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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2016

Kevin Schoepp and Maurice Danaher

Industry and academia around the world stress the importance of professional skills (also known as soft skills, generic skills, or transferable skills) so it is necessary…

Abstract

Industry and academia around the world stress the importance of professional skills (also known as soft skills, generic skills, or transferable skills) so it is necessary to be able to assess students’ attainment of these skills. An innovative method was developed in the USA for assessment of these skills in an engineering program (Ater Kranov, Hauser, Olsen, & Girardeau, 2008); this method was based around student discussion of an open-ended, unresolved, discipline-related problem, held face-to-face and subsequently analyzed using a rubric. In the research project described here, the method was adapted for the United Arab Emirates by writing appropriate scenarios for computing students, by modifying the rubric and by running the discussion on an online discussion board. The primary aims were to determine the feasibility of adapting the method and to examine its suitability. The results of the study showed that the method can be adapted and employed very successfully with UAE students. This paper presents the method, its adaptation and implementation, and the results obtained.

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Abstract

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2011

Kevin Schoepp

Abstract

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Kevin Schoepp

This paper reports on one segment of a research project which investigates what faculty members perceive to be acting as barriers in their attempts to integrate…

Abstract

This paper reports on one segment of a research project which investigates what faculty members perceive to be acting as barriers in their attempts to integrate [information and communication] technology into their teaching at a laptop university. A web-based questionnaire was used to collect information from 69/288 (24%) faculty members from a small U.A.E. university. From the data gathered, patterns and associations emerged from which the researcher is able provide recommendations as to what type of interventions and programs could be provided to increase current levels of teaching with technology.

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Kevin Schoepp and Ingo Forstenlechner

The purpose of this paper is to add to knowledge on the environment of self‐initiated expatriates and the importance of family in determining expatriate retention. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to knowledge on the environment of self‐initiated expatriates and the importance of family in determining expatriate retention. It seeks to explore the role of family in an environment vastly different to that of previous research, one where expatriates are outnumbering citizens four to one. Further, the paper aims to explore familial adjustment differences that emerge amongst the different demographic segments within this expatriate majority environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on survey data obtained from 364 self‐initiated expatriates. Beyond a thorough demographic analysis providing additional background, data to test hypotheses were analyzed using SPSS and, where suitable, independent samples t‐test or one‐way ANOVA.

Findings

Evidence was found of what can be described as an environment easing expatriate adjustment as well as questioning the impact of many of the problems previously identified in literature on expatriates. Findings show an environment where some of the stressors associated with living abroad have been mitigated and family has more or less become a motivation to stay rather than to leave. In addition, the demographic analysis of expatriate faculty adds to knowledge about the globalization of higher education.

Practical implications

Definitions of what constitutes a hardship posting for expatriates may need to be revisited, taking into account national demographic characteristics. Current thinking on the expatriate family should also consider different settings where family may actually be a motivation to remain.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new perspective, as previous literature suggested family to be almost exclusively a reason for expatriate difficulties. Further, little focus has been made on countries where expatriates represent a large share or the majority of the population such as in several of the Arabian Gulf countries.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Ingo Forstenlechner

The introduction to this special issue aims to describe the papers published in this volume as well as the setting of labour markets in the Arabian Gulf as the basis for…

Abstract

Purpose

The introduction to this special issue aims to describe the papers published in this volume as well as the setting of labour markets in the Arabian Gulf as the basis for the understanding the relationship between expatriates and the indigenous workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the context is explained, followed by a description of the peculiarities of the research setting. Then, the articles in this special issue are described, followed by an outlook on the future of the expatriate‐citizen relationship and suggestions for future research in this area.

Findings

Thanks to the efforts of authors, reviewers, and the editors of this journal, every single one of the articles in this volume provides valuable insights from new perspectives on the theme of this special issue.

Originality/value

This special issue expands the understanding of a truly underrepresented topic.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Abstract

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Fiona Lettice

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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