Search results

1 – 10 of 118
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Joon Kyoung Kim, Holly Overton, Kevin Hull and Minhee Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the public views two corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives practiced by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team…

1361

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the public views two corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives practiced by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team. This study examined the role of perceived fit between an MLB team and its two CSR initiatives in shaping consumers’ intentions to support the team’s CSR efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment (n=207) was conducted using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to examine the impact of CSR fit on consumers’ patronage intentions.

Findings

The results of this study showed that consumers’ perceived fit between sports teams and their CSR has a positive impact on consumers’ patronage intentions. The values-driven and strategic-driven attributions of the team’s CSR initiatives were positively associated with their patronage intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Both the values-driven and strategic-driven attributions were positively associated with consumers’ patronage intentions, while previous studies suggested negative association between strategic-driven attributions and consumer behaviors. The findings indicate that consumers do not view professional sports teams’ strategic-driven CSR initiatives to be negative business practices. This could result from the fact that CSR initiatives have become a prevalent and expected organizational practice.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of CSR within the context of professional sports teams as corporations. The findings of this study suggest that professional sports teams could benefit from CSR initiatives when the teams select social causes with which consumers could infer values-driven and strategic-driven attributions.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Kevin Hull and Julie E. Dodd

The purpose of this paper is to determine how higher education teachers are using Twitter in their classroom to engage, educate, and inform students. The results were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how higher education teachers are using Twitter in their classroom to engage, educate, and inform students. The results were measured against Chickering and Gamson (1987) “Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education.”

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was sent to college and university educators throughout the country who were identified as teachers who use Twitter in their classroom. These educators were asked about their Twitter use, their opinions of Twitter, the impact the social network has had on student learning, the students’ reactions to using Twitter, and how Twitter supported pedagogical best practices, including the “Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education”.

Findings

The educators reported that student response to using Twitter in the classroom was overwhelmingly positive and that Twitter has positively impacted student learning. The results also indicate that college educators consider that Twitter use in classes does support the seven principles.

Research limitations/implications

While college instructors from a wide range of institutions, locations, subject types, and experience levels were surveyed, a limitation is that only their opinions are being examined. Future research may wish to examine the Twitter accounts of these professors to determine if they are using Twitter in the manner that they think they are. Results from the survey could then be compared with the tweet content.

Originality/value

While previous research has examined how students use and appreciate Twitter in the classroom, this is one of the first studies to examine how the social network is implemented from an instructor viewpoint. The results demonstrate value to instructors. For instructors, the value lies in the knowledge that Twitter has had a positive impact on classroom success for students and that using the social network promotes best practices in pedagogy, supporting constructivism, experiential learning, and the “Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education”. For administrators, the value lies in the fact that many instructors have had success using Twitter and that more should be encouraged to do the same in their classrooms.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Joon K. Kim and Kevin Hull

Using uses and gratifications theory as a guide, the purpose of this paper is to examine how fans are engaging with Major League Baseball (MLB) teams that are utilizing…

1470

Abstract

Purpose

Using uses and gratifications theory as a guide, the purpose of this paper is to examine how fans are engaging with Major League Baseball (MLB) teams that are utilizing Instagram postings to demonstrate sporting, business, and social objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of 1,500 photos (50 from each team) was conducted. A content analysis analyzed the content of the photo, and a textual analysis was implemented to examine the use of hashtags by the teams on their Instagram photos.

Findings

Posts that overly demonstrated the business and social objectives had some of the lowest numbers of likes and comments, indicating that fan engagement is not often achieved through these methods.

