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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Kevin Downing, Flora Ning and Kristina Shin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of problem‐based learning (PBL) in higher education based on a large sample of first‐year undergraduates from two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of problem‐based learning (PBL) in higher education based on a large sample of first‐year undergraduates from two programmes at a Hong Kong University (n=132). One programme uses an entirely problem‐based approach to learning, whilst the other uses traditional methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) as a measure of metacognition, differences in metacognitive development are explored between each group of students between the beginning and end of their first 15 months in each programme.

Findings

Despite significantly weaker entry scores on the LASSI, the mean final scores, taken after 15 months and three semesters of study in the different curriculum environments demonstrate dramatic improvements in metacognition for the PBL group. In addition, analysis of student learning experience measured at the end of the programme revealed that the PBL group reported significantly higher scores in their overall course satisfaction and generic skills development.

Practical implications

The paper argues that, in addition to the formal learning context, everyday challenges emerging from the additional new social contexts provided by problem‐based curricula provide fertile environments for the development of metacognition and enhancement of the learning experience. The implications of PBL environments on fostering constructivist learning and enhancing student experience are discussed.

Originality/value

This research is original in its use of the LASSI inventory as a pre‐ and post‐measure of metacognitive development in undergraduates. This is an online questionnaire administered to two groups of students following similar programmes except one is problem based and the other more traditional, and the results are strikingly significant.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Theresa Kwong, Eva Wong and Kevin Downing

The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the integration of learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) with the City University of Hong Kong information systems to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the integration of learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) with the City University of Hong Kong information systems to promote teaching and learning within the university.

Design/methodology/approach

From the 2006 entry cohort, all undergraduate freshmen at City University of Hong Kong are required to complete LASSI online through Administrative Information Management System (AIMS). Each student is required to take LASSI at three specific times during their undergraduate careers. With the cooperation of H&H publishing, City University has developed a program within AIMS to upload LASSI results of individual students so that the students can view their scores whenever they wish to. In addition to helping the students develop their learning and study strategies, the integration between LASSI and the university's information system provides academic staff with aggregated LASSI scores for their students.

Findings

The integration of LASSI with the university's information systems is found to be useful as students have the possibility of reviewing their progress in terms of learning and study strategies while teachers can design appropriate teaching and learning activities according to the relative strengths and weaknesses in learning of their own classes to assist students. In addition, the input of LASSI data to the City University AIMS helps administrative personnel correlate LASSI results with the other detailed information available in the AIMS.

Originality/value

This paper provides other institutions with insights into the integration of LASSI with the university's information systems to enhance the teaching and learning environment within the university. It aims to inform decision makers of issues in centralizing and accessing students' data to improve teaching and learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Kevin Downing, Sui‐Wah Chan, Woo‐Kyung Downing, Theresa Kwong and Tsz‐Fung Lam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants for this study were selected at random from the overall LASSI sampling exercise and males and females were compared using the LASSI scales at a Hong Kong University.

Findings

Gender differences in cognitive functioning and achievement do not always favour one sex with the literature related to intelligence testing suggesting that males outperform females on tests of visuo‐spatial ability, and mathematical reasoning whereas females do better on tests involving memory and language use. This paper examines relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores (LASSI) of undergraduate students and argues that whilst there are significant gender differences in A‐level scores, these provide limited practical information at a cognitive level. In contrast, the data from LASSI allows a more detailed and practical metacognitive analysis suggesting significant gender differences in certain areas of self‐perceived performance, with females demonstrating significantly higher levels of self‐regulation and a more positive attitude to academic study than their male counterparts.

Originality/value

The analysis of the data produced by the LASSI indicates that there are significant differences in self‐perceived metacognition between the genders.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Richard Lynch, Soon Leo and Kevin Downing

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a management development programme based on situated learning theory resulted in change for individuals, organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a management development programme based on situated learning theory resulted in change for individuals, organisational culture and performance. The case study illustrates how new understandings about learning in the workplace and in higher education points towards the need to take account of the context in which learners utilise their knowledge and skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative strategies were used to provide an evaluation of the impact of a management development programme in a group of companies. A questionnaire, focus groups and semi‐structured interviews were used to collect data on three cohorts of supervisors and middle managers at different stages of the programme. A triangulated approach was adopted towards data analysis that illuminated a broad and deep change process.

Findings

Positive cultural change was a significant benefit to the host organisation from the training programme. It was apparent that training can move beyond individual development to bring about organisational gains.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might adopt a longitudinal design and facilitate a co‐researcher approach using students' learning logs of workplace experiences.

Practical implications

Situated approaches to learning in higher education and the workplace need to be developed further to enhance workplace performance. A proposal is made for “learning consultants” to move between the two environments and facilitate knowledge exchange and improve understanding of the variety of learning contexts in business and educational settings.

