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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

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Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

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Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Kevin McCabe, Rosie Summerton and Hester Parr

Arts can make an important contribution to the social inclusion of marginalised groups such as those with mental health problems. In this article three different voices …

Abstract

Arts can make an important contribution to the social inclusion of marginalised groups such as those with mental health problems. In this article three different voices ‐ those of the arts project user and artist, the project manager and artist, and the academic ‐ explain from their varying perspectives what this contribution may be, and how it operates. By enabling cultural citizenship, the arts provide a means for people who would otherwise remain on the margins of their communities to participate in public life and inhabit mainstream social spaces.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Mary Gatta and Kevin P. McCabe

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue on “the ‘new’ policy partnership”.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue on “the ‘new’ policy partnership”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper highlights the significance of policy‐academic partnerships and outlines the papers included in this issue.

Findings

It is important to form and maintain partnerships and collaborations with new nontraditional stakeholders. One place where this is evident is in academia.

Originality/value

The special issue includes original articles that address innovative ways in which researchers and policy makers can collaborate to move policy agendas forward.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Daniel Houser and Kevin McCabe

Neuroeconomics is the study of how the brain makes economic decisions. By its nature neuroeconomics studies the mechanisms of decision-making, assumed to be computational…

Abstract

Neuroeconomics is the study of how the brain makes economic decisions. By its nature neuroeconomics studies the mechanisms of decision-making, assumed to be computational, in order to better understand the strategies people use and the choices that people make. The focus of this book is how neuroeconomics connects to health economics in a way that improves our understanding of health care and treatment decisions. This is natural for several reasons. First, the brain and the body are intimately connected to each other and the health of one depends on the other. Second, the health system is inherently about decisions. Decisions to stay healthy, decisions to diagnose illness, decisions to treat, decisions to invest in new treatments, decisions to insure, and decisions to pay. Finally, these decisions can be difficult, as the media's consistent attention to this area attests. In light of this, for this volume we chose to include chapters that review basic research on emotion or social preference that have direct relevance to decisions in health economics. We have also included chapters that refer more specifically to some aspect of people's health care or treatment decisions. In the following we indicate the chapters within each topic area. Although many chapters could arguably fit in multiple categories, we have listed each chapter only once and without particular order.

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Virginia Doellgast

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215

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Frans van Winden, Mirre Stallen and K. Richard Ridderinkhof

Purpose – This chapter addresses the nature, formalization, and neural bases of (affective) social ties and discusses the relevance of ties for health economics. A social…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter addresses the nature, formalization, and neural bases of (affective) social ties and discusses the relevance of ties for health economics. A social tie is defined as an affective weight attached by an individual to the well-being of another individual (‘utility interdependence’). Ties can be positive or negative, and symmetric or asymmetric between individuals. Characteristic of a social tie, as conceived of here, is that it develops over time under the influence of interaction, in contrast with a trait like altruism. Moreover, a tie is not related to strategic behavior such as reputation formation but seen as generated by affective responses.

Methodology/approach – A formalization is presented together with some supportive evidence from behavioral experiments. This is followed by a discussion of related psychological constructs and the presentation of suggestive existing neural findings. To help prepare the grounds for a model-based neural analysis some speculations on the neural networks involved are provided, together with suggestions for future research.

Findings – Social ties are not only found to be important from an economic viewpoint, it is also shown that they can be modeled and related to neural substrates.

Originality/value of the chapter – By providing an overview of the economic research on social ties and connecting it with the broader behavioral and neuroeconomics literature, the chapter may contribute to the development of a neuroeconomics of social ties.

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

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