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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Sarah Ayres, Mark Bevir and Kevin Orr

This article sets out a new research agenda for decentered public leadership. Nested in the concept of decentered theory, it examines the messy and contested nature of public…

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Abstract

This article sets out a new research agenda for decentered public leadership. Nested in the concept of decentered theory, it examines the messy and contested nature of public leadership practices in different contexts. Drawing on recent empirical studies that have adopted a decentered approach to examining public leadership, it sets out a future research agenda that places individuals, history and context at the heart of explanations for public leadership in action.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Kevin Orr and Mike Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to offer a reflexive account of the co‐production of a qualitative research project with the aim of illuminating the relationships between research…

1886

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a reflexive account of the co‐production of a qualitative research project with the aim of illuminating the relationships between research participants.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon personal experience of designing and conducting a research project into management learning, run jointly between an academic and a senior practitioner. The methodological issues involved and the reflexive dynamics of how the work of research collaboration is accomplished are considered.

Findings

Engaging with radical reflexivity helps to produce insights about the co‐production process.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field of reflexivity and is innovative in its context of academic‐practitioner research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Alessandro Sancino

The paper discusses the evolution of leadership practices performed by local political leaders in the last decade (2009–2019, a period which we might call post-global financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper discusses the evolution of leadership practices performed by local political leaders in the last decade (2009–2019, a period which we might call post-global financial crisis and pre-COVID-19). It offers some new theoretical concepts to make sense of emerging contemporary public leadership practices, namely: leaders-hip hop; charismatic followership; and digital fabrication of charisma (digital charisma).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a single case study, and it relies on qualitative data coming from multiple sources and collected at different points of time, specifically interviews, participant and non-participant observations from an ethnography conducted in 2009; interviews conducted between 2019 and 2020, and an analysis of the posts made within one Facebook group between February and May 2016.

Findings

The paper focuses on three stories of local political leadership at three different points in time which describe three leadership practices: political managerialism; charismatic followership; and hands-on relational leadership. It highlights the importance of hands-on relational leadership through popular acts of leadership which are performed face to face and/or on social media and the shift in the dominant technologies of local political leadership from the logic of managerialism toward the logic of social media.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is focused on a limited temporal (2009–2019) and sociocultural context (North Italy). Findings are presented as three stories, although other ways of showing qualitative data could have been used.

Practical implications

Practical implications deal with the attempt to enable a reflexive view of local governance and public leadership attentive to soft and sociocultural variables. It is important to consider these implications for the purposes of training and learning.

Originality/value

The paper introduces new concepts to understand contemporary public leadership practices; it combines insights from a decentered theory of governance and collective theories of leadership; and it makes use of storytelling as a method for analyzing and reporting the findings.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Kevin Orr and Robin Simmons

This paper problematises the experience of trainee teachers in further education (FE) colleges in England. It focuses on colleges as employers and developers of their own teaching…

1298

Abstract

Purpose

This paper problematises the experience of trainee teachers in further education (FE) colleges in England. It focuses on colleges as employers and developers of their own teaching staff, 90 per cent of whom are trained “in‐service”, while in paid employment. The paper aims to explore how a shift towards more expansive workplace practices could better develop these teachers and contribute towards enhancing the learning culture in FE.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on data gathered from two instrumental case studies of FE colleges focusing on the experience of in‐service teachers training in the workplace. Using Fuller and Unwin's expansive‐restrictive framework, the paper draws on qualitative data from interviews with trainee teachers, teacher educators and human resource managers. It critiques the current practice of colleges as employers and considers alternative strategies for workforce development.

Findings

This research finds that in‐service trainee FE teachers are expected to cope with heavy workloads almost immediately upon commencing employment and that these trainees are required to quickly make the transition to full practitioner. Consequently, opportunities to develop are restricted, often leading to conservative practice. There is evidence of the prioritisation of expedience over the development of professional knowledge and creative practice, a scenario that this paper challenges.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small‐scale qualitative research project based upon two colleges within a large and diverse sector of employment. As such, its findings do not claim to be representative of workplace practices experienced in all FE colleges. However, the research gives informed insight into some of the challenges trainee teachers are likely to face during the early stages of their employment.

Practical implications

The paper identifies strategies to challenge current practice and to enhance the work‐based learning experience of trainee teachers.

Originality/value

This paper considers FE colleges primarily as employers and explores the consequences of their employment practices on new teachers as both trainees and employees.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

José‐Rodrigo Córdoba‐Pachón and Kevin Orr

E‐government initiatives are becoming common worldwide, but conceptual elements to understand their development, implementation and consequences are still lacking. Drawing on a…

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Abstract

Purpose

E‐government initiatives are becoming common worldwide, but conceptual elements to understand their development, implementation and consequences are still lacking. Drawing on a contextualisation of e‐government in the information society and traditions in public policy, the aim of this paper is to offer three different patterns for thinking about e‐government. The paper's inter‐disciplinary and reflexive approach, as well as referencing a particular case (Colombian e‐government initiative Gobierno en Línea), seeks to unsettle the taken‐for‐granted aspects of the policy discourse of e‐government in ways that can illuminate practice.

