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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Peter BeomCheol Kim and Kevin D. Carlson

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether agreement between frontline employee self-ratings and supervisory ratings of service performance functions as an indicator…

1039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether agreement between frontline employee self-ratings and supervisory ratings of service performance functions as an indicator of healthy supervisor-subordination relationships above and beyond what might be indicated simply by either supervisory ratings or self-ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses were tested using a sample of 220 matched pairs of frontline service workers and their immediate supervisors from nine full service hotels in the USA.

Findings

The results show that higher levels of agreement in service performance ratings between employees and supervisors is associated with higher levels of leader-member exchange (LMX) and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

Senior managers can refer to the level of performance rating agreement between customer service employees and their supervisors in assessing supervisors’ competency to manage their work relationship with their subordinates.

Originality/value

This study examined rating agreement in a service performance context and found rating agreement between subordinates and their supervisor may have a unique effect on service worker effectiveness, producing a unique incremental effect on LMX and organizational commitment. This is important given that few attempts have been made to examine service performance from both subordinates’ and supervisors’ perspectives and the implication that rating agreement may have for improving employee service performance.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Mary L. Connerley, Kevin D. Carlson and Ross L. Mecham

Despite general assumptions that recruitment is important to organizational success, little empiric evidence exists to confirm that different recruitment approaches lead…

3582

Abstract

Despite general assumptions that recruitment is important to organizational success, little empiric evidence exists to confirm that different recruitment approaches lead to meaningful differences in attraction outcomes. This study begins to address this research need by examining the attraction outcomes of firms competing head‐to‐head for recruits for similar positions. Results of an analysis of 391 applicant pools representing 18 different job families suggest that applicant pool quality can vary substantially within and across job families. Utility estimates, based on the hiring of a single employee and using Grade Point Average (GPA) as a measure of applicant quality, produced differences within applicant pools for hiring a single individual valued as high as $15,000. The average difference between the highest and lowest quality applicant pools across 18 job families was $6,394.45 (SD = $3,533.20).

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kevin D Carlson and Donald E Hatfield

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the…

Abstract

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the absence of metrics for gauging research progress that is most limiting. We propose that research should focus on measures of effect size and that “precision” and “generalizability” in our predictions of important phenomena represent the core metrics that should be used to judge whether progress is occurring. We then discuss how to employ these metrics and examine why existing research practices are likely to hinder efforts to develop cumulative knowledge.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2009

Anju Seth, Kevin D. Carlson, Donald E. Hatfield and Hung-Wen Lan

Purpose: The purpose of the paper is twofold: first, to examine whether the progress of strategic management research has been damaged by an excessive focus on statistical…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the paper is twofold: first, to examine whether the progress of strategic management research has been damaged by an excessive focus on statistical significance to the exclusion of substantive significance and second, to provide recommendations for improving research practice toward establishing the substantive significance of empirical findings.

Methodology/Approach: We conduct the same survey described in McCloskey and Ziliak (1996) on a sample of all 41 papers published in Strategic Management Journal during 2007 that use regression methodology. We use the criteria for good science represented by these survey questions as the foundation for our discussion. We present our arguments for the relevance of each of these criteria in strategy research with examples of best practice and provide a detailed analysis of areas of research practice that can be improved with associated recommendations.

Findings: Our survey suggests that there is indeed cause for concern, since 90% of our surveyed papers make no distinction between statistical and economic/substantive significance of their results. At the same time, many of the surveyed papers make some attempt to interpret their results in a substantively meaningful fashion.

Originality/Value of Paper: Our paper addresses a critical set of issues that influence progress in strategic management research. We provide a roadmap for how we can address these issues for progress in our field.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-159-6

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2009

Abstract

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-159-6

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Abstract

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Abstract

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Ben Kerrane and Margaret K. Hogg

The purpose of this paper is to examine children's consumption experiences within families in order to investigate the role that different family environments play in the…

3897

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine children's consumption experiences within families in order to investigate the role that different family environments play in the consumer socialisation of children.

Design/methodology/approach

Key consumer socialisation literature is reviewed and family communication patterns and parental socialisation style studies are introduced. Such studies argue for the homogenous and shared nature of the family environment for children. A three‐stage qualitative study of six families is reported, incorporating existential phenomenological interviews. The voices of children and their parents are captured, and the transcribed interview texts are analyzed on two levels (within and across family cases) using a hermeneutical process.

Findings

The findings of the study point towards the differential treatment of children within the family environment by both parents and siblings. It is proposed that children inhabit a unique position, or micro‐environment, within their family setting. Consumer micro‐environments are introduced; these have important implications in terms of children's consumption behaviour and, more importantly, their consumer socialisation process within the family setting.

Research limitations/implications

Consumer micro‐environments have potentially important implications in any re‐evaluation of the literature on consumer socialisation, and it is suggested that children may not have equal access to socialisation advice and support offered by family members. A limited number of families and family types are recruited in this exploratory study, and scope exists to explore family micro‐environments across a greater variety of family forms.

Originality/value

A series of micro‐environments, which have implications for the consumer socialisation of children, will be developed on a theoretical level. Existing consumer research views the family environment in homogenous terms, with suggestions that children are socialised by their parents in a similar manner (inhabiting a shared family environment). These findings problematise such a view and also offer insights into the role played by siblings in the consumer socialisation process.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Ji Li, Kevin Lam and Ping Ping Fu

Past research has suggested the influence of family‐oriented collectivistic culture on the behavior and performance of traditional Chinese manufacturing firms. However…

Abstract

Past research has suggested the influence of family‐oriented collectivistic culture on the behavior and performance of traditional Chinese manufacturing firms. However, insufficient empirical research has been conducted to empirically test the influence. More importantly, insufficient research has been conducted to test how the collectivistic culture in Chinese societies would affect the performance of manufacturing firms. This paper addresses these issues by comparing the behaviors and performance of two groups of firms in China, i.e., investment from overseas Chinese firms and investment from non‐Chinese Western firms, in one of China's fast‐growing manufacturing industries. Interesting differences are found between the overseas Chinese firms and those from other foreign countries. The findings support the influence of societal culture on firms' behavior and performance, but do not support the predictions on performance based on the arguments of cultural distance. This paper concludes with a discussion on implications of the findings for both researchers and practitioners.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Kevin Visconti

New York is the third top wine producing state in America. Competitive wine production across the United States has challenged New York winemakers to secure a place in the…

Abstract

Purpose

New York is the third top wine producing state in America. Competitive wine production across the United States has challenged New York winemakers to secure a place in the domestic market in order to support the long-term viability of the local economy. As businesses of agriculture become increasingly disrupted by the changing natural environment and consumer demand for sustainable products grows, vintners may distinguish themselves through the production and promotion of strategic initiatives on wine bottle labels.

Design/methodology/approach

Fueled by the distinct fields of green marketing and environmental communication, this research investigates the promotion of sustainable practices on wine bottle labels. Through the methodology of content analysis, this project examines all 13 wineries on the Shawangunk Wine Trail located in the Hudson River Region of New York.

Findings

The findings from this study show that less than half of wineries in the sample selection employ environmental marketing as a communication strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This research carries practical, business and social implications for the local Hudson River Region, the larger New York wine industry, and any organization looking to remain viable in a competitive marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper reveals the potential for the Hudson River Region wine industry to promote its “distinctive” and “innovative” environmental philosophy of “terroir driven and sustainably produced” winemaking on wine bottle labels to differentiate themselves in a crowded and expanding marketplace and build a Basis of Legitimacy with consumers.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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