Originality/value

Results of this research demonstrate that while MLB teams are able to address their multiple objectives on Instagram, fans are not necessarily interested in all three of these efforts. Posts about on-field action, consumer buying opportunities, and charitable efforts were all created by the majority of teams, but the sporting objective posts had, by far, the highest average number of both likes and comments when compared to the charitable and promotional objectives of the teams. Therefore, the results provide some best practices for teams looking to use the photo and video sharing network.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Abigail Breen, Sophie Brock, Katrina Crawford, Mary Docherty, Gavin Drummond, Lucy Gill, Sophie Lawton, Vivienne Mankarious, Andrea Oustayiannis, Gemma Rushworth and Kevin G. Kerr

Food‐borne infection remains a major public health concern and it is important that healthcare professionals in training understand the epidemiology of gastro‐intestinal…

700

Abstract

Purpose

Food‐borne infection remains a major public health concern and it is important that healthcare professionals in training understand the epidemiology of gastro‐intestinal infection and strategies for its prevention. This article describes a student selected component (SSC), i.e. an element which supplements the core curriculum for undergraduate medical students and its use as an educational tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The SSC incorporated a refrigerator safari in which students examined a number of domestic refrigerators for factors which might affect adversely the microbiological quality of the food within them as well as determining refrigerator temperatures with a sensitive thermometer.

Findings

The refrigerator safaris, although small in number (n=25) highlighted a number of frequently occurring factors such as unacceptable refrigerator temperatures and foods which had passed their use by/best before dates. Student feedback indicated that the safari was much appreciated as a practical way of learning about food safety.

Originality/value

The refrigerator safari is a novel method for the teaching of undergraduate students about food hygiene in the domestic setting and emphasises that consumers have important roles and responsibilities in protecting themselves from food‐borne infection.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Tony Hall, Cornelia Connolly, Seán Ó Grádaigh, Kevin Burden, Matthew Kearney, Sandy Schuck, Jeroen Bottema, Gerton Cazemier, Wouter Hustinx, Marie Evens, Ton Koenraad, Eria Makridou and Panagiotis Kosmas

This paper is based on the emergency changes we have had to make in the European DEIMP Project (2017-2020), “Designing and Evaluating Innovative Mobile Pedagogies”…

7049

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is based on the emergency changes we have had to make in the European DEIMP Project (2017-2020), “Designing and Evaluating Innovative Mobile Pedagogies” (DEIMP). DEIMP is undertaken by a transnational consortium comprising partner institutions and schools from the UK (coordinating), Australia, Belgium, Cyprus, Ireland and The Netherlands. As well as the enforced changes to the project, there have been major adjustments in how education is being provided in each of our countries, across all sectors: primary, secondary and tertiary. The purpose of this paper is to provide pragmatic guidelines that will help us respond effectively in the uncertain present, and plan systematically for an unpredictable, post-pandemic future.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors outline 21 design principles underpinning innovative mobile learning, which will be of pragmatic use to all using mobile learning in the COVID-19 pandemic. These principles have emerged in the context of the three-year European DEIMP Project (2017-2020). The authors also examine major educational changes that have recently been imposed upon teachers and educational researchers, and key aspects of the current emergency response in education internationally, and resultant implications for educational technology and mobile learning.

Findings

A living record highlighting what is currently happening in the educational systems of the DEIMP project’s respective partner countries. The paper outlines design concerns and issues, which will need to be addressed as the authors endeavour to bridge both the digital divide and digital use divide in remote education. Furthermore, the paper illustrates 21 pragmatic design principles underpinning innovative mobile pedagogies.

Originality/value

A comparative study of the effects of the pandemic across six countries, including The UK, Australia, Belgium, Cyprus, Ireland and The Netherlands. The authors outline 21 design principles for mobile learning, which is hoped will help us respond effectively in the uncertain present, and plan systematically for an unpredictable, post-pandemic future.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Kevin John Burden and Matthew Kearney

This study aims to investigate contemporary mobile learning practices in teacher education, exploring the following research question: how are teacher educators exploiting…

3027

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate contemporary mobile learning practices in teacher education, exploring the following research question: how are teacher educators exploiting the pedagogical features of mobile learning?

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses data from an online survey that elicited information about how 46 teacher educator participants were using distinctive mobile pedagogical features (Personalisation, Authenticity and Collaboration) in their mobile learning practices. It uses the iPAC theoretical framework to analyse the data collected.

Findings

Findings indicated high self-ratings of authenticity, and positive perceptions of collaborative sharing (Collaboration construct), often involving generative tasks that required use of creative, media production mobile applications. There were weaker perceptions of personalisation and online conversation (Collaboration construct). In light of these findings, we discuss implications for teacher education and recommend future directions for research and development.

