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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Kevin C. Desouza and Yukika Awazu

To draw management and scholarly attention to two missing capabilities in a knowledge management program: segmentation capability and destruction capability.

Abstract

Purpose

To draw management and scholarly attention to two missing capabilities in a knowledge management program: segmentation capability and destruction capability.

Design/methodology/approach

An opinion paper based on consulting and research experiences of the authors.

Findings

Organizations that consider the two missing capabilities have witnessed significantly improved knowledge management programs compared with when the capabilities were missing from their agenda. In addition to the two missing capabilities, the third capability – protection capability – may need due attention.

Research limitations/implications

The two missing capabilities can be further investigated as important constructs. The two capabilities complement and augment their peer capabilities (creation, transfer, storing, retrieving and applying). The intricacies of the missing capabilities and the known capabilities need to be further studied.

Practical implications

If an organization neglects the two capabilities, the benefits of their knowledge management program will be limited. Organizations can cultivate the two missing capabilities effectively and efficiently by following the suggestions of the paper.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that discusses the two missing knowledge management capabilities exclusively and connects their role and importance to known capabilities.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Kevin C. Desouza, Ayan Chattaraj and George Kraft

The purpose of the paper is to suggest a novel approach that groups the theories of systems, information and bounded rationality into organizational knowledge management…

Abstract

The purpose of the paper is to suggest a novel approach that groups the theories of systems, information and bounded rationality into organizational knowledge management. We base our discussion on knowledge process mapping akin to the supply chain perspective. This is done to understand the governing principles of knowledge movement within an organizational system, and how the different functions within that system behave and interact among themselves in managing knowledge. We attempt to understand the impact of organizational structure in knowledge transfer and utilization among the different participating functions in the perspective of systems theory. Based on this framework the paper then makes use of information theory to comprehend the ideas behind an effective process of knowledge movement in any organization, and the probable factors that influence such movements. Lastly the concepts of bounded rationality are brought in, to examine the behaviors and interactions of these functions in creating, exploiting and sharing knowledge towards an effective knowledge management system.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2015

Chen Ye, Sanjeev Jha and Kevin C. Desouza

Successful innovation depends upon effective communication of the business value of innovation. Yet different stages of the innovation process require different…

Abstract

Successful innovation depends upon effective communication of the business value of innovation. Yet different stages of the innovation process require different communication strategies. Companies who have recognized the different elements of the innovation process are able to target their communication mechanisms to achieve the best results from organizational innovation. In this article, we employ Desouza’s model of intrapreneurship to outline key communication challenges and strategies for addressing them across the five phases of innovation: idea generation and mobilization, idea screening and advocacy, experimentation with ideas, commercialization of ideas, and diffusion and implementation of ideas. The importance of communication to each stage is identified and barriers are noted. Drawing from first-hand interviews, case studies and a literature review, and further refined by presentation of the ideas to various executives, we propose in this article seven communication strategies for organizations to consider across the innovation process. Overall, having a clear understanding of the stages of the innovation process, and the kinds of communication that are most beneficial to each stage provides a clear vision of how to communicate the business value of innovations both internally and to external stakeholders. The effectiveness of communication can determine the success or failure of an innovation project.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Mark Power, Carlo Bonifazi and Kevin C. Desouza

As businesses struggle to lower cost and grow revenues, outsourcing initiatives are underway in many small, medium, and large global companies. Outsourcing strategies are…

Abstract

As businesses struggle to lower cost and grow revenues, outsourcing initiatives are underway in many small, medium, and large global companies. Outsourcing strategies are considered by many as a “silver bullet” to resolve organizational problems. They have been touted as the “holy grail” to reduce costs, focus on core business processes, improve product and service offerings, and speed up time to market. These benefits are only achieved by organizations that master the art of devising, deploying, and maintaining outsourcing relationships, for many these benefits remain elusive. The following article identifies the ten traps of outsourcing.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Kevin C. Desouza and Yukika Awazu

Managing knowledge is a critical capability for small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to master because it helps them leverage their most critical resource

Abstract

Purpose

Managing knowledge is a critical capability for small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to master because it helps them leverage their most critical resource. Organizational knowledge is the most salient resource at the disposal of SMEs in terms of availability, access, and depth. Successful SMEs are those who can leverage their knowledge in an effective and efficient manner, so as to make up for deficiencies in traditional resources, like land, labor, and capital. The purpose of this article to to discuss five peculiarities about knowledge management practices at SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The article draws findings from a nine‐month investigation of knowledge management practices at 25 SMEs.

