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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Fusheng Xie, Ling Gao and Peiyu Xie

This paper examines the different features of China's economic development in different stages of economic globalization. The study finds that the investment- and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the different features of China's economic development in different stages of economic globalization. The study finds that the investment- and export-based growth model drove China's high-speed economic growth between 2000 and 2007, which came into existence around 2000 when China plugged into the global production network.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper also finds that China slowed down to the New Normal because of the disruption to the socio-economic underpinnings of this growth model. As China adapts to and steers the New Normal, supply-side structural reforms can channel excess capacity to the construction of underground pipe networks in rural areas of central China and fix capital while advance rural revitalization.

Findings

At the same time, enterprises must strive to build a key component development platform for key component innovation and the standard-setting power in global manufacturing.

Originality/value

The establishment of a domestic production network integrating the integrated innovation-driven core enterprises and modular producers at different levels can satisfy the dynamic demand structure of China in which standardized demands and personalized demands coexist.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Christophe Midler

The last few decades have seen the rapid emergence of two transformative streams in large firms. The first is the development of project management, aimed at improving the…

Abstract

Purpose

The last few decades have seen the rapid emergence of two transformative streams in large firms. The first is the development of project management, aimed at improving the performance of innovation management, while the second, the internationalization of innovation organizations and processes in response to strategies of redeployment toward emerging countries. Both streams have been closely analyzed in the fields of project management and international management, respectively. However, the links between the two have been less studied. The purpose of this paper is to consider the hypothesis that a firm’s projectification might have an important impact on its pattern of internationalization in innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

First, we present the models of internationalization of innovation processes used in the multinational corporation literature. This field essentially focuses on the components of permanent organizations: global internationalization strategy and legacy, R&D footprint, characterization of local subsidiaries and the role of central head offices. Projects figure only as a context in which those elements operate, not as a structuring variable of the global innovation process pattern. The authors challenge this view by exploring whether the specificities of the firm’s projectification pattern can influence how it builds its global innovation process. The paper is based on a longitudinal case where the authors analyze the organizational transition within the Renault group, an emblematic case of a multinational that implemented a spectacular internationalization transition in the 2000s.

Findings

Our results demonstrate project organizing’s major impact on the internationalization patterns of innovation processes within the firm. They show how the deployment of a polycentric innovation footprint has been the consequence of a specific projectification transition, giving the project and program functions the autonomy to transgress centralized product development norms to adapt their project to the local environment; use the initial breakthrough project as the foundation for a new and specific global product development network through a lineage logic; and sustain this innovation global network as a permanent process of the firm.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates the importance of the organization’s projectification characteristics as an important vector for successfully implementing the most advanced internationalization strategies (i.e. reverse innovation) and innovation processes models (i.e. integrated networks).

Practical implications

The paper characterizes project management related conditions that can govern the success of innovation strategies in high-growth emerging countries: the autonomy and empowerment of project functions; colocation and integration of teams; existence of a program function; and HR policies capable of supporting lineage management and project-to-project learning processes.

Originality/value

Bridging project management literature with multinational management literature. Demonstrate the key impact of projectification on internationalization pattern of the firm. Longitudinal analysis of a firm internationalization transition on a ten-year period.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Benjamin Jian Chung Yuan, Chun Yi Liu, Kun Ming Kao and Ying Che Hsu

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the development of body fitness equipment in Taiwan from the viewpoint of innovation and the factor of success for innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the development of body fitness equipment in Taiwan from the viewpoint of innovation and the factor of success for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methods include a literature study and a case study. In addition, the innovation activity of an enterprise is based on the viewpoint of procedure (input‐process‐output). The innovation activity of an enterprise is separated into three phases: innovation motivation, innovation process, and innovation performance.

Findings

The enterprise's competitive advantage and efficiency can clearly be seen, and the reason for the enterprise's success can easily be identified through a structural analysis of the innovation process. The research results indicate four factors for the success of Johnson: mastering technology, good management, employment of diversified talents, and clear brand positioning.

Research limitations/implications

The innovation research model provides a comprehensive summary of the innovation process, stressing innovation activity. The study of the factors of success does not establish quantified or non‐quantified innovation indicators.

