Search results

1 – 10 of 180
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Neal Baker, Katherine Furlong, David Consiglio, Gentry Lankewicz Holbert, Craig Milberg, Kevin Reynolds and Joshua Wilson

The purpose of this paper is twofold. It first examines cross-institutional benchmark data about “library as place” from 99 US schools in the Measuring Information Service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. It first examines cross-institutional benchmark data about “library as place” from 99 US schools in the Measuring Information Service Outcomes (MISO) Survey (www.misosurvey.org). The data demonstrate the value of “library as place” to students in particular. Second, the paper shares case studies of how two college libraries made MISO Survey “library as place” data actionable. Lafayette College (Easton, Pennsylvania) analyzed local MISO Survey data after a renovation to validate return on investment. Earlham College (Richmond, Indiana) analyzed MISO Survey data to help secure a science library renovation and to justify an architectural study for its main library.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an analysis of “library as place” using aggregate benchmarks derived from US college and university respondents between 2012 and 2015. Specifically, the paper contrasts student and faculty perceptions of “library as place” via national benchmarks about: library services importance, satisfaction, and use (three benchmarks); hybrid online/“place-based” library services importance, satisfaction, and use (three benchmarks). Pivoting from higher education to individual, local perspectives, two case studies reveal how academic libraries used MISO Survey findings to demonstrate the value of “library as place” for renovation purposes.

Findings

The findings include that undergraduates make more frequent use than faculty of place-based services such as reference, equipment loans, and physical course reserves. Undergraduates also find most of these services more important than faculty do. Faculty makes generally more frequent use than undergraduates of online services such as library databases and the catalog. They find that these services to be more important than undergraduates do. Faculty and undergraduates use newer library discovery systems with equal frequency and find them to be equally important. Undergraduates find comfortable library spaces to be very important, and faculty considers them to be only a bit less important.

Originality/value

This is the first paper using MISO Survey data to focus on the importance and satisfaction of place-based library services involving cross-institutional comparisons for students and faculty. Previously published research using MISO Survey data have compared the use of place-based library services. This is also the first paper to offer case studies about how institutions use MISO Survey data to demonstrate the value of “library as place.”

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Kevin Reynolds, Nhan Nguyen, Eric Ting and James Urnes Sr

The purpose of this research is to explore innovative aircraft concepts that use flexible wings and distributed propulsion to significantly reduce fuel burn of future…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore innovative aircraft concepts that use flexible wings and distributed propulsion to significantly reduce fuel burn of future transport aircraft by exploiting multidisciplinary interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Multidisciplinary analysis and trajectory optimization are used to evaluate the mission performance benefits of flexible wing distributed propulsion aircraft concepts.

Findings

The flexible wing distributed propulsion aircraft concept was shown to achieve a 4 per cent improvement in L/D over a mission profile consisting of a minimum fuel climb, minimum fuel cruise and continuous descent.

Practical implications

The technologies being investigated may lead to mission adaptive aircraft that can minimize drag, and thus fuel burn, throughout the flight envelope.

Originality/value

The aircraft concepts being explored seek to create synergistic interactions between disciplines for reducing fuel burn while capitalizing on the potential benefits of lightweight, flexible wing structures and distributed propulsion.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology: An International Journal, vol. 86 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Lee Barron

Abstract

Details

Tattoos and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-215-2

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Mark Carpenter

This article is a broad reflection on some of the most common forms of artistic creation, including music, literature and cinema: – a reflection on how (and why) they may…

Abstract

This article is a broad reflection on some of the most common forms of artistic creation, including music, literature and cinema: – a reflection on how (and why) they may reach us and how they may be used or created effectively.

Details

Art in Diverse Social Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-897-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 December 2021

Mingming Ge, Xin-Lei Zhang, Kaleb Brookshire and Olivier Coutier-Delgosha

The openings on aircraft structures can be modeled from an aerodynamical point of view as lid-driven cavities (LDC). This paper aims to show the primary verification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The openings on aircraft structures can be modeled from an aerodynamical point of view as lid-driven cavities (LDC). This paper aims to show the primary verification and validation (V&V) process in computational fluid dynamics (CFD, and to investigate the influences of numerical settings on the efficiency and accuracy for solving the LDC problem.

Design/methodology/approach

To dig into the details of CFD approaches, this paper outlines the design, implementation, V&V and results of an efficient explicit algorithm. The parametric study is performed thoroughly focusing on various iteration methods, grid density discretization terms and Reynolds number effects.

Findings

This study parameterized the numerical implementation which provides empirical insights into how computational accuracy and efficiency are affected by changing numerical settings. At a low Reynolds number (not over 1,000), the time-derivative preconditioning is necessary, and k = 0.1 can be the optimal value to guarantee the efficiency, as well as the stability. A larger artificial viscosity (c = 1/16) would relieve the calculating oscillation issue but proportionally increase the discretization error. Furthermore, the iteration method and the mesh quality are two key factors that affect the convergence efficiency, thus need to be selected “wisely”.

