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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Andrew Day and Kevin Howells

Surveys of offender treatment programmes have revealed that practitioners delivering specialist programmes are often unaware of much of the theoretical and research…

Abstract

Surveys of offender treatment programmes have revealed that practitioners delivering specialist programmes are often unaware of much of the theoretical and research literature behind the interventions they deliver. For practitioners working less routinely with offenders, such as forensic nurses, this problem is likely to be more acute. In this paper, we provide a general overview of the theoretical and research literature relevant to programmes targeting sexual and aggressive offending that should be of interest to a range of professionals working with offenders in different clinical settings.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Michael Daffern, James Ogloff and Kevin Howells

There is a considerable body of research on the assessment and prediction of aggression in psychiatric hospitals. A range of clinical and demographic characteristics…

Abstract

There is a considerable body of research on the assessment and prediction of aggression in psychiatric hospitals. A range of clinical and demographic characteristics associated with aggressive inpatients, such as young age and active symptoms of psychosis, have repeatedly been shown to contribute to aggression. Environmental factors have also been shown to be important. The study examined aggressive behaviours in an Australian forensic psychiatric hospital, using aggression‐specific recording instrumentation developed for the study. The purpose of the study was to compare results using aggression specific‐recording instrumentation with a previous study using retrospective methods relying on standard hospital incident forms, and to examine the relationship between type, direction and severity of aggression with the use of seclusion.In contrast with the results obtained in a previous study, staff rather than patients were more often the victims of both verbal and physical aggression, although patients were more frequently the victims of more severe forms of aggression. Patients were verbally and physically aggressive towards other patients at similar rates, although they were more frequently verbally, rather than physically, aggressive to staff. Acute wards recorded more aggression than rehabilitation wards. Males and females were aggressive at similar rates. A reduction in reported incidents of verbal and physical aggression, particularly against staff, occurred over the course of the study. Patients were secluded and incident forms were completed following approximately 30% of aggressive behaviours. Whether or not a patient was secluded and whether or not an incident form was completed depended on a range of factors, including the nature of the victim and the type and severity of the aggression.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Graham Towl and Norman McClelland

Abstract

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

David Crighton and Graham Towl

Abstract

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Valerie K. York, Laura A. Brannon, Carol W. Shanklin, Kevin R. Roberts, Betsy B. Barrett and Amber D. Howells

This paper aims to evaluate the relative effectiveness of four‐hour ServSafe® food safety training, a theory‐based intervention targeting food service employees' perceived…

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2944

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the relative effectiveness of four‐hour ServSafe® food safety training, a theory‐based intervention targeting food service employees' perceived barriers to implementing food safety practices, and a combination of the two treatments. Dependent measures include behavioral compliance with and perceptions of control over performing hand washing, use of thermometers, and handling of work surfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Four groups are compared: employees receiving only ServSafe® training, intervention alone, training and intervention, and no treatment. Employees complete a questionnaire assessing perceived barriers to practicing the targeted behaviors. Then, employees are observed in the production area for behavioral compliance.

Findings

Training or intervention alone is better than no treatment, but the training/intervention combination is most effective at improving employees' compliance with and perceptions of control over performing the behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to restaurant employees in three states within the USA, in only 31 of the 1,298 restaurants originally contacted. Future research should identify barriers of other types of food service employees and evaluate the effectiveness of these and other intervention strategies.

Practical implications

ServSafe® training can be enhanced with a simple intervention targeting food service employees' perceived barriers to food safety. Providing knowledge and addressing barriers are both important steps to improving food safety in restaurants.

Originality/value

No previous research has used the theory of planned behavior to develop an intervention targeting food service employees' perceived barriers to implementing food safety practices. Research also has not attempted to improve the effectiveness of ServSafe® food safety training by adding an intervention.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sport, Gender and Mega-Events
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-937-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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57116

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Andy Smith

To examine some of the complex relationships that exist between sports work and mental health and illness.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine some of the complex relationships that exist between sports work and mental health and illness.

Design/Method/Approach

This chapter draws upon prevalence data, athlete testimonies, and theoretical works to examine: (1) the prevalence of depression and suicide in professional sport and the wider society; (2) athlete experiences of depression and suicidal ideation, particularly among men; and (3) some of the key sociological ideas which might help to explain experiences of mental health and illness in professional sports work.

Findings

Although there are plentiful data on the societal prevalence of depression and suicide, increasing interest in the mental health of professional athletes (and other types of sports workers) has occurred largely in response to individual or clusters of often publicly known, sometimes high profile, cases rather than in response to systematic empirical grounded data. Athlete experiences of mental illness are shown to be related in complex ways to various constraints associated with their public and private lives, to the constraints of their interdependency networks, and to experiences of shame which can have a series of deleterious acute and chronic health costs.

Research Limitations/Implications

Since much of what is currently known about the links between sports work and mental health and illness is derived from largely psychological studies and media-led or autobiographical accounts, more sociological research is needed to better understand the costs of mental health of working in often very public and highly pressurized, medicalized, scientized, and performance-focused performance sport settings.

Details

Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

James Ward and Di Bailey

Purpose – To consider the unique ethical dilemmas, such as limitations in confidentiality, that research in prison settings is required to address.Methodology/approach …

Abstract

Purpose – To consider the unique ethical dilemmas, such as limitations in confidentiality, that research in prison settings is required to address.

Methodology/approach – The ethics of prison-based research are explored within the context of a three-year Participatory Action Research (PAR) project which aimed to involve staff and women in prison in the development of care pathways for self-harm.

Findings – The ethics of prison research are complex and require the balancing of individual rights with prison security requirements. In keeping with the PAR approach the experience for two of the women of being involved in the research and action for change is discussed through their own accounts.

Originality/value of paper – PAR has not been previously used in an English prison; this article provides an account of the ethical considerations of empowering methodologies with people who by their very status as prisoners are disempowered.

Research implications – Although this is just one example within a women's prison the authors assert that PAR as a methodology within a prison environment is not only feasible but also desirable for engaging offenders in the development of services.

Practical implications – The engagement of this traditionally ‘hard to reach’ groups of people can ensure the development of meaningful and effective services based upon service user's experiential expertise (Beresford, 2000).

Social implications – PAR offers those in prison a stake in the development and design of services. This not only has personal benefits for the individual but also is likely to increase service uptake and relevance (Foster, J., Tyrell, K., Cropper, V., & Hunt, N. (2005). Welcome to the team – Service users in staff recruitment. Drink and Drugs News, 21).

Details

Ethics in Social Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-878-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Susan W. Arendt, Kevin R. Roberts, Catherine Strohbehn, Jason Ellis, Paola Paez and Janell Meyer

The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges encountered when conducting qualitative research in foodservice operations and to discuss the strategies to overcome…

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3549

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges encountered when conducting qualitative research in foodservice operations and to discuss the strategies to overcome the identified challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers conducted food safety observations, interviews, and focus groups with more than 600 foodservice employees and managers. The researchers encountered multiple challenges including institutional review board approvals, managements' willingness to participate, and organizational and cultural barriers.

Findings

Obtaining in‐depth, credible information through observations, interviews, and focus groups adds depth and breadth to hospitality studies. However, given high industry turnover, recruitment and retention throughout a study is problematic. Moreover, researchers encounter many barriers as they obtain data, such as establishing authenticity and overcoming Hawthorne and halo effects.

Originality/value

Strategies to increase participation and thereby improve qualitative research have not been previously addressed in the hospitality literature

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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