Practical implications

The factor of success of innovation is not exactly the same for every company. Sorting and analyzing the individual cases can serve as a basis of reference and act as a guidepost for other companies in similar industries during their business development.

Originality/value

The analysis model of innovation activity can clearly explore the development process of the innovation success of an enterprise. Simultaneously, this research can serve as a role model for other companies when they innovate.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Lijun Liu and Zuhua Jiang

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on how technological innovation capabilities (TICs) influence the product competitiveness of Chinese manufacturing enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on how technological innovation capabilities (TICs) influence the product competitiveness of Chinese manufacturing enterprises and identify the key technological innovation components.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research setting was applied in Chinese Yangtze River Delta. Survey was carried out with 166 responses.

Findings

The study reveals that the firm’s strategies capabilities, knowledge resources, fundamental research, application R & D, and manufacturing capabilities have significant influence on the new product development performance and product competitiveness of Chinese manufacturing enterprises. Interestingly, firm’s organizational capabilities and human, finance, and material resource have no significant correlation with the product competitiveness.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, the relationships among TICs enablers, processes, and product competitiveness may provide a clue regarding how firms can promote technological innovation to sustain their competitive advantage. Moreover, the key factors of TICs found in the study are useful for policy makers and managers of Chinese firms to make decision.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies to apply the structure equation model method to measure the relationship between TICs and product competitiveness under the background of Chinese manufacturing. The results provide a new framework on the how technological innovation capability influence product competitiveness of Chinese manufacturing firms. From a managerial perspective, this study identifies several crucial TICs factors to support product competitiveness, and discusses the implications of these factors for developing organizational strategies that encourage technological innovation.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Paul Hyland, Graydon Davison and Terry Sloan

Palliative care is a complex environment in which teams of healthcare professionals are constantly challenged to match the configuration of care delivery to suit the…

Abstract

Palliative care is a complex environment in which teams of healthcare professionals are constantly challenged to match the configuration of care delivery to suit the dynamics of the patient's bio‐medical, social and spiritual situations as they change during the end‐of‐life process. In such an environment these teams need to engage in ongoing interaction between different professional disciplines, incremental improvement in care delivery, learning and radical innovation. This is aimed at combining operational effectiveness, strategic flexibility, exploitation and exploration, in a way that ensures the best possible care for the patient. This paper examines previous research on the management competences and the organisational capabilities necessary for continuous innovation, and analyses evidence emerging from a study of palliative care. Work on the relationships between innovation capacities, organisational capabilities and team‐based competence is drawn together. Evidence is presented from research into the management of innovation in palliative care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Paul Hyland, Graydon Davison and Terry Sloan

Palliative care is a complex environment in which teams of health care professionals are constantly challenged to match the configuration of care delivery to suit the…

Abstract

Palliative care is a complex environment in which teams of health care professionals are constantly challenged to match the configuration of care delivery to suit the dynamics of the whole of a patient’s bio‐medical, social and spiritual situations as they change during the end of life process. In such an environment these teams need to engage in ongoing interaction between different professional disciplines, incremental improvement in care delivery, learning and radical innovation. This is aimed at combining operational effectiveness and strategic flexibility, exploitation and exploration in a way that ensures the best possible end of life experience for the patient. This paper examines previous research on the management competences and the organisational capabilities necessary for continuous innovation, and analyses evidence emerging from a study of palliative care. Work on the relationships between innovation capacities, organisational capabilities and team‐based competence is drawn together. Evidence is presented from research into the management of innovation in palliative care.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2017

John Bessant

Abstract

Details

Riding the Innovation Wave
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-570-2

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Virginia Munro

The Fourth Industrial Revolution has escalated innovation to new heights unseen, creating an evolution of innovation and corporate social responsibility (CSR), and as a…

Abstract

The Fourth Industrial Revolution has escalated innovation to new heights unseen, creating an evolution of innovation and corporate social responsibility (CSR), and as a result, a more Innovative CSR. With this evolution comes also the evolution of the ‘Preneur’ from social entrepreneur to corporate social entrepreneur and corporate social intrapreneur. It is therefore important to acknowledge that social entrepreneurship is not just for the social sector, or start-up entrepreneur – corporations can also be social entrepreneurs. This chapter establishes an understanding of this possibility alongside solving wicked problems and challenges, and how to provide collaborative networks and co-creation experiences to assist others on this journey. More importantly, the chapter discusses how corporates can assist millennials (and Generation Z) by funding and incubating their innovative or social enterprise idea under the umbrella of CSR strategy, until it is ready to be released to the world. The chapter is supported by academic literature and business publications with suggestions for future research opportunities.

