent requirements from industry and the knowledge/skill training by US business schools. This paper identifies matching, under-supplying, and over-supplying knowledge areas. Under-supply in emerging areas such as SCM information technology and certain logistics management topics are found. Some traditional OM topics are over-supplied due to out-of-date industry applications and should be revised to reflect the field’s transition from an OM to SCM view. Last, this paper makes recommendations to different stakeholders in this matching supply with demand process.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in two ways. First, it provides an up-to-date understanding on demand and supply of SCM talent in USA. Second, it provides insights and recommendations not only to educators on curriculum design, but also to potential candidates interested in SCM careers, to companies’ job recruiters, and to professional organizations (such as APICS and Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals) to reduce the gaps between demand and supply.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2019

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

George Beck and Sharon L. Segrest‐Purkiss

The LAUSD is the largest school district in the State and is charged with the responsibility of educating over one‐fifth of the children in California. Taken individually…

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405

Abstract

The LAUSD is the largest school district in the State and is charged with the responsibility of educating over one‐fifth of the children in California. Taken individually, each of the LAUSD’s eleven local districts would rank in the top twenty in the State in terms of student population. The District is LA County’s second largest employer, and with an annual operating and capital budget of over nine billion dollars, it brings together a diverse range of active and dynamic stakeholders. In 2000 the LAUSD found itself at a crossroads. In response to growing criticism and the threat of a State‐mandated break‐up due to the poor performance of their schools, the District created eleven mini‐districts to improve accountability and take instructional programs closer to the people who use them. This paper provides background on the LAUSD’s decentralization effort and power sharing aspects of the District’s self‐imposed break‐up, and recommendations for addressing these issues are postulated.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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1 – 10 of 150