Research limitations/implications

This study underlines our contention that teacher educators struggle to exploit the entire range of mobile pedagogical approaches. The findings suggest that teacher educators are cautiously exploring the potential for online collaboration mediated through mobile devices, but have not yet fully grasped the opportunities to design tasks which exploit (and model) the personalised nature of m-learning. The limitations of the study include the size of the sample (46), its self-selected nature and its bias towards Australian and the UK respondents.

Practical implications

In response to the issues raised in this paper, the authors are developing a mobile learning toolkit (www.mobilelearningtoolkit.com) for teacher educators.

Originality/value

There is a scarcity of m-learning studies in teacher education exploring pedagogical insights, and the views of teacher educators themselves are often absent.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Kevin Orr and Mike Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to offer a reflexive account of the co‐production of a qualitative research project with the aim of illuminating the relationships between…

1620

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a reflexive account of the co‐production of a qualitative research project with the aim of illuminating the relationships between research participants.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon personal experience of designing and conducting a research project into management learning, run jointly between an academic and a senior practitioner. The methodological issues involved and the reflexive dynamics of how the work of research collaboration is accomplished are considered.

Findings

Engaging with radical reflexivity helps to produce insights about the co‐production process.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field of reflexivity and is innovative in its context of academic‐practitioner research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2010

Claire Griffiths and Kevin Bales

Kevin Bales' work on contemporary slavery has brought this under‐researched field of social enquiry to the attention not only of the academic world but to a wider global…

1671

Abstract

Purpose

Kevin Bales' work on contemporary slavery has brought this under‐researched field of social enquiry to the attention not only of the academic world but to a wider global audience through his prolific publishing, his film work and not least his presidency of Free the Slaves, the US anti‐slavery organisation. The purpose of this paper is to explore some of his findings and methodologies currently prevailing in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an interview with Kevin Bales conducted in April 2009 and subsequent discussions with Claire Griffiths.

Findings

Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy, the book that brought Bales global recognition over a decade ago, reinstated slavery as a key human rights issue on the research agenda for the twenty‐first century. This interview is condensed from a longer discussion between Kevin Bales and Claire Griffiths on researching contemporary slavery. In this conversation they explore the relationship between slavery, trafficking and prostitution, a theme that leads the discussion to the gendered nature of slavery through the centuries. The interview concludes with some indications of where slavery studies research is going in the twenty‐first century.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insights into the emerging and interdisciplinary field of modern slavery studies.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sushie Jayne Dobbinson

Since often missed in forensic care settings, little is known about how the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) social and communication deficit impacts on rehabilitation work…

Abstract

Purpose

Since often missed in forensic care settings, little is known about how the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) social and communication deficit impacts on rehabilitation work, particularly when accompanied by intellectual disability. The purpose of this paper is to show how Baron-Cohen’s empathizing – systemizing theory can elucidate common processes in the interaction-based risk-reduction work carried on between ASD forensic patients and their clinicians.

Design/methodology/approach

Conversation analysis (CA) is used to analyse the talk of two ASD men engaged in risk reduction work with their clinicians on a forensic intellectual disability ward in a medium secure psychiatric hospital in the UK. The clinicians include two forensic nurses and a speech and language therapist.

Findings

Clinicians adapt to their patients’ systematic processes particularly with regard to helping them understand complex social phenomena such as others’ emotional displays and their understanding of empathy.

Practical implications

Since ASD in forensic care is poorly researched, clinicians have little in the way of guidance about the interactive strengths and weaknesses of their ASD patients, despite risk reduction work being carried out by means of conversational interactions. This paper demonstrates some key aspects of ASD clinical interactions which may be used to inform treatment strategies elsewhere in the forensic establishment.

Originality/value

By using Baron-Cohen’s empathizing systemizing theory in combination with CA, this paper aims to bring understanding of ASD interaction up to date. This is of particular importance for this poorly researched patient group, who, because of the way in which they differ to standard psychiatric patients, are at risk of being detained for lengthy periods where treatment strategies are not designed to fit their social and communicative profiles.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

1 – 10 of 118