Practical implications

The study shows how numerical implementation can enhance an accurate and efficient solution. This workflow can be used to determine the best parameter settings whenever CFD researchers applying this LDC problem as a complementary design tool for testing newly developed solvers.

Originality/value

The studied LDC problem is representative of CFD analysis in real aircraft structures. These numerical simulations provide a cost-effective and convenient tool to understand the parameter sensitivity, solution receptivity and physics of the CFD process.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Muhammad Aljukhadar and Sylvain Senecal

The purpose of this paper, building on the media richness theory (MRT), is to propose that while communicating product information via streaming video should enhance…

Downloads
1293

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, building on the media richness theory (MRT), is to propose that while communicating product information via streaming video should enhance outcome measures, such an enhancement will be evident mainly for users with equivocal, latent goals (i.e. recreational browsing) rather than for those with less equivocal, concrete goals (i.e. the search of a specific product).

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment involved 337 potential online consumers in Canada, and had full factorial design with four conditions (two methods to communicate product information: textual vs streaming video, and two goals: product searching vs recreational browsing). Analysis of covariance was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results lent support to the hypotheses. The perceived information quality, trusting competence, and arousal for participants with recreational browsing goals were significantly affected when product information where communicated using streaming video. For participants with concrete goals (product searchers), the traditional textual method was as effective as the streaming video method.

Practical implications

The findings entice practitioners to use rich media such as the streaming video method to communicate online information predominantly for users with experiential browsing goals, and to use lean media for users with less equivocal, concrete goals.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the sparse literature that underscores the key role of user goal in shaping the effectiveness of online information. The results provide empirical support to the prediction of MRT that the use of rich media to communicate information is advantageous for users with latent, equivocal goals.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2022

Todd Reynolds, Leslie S. Rush, Jodi Patrick Holschuh and Jodi P. Lampi

The purposes of this study is to expand on previous work in English language arts (ELA) disciplinary literacy and to unpack literary text reading processes across three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study is to expand on previous work in English language arts (ELA) disciplinary literacy and to unpack literary text reading processes across three different participant groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors recruited literary scholars and first-year college students to read literary texts aloud and voice their thoughts. Transcripts were collaboratively coded and analyzed using a priori and emergent coding.

Findings

This study presents the findings in two ways. First, this study grouped the codes into four categories, namely, background knowledge, comprehension, disciplinary knowledge and building an interpretation. This described the differences in frequencies among the participants’ strategy use. Next, to more fully describe how participants read literary texts, this study presents the data using three processes, namely, generating, weaving and curating. These findings indicate a continuum of strategies and processes used by participants.

Practical implications

The study suggests using the ELA heuristic for instruction, which includes moving students beyond generating and weaving by asking them to do their own interpretive work of curation. This potential roadmap for instruction avoids a deficit mindset for students by recommending low-stakes opportunities that meet students where they are as they build their capacity for interpretive moves.

Originality/value

The findings help the field to gain an understanding of what novices and experts do when they read literary text, including both strategies and processes. This study also provide an ELA heuristic that has instructional implications. This study adds to the body of knowledge for disciplinary literacy in ELA in both theoretical and practical ways.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-618-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Kevin LaMont Johnson, Wade M. Danis and Marc J. Dollinger

In this study we confirm the often assumed but largely untested belief that entrepreneurs think and behave differently than others. We examine a group of more than 700…

Downloads
1234

Abstract

In this study we confirm the often assumed but largely untested belief that entrepreneurs think and behave differently than others. We examine a group of more than 700 nascent entrepreneurs and 400 nonentrepreneurs. We determine the entrepreneurs’ cognitive style propensity for problem solving (Innovator versus Adaptor); we compare their expectations; and, we examine the outcomes (performance and start-up) of their ventures. We find that nascent entrepreneurs are more likely to be overly optimistic Innovators, most people are Adaptors, and oneʼs cognitive style can indeed play a role in the initial development and outcome for the venture, but not always as expected.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Neil Wilson, Michael Ross, Kevin Lafferty and Russell Jones

The concept of utilising greenspace to promote and maintain mental health predates the development of almost all current treatment modalities. Although the use of…

Abstract

The concept of utilising greenspace to promote and maintain mental health predates the development of almost all current treatment modalities. Although the use of greenspace as a therapeutic tool decreased throughout the 20th century, research in this area has grown exponentially over the last 20 years. This review examines the theory and increasing evidence base behind the psychological, social and physical health benefits of viewing and interacting with greenspace, and considers some of the common methodological limitations within the literature.Those who use secondary and tertiary care mental health services typically experience secondary problems due to reduced levels of social and physical activity. This review argues that the holistic benefits of greenspace make ecotherapy particularly appropriate for such a population. The review recommends that the effects of ecotherapy on those who use secondary and tertiary mental health care services be explored as part of an effort to redress the absence in the literature of quality studies in this area for this population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

1 – 10 of 180