Findings

The research discovered that SMEs do not manage knowledge the same way as larger organizations. Viewing SME knowledge management practices as scaled down versions of the practices found in larger organizations is incorrect. SMEs have understandable resource constraints, and hence have to be creative in working around these limitations in order to manage knowledge.

Originality/value

The paper sheds some light on peculiarities in SME knowledge management practices, which will hopefully entice scholars and practitioners to follow‐up with more detailed research undertakings.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Kevin C. Desouza

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a neglected dimension in strategic sourcing – security.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on a neglected dimension in strategic sourcing – security.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes two vignettes which illustrate different kinds of security breaches and discusses securing strategic sourcing efforts.

Findings

The paper points to the need to seriously consider the security dimension in sourcing agreements.

Originality/value

This paper will hopefully raise awareness to the security dimension in the context of strategic sourcing.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Kevin C. Desouza

This paper seeks to discuss the new frontiers of knowledge management research.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the new frontiers of knowledge management research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the author's experiences of putting together a compilation of writings by scholars on the future of knowledge management.

Findings

The paper outlines a research agenda for knowledge management.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on critical problems that need to be examined in order to advance the field of knowledge management. Current scholars and students in the area of knowledge management can gain from the insights presented here.

Details

VINE, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Kevin C. Desouza and Jeffrey J. Raider

Recently, the demise of the dot.com mania, coupled with slow economic growth has caused organizations to cut costs in an attempt to improve efficiency and the bottom line…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the demise of the dot.com mania, coupled with slow economic growth has caused organizations to cut costs in an attempt to improve efficiency and the bottom line. Discontinuing or suspending knowledge management efforts and disbanding the chief knowledge officers' (CKOs) role is one common response from most organizations faced with these cost and efficiency pressures. The purpose of this paper is to describe why firms choose to cut knowledge management efforts and point to the deleterious long‐term effects of this course of action.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on discussions with executives.

Findings

The paper highlights three common reasons why firms choose to cut knowledge management efforts, namely: knowledge management is seen as a luxury, not a necessity; knowledge management is subsumed under information technology methods; and investment in knowledge management does not offer immediate results. Moreover, the paper argues that cutting knowledge management efforts does more harm than good for a corporation in the long run.

Originality/value

The paper describes techniques that CKOs should employ to gain support of their executive peers.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Nicholas D. Sweers and Kevin C. Desouza

The purpose of this case study is to highlight the importance of recognizing and mitigating covert employee resistance to a change management initiative.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to highlight the importance of recognizing and mitigating covert employee resistance to a change management initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

This hypothetical case study takes place at a mid‐sized consulting firm specializing in innovative web development solutions. An underground resistance movement surfaces in the final stages of an organizational restructuring effort, threatening the final implementation phase. The change manager, a young senior partner at the firm, is now faced with the reality that his plan may fail. The psychological underpinnings of the movement, rooted in the natural human tendency to resist change, provide a framework for examining the inherent difficulty of successful change management.

Findings

On realization of the underground resistance movement, the change manager must act quickly to quell employee animosity before his plan is ultimately doomed. Although a solution is not explicitly stated within the context of the case study, responses from two senior executives provide strategic direction based on real‐world experience. Differentiating between management and leadership, as well as understanding the importance of executive involvement in restructuring efforts, highlight the critical points to take away from the case study.

Originality/value

Despite the overwhelming amount of literature available on countering resistance in change management efforts, few studies have examined the impact of covert resistance. Unfortunately, the high rate of failure associated with covert resistance leads to a limited supply of material for learning and analysis. By presenting this phenomenon in a case study format, together with responses from real‐world executives, the hope is that the reader can understand the causes and solutions to underground resistance efforts.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Kevin C. Desouza and Tobin Hensgen

The development of virtual crisis centers for organizations should be established. This study seeks to contend that having such a center will help an organization monitor…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of virtual crisis centers for organizations should be established. This study seeks to contend that having such a center will help an organization monitor the necessary signals generated and dissipated from within and around the organization in order to sense impending crisis. Once detected, the center can be used to evade or in some cases even curtail the effects of the crisis. If signal detection does not work, the center can be used to restore the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual. The discussion of what it takes to build such a crisis center is grounded on past work related to failures in intelligence leading to the disaster of 9/11.

Findings

Virtual crisis centers will become a necessity in face of even more uncertain economic and political times. The benefit of such centers stems from an initiative which reflects preparedness and determination through actions to mitigate and possibly evade some of the consequences related to crisis.

Originality/value

Proposes a design approach to the creation of virtual crisis centers to manage signals of crises.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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