Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Gavin Dick, Kevin Gallimore and Jane C. Brown

The article examines the usage and relative importance of quality measurements in the UK’s largest service companies. The authors analyse the relationship of both internal…

Abstract

The article examines the usage and relative importance of quality measurements in the UK’s largest service companies. The authors analyse the relationship of both internal and customer‐based quality measurements to the importance placed on accreditation to an ISO 9000 standard. The effect of process structure is explored by categorising the service firms as being in front‐room or back‐room dominant service sectors. The authors find that the service firms, which consider accreditation to be important, have a different emphasis on quality than other service firms do. Significantly, their emphasis shifts from one that is in line with their process structure to a more balanced one, where both internal and customer‐based quality measurements receive similar attention. This leads them to conclude that accreditation to an ISO 9000 standard can make a profound difference to the way quality is perceived and measured in large service firms.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Gavin Dick, Kevin Gallimore and Jane C. Brown

This paper seeks to illuminate how the emphasis on quality dimensions differs in service firms dependent on the size of their back‐room activity. It examines how that…

Abstract

This paper seeks to illuminate how the emphasis on quality dimensions differs in service firms dependent on the size of their back‐room activity. It examines how that emphasis differs with Quality Certification (QCert). The research examines the relative importance attached by the chief executives of 93 large service organisations to both internal and external dimensions of quality. It analyses the relationship of these quality dimensions to the importance placed on the possession of QCert. The effect of process structure is explored by categorising service firms as being in front‐room versus back‐room dominant industrial sectors. The research findings provide empirical evidence that service firms who rate the possession of QCert as important, place much more emphasis on quality, and have a balanced perspective where internal and external quality are both emphasised. In contrast, service firms that do not promote QCert, emphasise quality less. In the absence of QCert, we find clear differentiation in how quality is conceptualised in front‐room versus back‐room dominant industrial sectors.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Bioye Tajudeen Aluko

The purpose of this research is to examine whether valuers consider and interpret intrinsic value elements in a residential property the same way in a familiar location…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine whether valuers consider and interpret intrinsic value elements in a residential property the same way in a familiar location. The price people pay for a complex commodity like residential property is a sum of the utility of various intrinsic and extrinsic characteristics. The skill of the valuer rests in the recognition of value‐enhancing elements in order to arrive at a value for the subject property.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant data for the study were gathered from a controlled‐experiment involving some residential properties and administration of questionnaires backed up with oral interviews on a random sample of 59 valuation firms in metropolitan Lagos, a commercial nerve‐center in the country. The data were analyzed using both descriptive statistics and analysis of variance.

Findings

The study showed that there are differences in the means and interpretation of value‐enhancing variables amongst valuation firms sampled. The study, inter alia, concluded that non‐duplicative nature of real estate, differences in the skills and degree of technical competence of the valuation firms including length of practice, absence of a centralized database and lack of valuation practice statements as well as updated guidance notes are the key factors, amongst others, responsible for the variability in the valuers' judgement in the study area.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the empirical literature in valuation accuracy by establishing the level of interpretative errors in residential property valuations and the key factors responsible for the variability in the valuers' judgement in the study area.

Details

Property Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Hoa Thi Nguyen and Dung Thi Nguyet Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of mutual funds’ performance at both a country level and a fund level in Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of mutual funds’ performance at both a country level and a fund level in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The different types of funds with more than three-year operation are selected to remove outliers of the stock market boom from 2015 to 2018. The data set includes 54 mutual funds operating during the period from 2008 until November 2018.

Findings

The research finds that there is a positive relationship between macroeconomics and mutual funds’ performance. Furthermore, country-level governance such as regulation effectiveness, political stability, economic growth and financial development has a positive correlation with mutual funds’ performance. However, the impact of fund-level factors is diverse with the no significant impact of board size on mutual fund’s performance, while passive funds perform better than active funds in Vietnam.

Practical implications

The research results suggest that investors should pay attention to the types of funds and operating expense when making an investment decision in mutual funds. There are some recommendations for both government policy-makers and the mutual fund industry that are likely to facilitate the development of this field in Vietnam.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of what are the factors that should be considered when investing in mutual funds.

Details

Journal of Economics and Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-5330

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Pat McAllister

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main…

Abstract

Purpose

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main categories of institutional investors, the key tasks in real estate operational management, and the ways in which these tasks are typically bundled and categorised by investment managers are reviewed. Three broad operational management models are outlined. Case studies of real estate operational management models in practice are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is primarily descriptive, drawing upon illustrative investor case studies.

Findings

A range of operating models are identified for managing real estate investment portfolios. Specialists real estate investors tend to have highly vertically integrated operating models viewing most operational management functions as core operational capabilities. Multi-asset owners tend to have a vertically disintegrated operating model outsourcing fund, asset, property and facilities management. Investing institutions such as fund houses and specialist real estate investment advisors seem to have converged upon a common hybrid operating model with high margin, analytical functions such as fund and asset management being insourced and low margin, routine functions such as property and facilities management being outsourced.

Originality/value

Despite the size of the global, institutional real estate investment universe (estimated by DTZ to be worth more than USD 13.6 trillion in 2015), the topic of how (and how effectively) these assets are managed by institutional investors has attracted very little attention from the real estate research community. This paper provides some initial analysis and insights into operational management models for real estate investment portfolios in the contemporary real estate investment management landscape.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5