Originality/value

A data driven case study on the relationship between training, culture and organisational performance suggests that new approaches to learning require partnerships between the worlds of work and university that traverses theory, practice and personnel.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Case study
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Praveen Gupta, Ankita Nagpal and Diksha Malik

Students after reading the case will learn about the issues and challenges of expansion in emerging markets. Global expansion versus multinational expansion…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Students after reading the case will learn about the issues and challenges of expansion in emerging markets. Global expansion versus multinational expansion. Stardardization versus localization. Socio-cultural aspects in international marketing. Leadership succession in multinational companies.

Case overview/synopsis

The case is about Starbucks’ journey of global expansion. It focuses on challenges in emerging markets. It also talks about the challenges to new CEO Kevin Johnson post stepping down of iconic leader Howard Schultz.

Complexity academic level

MBA Executive MBA Specialisation in Strategy, International Marketing.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Note are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 5: International Business.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Laurie L. Levesque, Denise M. Rousseau and Violet T. Ho

Kevin McRider, the COO of a fledging research facility, needed to foster an environment where scientists explored the boundaries of the metals, chemicals, polymers and…

Abstract

Kevin McRider, the COO of a fledging research facility, needed to foster an environment where scientists explored the boundaries of the metals, chemicals, polymers and tools used to create innovating medical devices. The freshly-minted PhDs he hired were enthusiastic to design and conduct research projects that bridged their scientific disciplines, in a collaborative workplace, with time allocated to individual projects as well. Effectively managed, their research would help the parent corporation leapfrog over existing or near-future technology.

The problem for McRider was how to get Lintell to realize his vision of a collaborative organizational culture that promoted revolutionary scientific discoveries. His challenges included managerial behaviors that prohibited critical interaction and information sharing, as well as disruptive organizational dynamics he himself had set in motion including pressures to focus only on certain research goals and projects at the expense of creative exploration, and the violation of the psychological contracts McRider himself had created with the scientists during recruitment.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Beatrice Yan-yan Dang

This study aims to explore the opportunities and constraints for learner identity formation among community college transfer students.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the opportunities and constraints for learner identity formation among community college transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from four in-depth interviews with five transfer students across an academic year (i.e. 20 interviews in total). The first interview allowed the current researcher to explore the context of students' community college experiences and their first semester in the university. The second and third interview had two purposes: (1) to provide an opportunity for students to discuss their second semester experiences and (2) to understand the process of learner identity formation. The last interview allowed the students to reflect on their time in the university after studying for one year.

Findings

The findings reveal that higher education (HE) learner identity was nurtured by peer support, orientation activities and mentorship programme. While, striving for self-improvement and developing into an autonomous and active learner are essential in the formation of the HE learner identity in university.

Originality/value

This study represents the local students' voice that enrolling in community colleges with the goal of transferring to University Grant Committee (UGC)-funded universities. Transition is a process of change in the course of life and also a shift from one identity to another (Ecclestone et al., 2010). A smooth transition may contribute to the formation of positive learner identity, which is essential to student retention and persistence.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Executive summary
Publication date: 2 August 2021

UNITED STATES: Trump campaign chest gives him options

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES263186

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Polly Björk-Willén

The overall aim of the chapter is to explore how preschoolers with different language backgrounds accomplish everyday interaction at a Swedish preschool, where the lingua

Abstract

Purpose

The overall aim of the chapter is to explore how preschoolers with different language backgrounds accomplish everyday interaction at a Swedish preschool, where the lingua franca (common language) is Swedish. More specifically, it aims to analyze how the target children, despite their limited language resources in Swedish, use their existing communicative resources to make friends and achieve intersubjectivity in front of two alphabet charts illustrating the Arabic and Latin alphabets, respectively.

Methodology/approach

The data are drawn from a single play episode between three boys and a girl, aged four years. Their interaction was video-recorded, and the analytical framework of the study is influenced by ethnomethodological work on social action focusing particularly on participants’ methodical ways of accomplishing and making sense of social activities.

Findings

The analyses show that the children’s trajectory of achieving intersubjectivity was partly bothersome as their interpretation of the alphabet charts diverged, due to their different language knowledge and earlier experiences. Hence, to attain joint understanding and intersubjectivity, they used a range of communicative resources: besides speaking Swedish they used word mixing, attention-getters (“look” and “check it out”), and nonverbal moves such as pointing, gesturing, intone, and screaming. It is notable that, despite some problems in understanding, their desire to make friends and have fun together seemed to compensate for their joint failure to always understand each other.

Practical implications

Detailed analyses and observations of how children with diverse language backgrounds use their communicative resources to achieve intersubjectivity and make friends can be useful for preschool teachers’ understanding of how they can further support the children’s socialization and capturing of the majority language – here Swedish.

Originality/value

The present chapter contributes to a wider understanding of how second-language learning is a complex trajectory edged with both setbacks and successes, especially when all the children interacting have diverse language backgrounds and experiences. However, the analysis highlights how, in their endeavor to make friends, the children find ways to solve problems in situ in their own way, and enjoy each other’s company despite the fragility of the play and their language shortcomings.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

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