Design/methodology/approach

From policy‐making and information systems, the authors review two dominant views on the information society to contextualise three patterns to think about e‐government. The first pattern (idealist) focuses on adopting a “vision” or “best practice” for government's use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The second pattern (strategic) emphasises the shaping of designs and uses of such technologies by different stakeholder groups. The third pattern (power‐based) conceives of any e‐government initiative as being the by‐product of power relations in a context, leading to different ways of thinking about e‐government (traditions). Analysis can then generate opportunities for the use of power by individuals and governments. The authors study these patterns in the Colombian e‐government initiative (Gobierno en Línea) by analysing relevant government policy strategic documents during the period 1997 to 2007 and validating these via a semi‐structured interview with the director of this initiative.

Findings

By using these patterns the authors are able to illuminate the complexity of e‐government initiatives, and how each pattern contributes a different way of understanding. In the Colombian case we find that these patterns are intertwined and require us to go deeper in thinking about the context of relations between individuals and their governments.

Practical implications

For public sector managers (and in particular for those in developing countries), the definition of these patterns can help them to assess critically the opportunities and limitations of the projects on e‐government in which they are involved. The findings also raise issues that can inform implementation strategies.

Originality/value

The paper presents an alternative and inter‐disciplinary perspective to the study of e‐government that unsettles taken‐for‐granted assumptions about it. Rather than accepting its idealist rhetoric uncritically, the paper provides individuals (citizens, researchers, policy makers) with ways to identify assumptions, strengths and weaknesses of our ways of thinking about it. The paper also opens opportunities to investigate contextual traditions that shape e‐government policy, implementation and use.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Content available
728

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekäle

361

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2014

Nicola Headlam

This is a paper about the soft and hard drivers for English sub-national governance. It posits that the recurrence of claims for inter-urban linkages across the two distinct…

Abstract

Purpose

This is a paper about the soft and hard drivers for English sub-national governance. It posits that the recurrence of claims for inter-urban linkages across the two distinct conurbations of the North-West of England have been bedevilled by entrenched differences in the leadership cultures of the city-regions.

Design/methodology/approach

It contrasts the highly localised forms of ‘soft power’ – or the ways in which leaders mobilise brands, plans and strategies to tell stories about place – arguing that there is a considerable divergence between the way that this symbolic capital has been deployed within and across the two city-regions. Whilst this is striking it is still true that ‘Hard powers’ – fiscal, legislative or regulatory mechanisms – are elusive for both Manchester and Liverpool notwithstanding recent moves towards combined authorities for both places. The only model of English urban governance with statutory powers covering transport, economic development and planning is located in Greater London, a legacy of the post-RDA institutional landscape in England.

Findings

This paper argues that it would be extraordinary if forms of leadership capable of meaningfully connecting the two cities cannot be found but that this must be seen within a sclerotic English context where there is a huge disconnect between desirable form and functions of urban governance, and the effect this has on regional economic performance. It concludes that local government austerity has had a negative effect on the sort of ‘soft power innovations’ necessary in both cities and that rhetorics of English localism have provided neither a propitious context for inter- nor intra-urban governance innovation.

Value/originality

This paper seeks to describe some of the ways in which collaborations within the city-regions of Manchester and Liverpool have been achieved, making the case that there have been divergent governance experiments which may hamper the aspiration for extensions beyond their border and for intra-urban leadership and governance which combines the two great cities and their areas of influence.

Details

European Public Leadership in Crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-901-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Kevin Keasey and Gianluca Veronesi

This paper seeks to analyse reasons behind the difficulties faced by Northern Rock (NR) and the UK financial system and proposes a return to a more traditional/prudent banking…

5075

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse reasons behind the difficulties faced by Northern Rock (NR) and the UK financial system and proposes a return to a more traditional/prudent banking business model, based on a sound balance between sources and uses of funds.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the background to the credit crunch and presents a simple model of a bank and NR's business model. Conclusions and implications are drawn.

Findings

It is suggested that credit rating agencies should provide a better assessment of the risks involved in securitised instruments by focusing on clarity and transparency and hence allowing liquidity risk of loan originators to be comprehensively understood. Moreover, the efficacy of the existing regulatory framework requires the tripartite system of supervision (Treasury, Bank of England, and FSA) to assume a more alert role in order to avoid asset bubbles in the first place rather than intervening ex post.

Originality/value

The paper will give rise to a series of new research streams – all of which are much needed, given the fragile state of the financial systems.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

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