Details

CSR for Purpose, Shared Value and Deep Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-035-8

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Santanu Roy and Jay Mitra

The authors investigate the relationship between the structure and the functioning of scientific and technical (S&T) personnel and the quality research and development…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors investigate the relationship between the structure and the functioning of scientific and technical (S&T) personnel and the quality research and development (R&D) performance output of laboratories functioning under the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), India. The purpose of this paper is to examine how rapid economic and social changes and the demand for better accountability are addressed by public R&D institutions in a specific developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the functions performed by the S&T personnel as indicators of their tacit knowledge. The authors use data from 27 different CSIR laboratories to analyze the specific functions carried out by knowledge workers (S&T personnel) in order to gauge the internal strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories in different functional areas. The authors use the following measures to tap the quality R&D performance of these laboratories – number of Indian patents filed and granted, number of foreign patents filed and granted, and the number of published papers figuring among the top 50 CSIR publications in specific research areas over an extended period of 11 years (2003-2004 to 2013-2014).

Findings

The findings show that there is no readymade formula for identifying improvements in quality performance by a research laboratory, given a particular set of S&T worker profile in terms of the six functions defined in the study. The top-performing laboratories have excellent patent as well as publication record reinforcing the point that innovation encompasses both basic and applied research with success depending upon strategically emphasizing the different components of the innovation process.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the present research work is limited by the choice of the quality R&D performance measures adopted in the study that could be further expanded to better tap the social accountability of these public-funded institutions. In addition, inclusion of all CSIR laboratories in the study framework would add value to the study findings. The research highlights the importance of tacit knowledge management and organizational learning as central features of strategic organization development for technology practices incorporating R&D work, the support of pilot plants, experimental field stations, and engineering and design units.

Practical implications

The paper has particular implications for the leadership and management of public R&D organizations and public policy formulation for innovation in an emerging developing economy context.

Originality/value

This study extends the extant literature by drawing upon the role of tacit knowledge and organizational learning to inform the empirical research on managing public R&D and the innovations that result from it, in a particular emerging economy context, that is, India.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Renate Lukjanska

Over the last decade, the competitiveness of enterprise has been dictated by the availability of knowledge and its application into successful innovations. Innovation

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last decade, the competitiveness of enterprise has been dictated by the availability of knowledge and its application into successful innovations. Innovation capacity indicators in Latvia stay low and enterprises are considerably lagging in comparison with other European Union countries, data reflected at “European Innovation Scoreboard 2008”, where Latvia took 30th place among 32 countries. The purpose of this paper is the identification of knowledge innovation (KI) hindering factors at Latvian enterprises. The focus is to develop a KI management framework for Latvian enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The research objective is achieved by analysing available statistical data, national development documents, empirical research and two discussions with participants involved with innovation systems. The author's practical interpretation of specific KIs basic elements is provided. The design of the paper is the following: theoretical aspects of KI, practical description of the current innovation and knowledge management (KM) in Latvian enterprise, the role of education and science in KI field, identification of hindering aspects of KI development, and conclusions and suggestions.

Findings

The main findings show that only a few elements of innovation and KM are functioning at Latvian enterprises. The role of science and education play a key role. Main hindering factors affecting KI are identified. There is a contradiction between some of the knowledge and innovation management research data, which is a subject for more complicated research.

Research limitations/implications

The paper compares analysis and comparison for time period 2004‐2009.

Originality/value

Identified problems of KI lagging can be successfully used as a base for KI management framework development. This paper reflects an original viewpoint of identification of the main hindering factors of KI as well as contradictory results of knowledge and innovation management research.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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