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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Anna Vikström, Anna Billström, Parviz Fazeli, Monica Holm, Kerstin Jonsson, Gunilla Karlsson and Peter Rydström

The purpose of this paper is to describe the collective exploration, process and knowledge production made in a learning study about solution chemistry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the collective exploration, process and knowledge production made in a learning study about solution chemistry.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary school teachers conducted a learning study with variation theory as a guiding principle, supervised by a researcher. The relationship between teaching and learning was analyzed and evaluated in a learning study cycle of three lessons.

Findings

Critical aspects when teaching solution chemistry were identified, as well as enacted patterns of variation that significantly improved students’ learning. Examples of critical aspects were the particulate character of matter, especially the feature of “empty space” between particles, the connection between macroscopic phenomenon and sub‐microscopic explanations and the difference between answers with everyday language and scientific language.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that teachers in a learning study can produce new knowledge as well as use earlier research results when creating teaching activities that can improve their own practical work and students’ learning.

Originality/value

The study represents an example of research with the aim to improve teachers’ practice by generating knowledge in connection with teachers’ professional tasks.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Ulla Eriksson-Zetterquist

The circumstances for the emergence of new ideas in organizational theory have previously been explored from several viewpoints. Researchers trace the origins of new ideas…

Abstract

The circumstances for the emergence of new ideas in organizational theory have previously been explored from several viewpoints. Researchers trace the origins of new ideas to previous literature or compare ideas across continents and countries. The author takes another point of departure. Following Merton (1957, 1963), she focuses on “multiple discoveries” in science, studying the independent, simultaneous (re-)discovery of certain aspects of institutional theory in organizational theory. Specifically, she follows the circumstances under which two pairs of researchers proffered similar explanations for the phenomena they encountered (Jönsson & Lundin, 1977; Meyer & Rowan, 1977). Without ever having met, they suggested an analogous way of understanding the concept of organizing, though their research used different frames of reference and field material and was published in different outlets. The author’s analysis of the circumstances surrounding the two papers led her to explore elements in the emergence of new ideas: the Zeitgeist – the spirit of the times – international networks, and collegial work. When these factors are in play, physical meetings do not seem to be required, but scholars must be involved in networks in which their colleagues provide judgment and advice.

Details

The Production of Managerial Knowledge and Organizational Theory: New Approaches to Writing, Producing and Consuming Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-183-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Rebecka Cowen Forssell

The purpose of this paper is to explore what characterizes cyberbullying when it is performed in digital space and in an increasingly boundary blurred working life context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what characterizes cyberbullying when it is performed in digital space and in an increasingly boundary blurred working life context.

Design/methodology/approach

Cyberbullying is explored through the lens of Erving Goffman’s theories on everyday life interaction and social media scholars understanding of social life on the internet today. The empirical material for the study is grounded in eight in-depth interviews with individuals who have been subjected to cyberbullying behavior in their professional life. The interview data were analyzed by means of thematic analysis.

Findings

Three key themes were identified: spatial interconnectedness, colliding identities and the role of the audience. The empirical data indicate that in order to understand cyberbullying in working life, it is necessary to consider the specific context that emerges with social network sites and blogs. Moreover, this study shows how social network sites tend to blur boundaries between the private and the professional for the targeted individual.

Originality/value

Cyberbullying in working life is a relatively under-researched area. Most existing research on cyberbullying follows the tradition of face-to-face bullying by addressing the phenomenon with quantitative methods. Given the limited potential of this approach to uncover new and unique features, this study makes an important contribution by exploring cyberbullying with a qualitative approach that provides in-depth understanding of the new situations that emerge when bullying is performed online.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Anna Margaretha Malm, Anna Fredriksson and Kerstin Johansen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how capability gaps can be identified and how they can be dealt with in aircraft technology transfers in future offset deals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how capability gaps can be identified and how they can be dealt with in aircraft technology transfers in future offset deals.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on lessons learned as identified from three case studies of technology transfers from Saab, a Swedish aircraft manufacturing company to South Africa, the Czech Republic, and India.

Findings

The capability gap between sender and receiver has to be dealt with on two levels: on an organizational level; and on an individual level. It is proposed that the disseminative capacity constitutes the ability to assess the capability gap between the sender and receiver, and to convert this assessment to adaptations of the product and production process to include in an industrialization process. On the individual level, the capability-raising activities were connected to employees’ knowledge, personal development plans for the transfer of explicit knowledge, as well as on-the-job training to facilitate the exchange of tacit knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on case studies from one company. Therefore, it is necessary to confirm the proposed propositions through new case studies in other contexts as well as through survey-based research.

Originality/value

The paper focusses on the context of offset and reports on actual experiences from a capability perspective of technology transfers within the aircraft manufacturing area. It proposes a structured way of identifying and bridging the capability gap within such transfers.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Krushna Mahapatra, Leif Gustavsson and Kerstin Hemström

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of regulations, perceptions, and promotions on the emergence of an innovation system for wood‐framed multi‐storey…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of regulations, perceptions, and promotions on the emergence of an innovation system for wood‐framed multi‐storey buildings in Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom (UK).

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive paper made a qualitative analysis of information collected mainly from secondary sources such as reports, newspapers, journal publications, conference proceedings and general internet search.

Findings

Results showed that the conditions for market growth of multi‐storey construction seemed to be the most favourable in Sweden followed by the UK and Germany. The regulations are stringent in Germany, followed by the UK and Sweden. In all countries, the construction professionals seemed to have negative perceptions regarding engineering properties of wood. Similar negative perceptions exist among the general public in Germany and the UK, but not in Sweden. The wood construction promotional activities in Germany and the UK are directed to all types of houses, while in Sweden multi‐storey buildings are targeted.

Research limitations/implications

An important implication of this paper was that it highlighted the usefulness of cross‐country surveys at the European level, in order to better understand observed differences in the adoption of innovative systems. However, there might be shortcomings in the comparability of the information across the countries analysed because it was difficult to make an objective assessment of the claims made in some of the information sources. Also, there was varying and limited information about the survey methodologies used in some of the reviewed studies.

Practical implications

The study showed that market intervention is needed to promote radical or really new innovations such as wood construction. The variations in the promotional measures undertaken partly explained the variations in growth of wood construction system in the three countries.

Originality/value

The paper applied a theoretical framework on technology transition to analyse emergence of wood construction system in Germany, Sweden and the UK. The framework can be applied to analyse the development of wood construction system in other countries also.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Juuso Toyli, Harri Lorentz and Lauri Ojala

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Kerstin Nilsson and Mette Sandoff

The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers’ experiences of leading…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers’ experiences of leading processes involving patient care and treatment when working in a hierarchical health-care organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an explorative design. The data were gathered from interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals. These data underwent qualitative and interpretative analysis with a modified editing style.

Findings

The process managers’ experiences of leading processes in a hierarchical health-care organization are described under three themes: having or not having a mandate, exposure to conflict situations and leading process development. The results indicate a need for clarity regarding process manager’s responsibility and work content, which need to be communicated to all managers and staff involved in the patient care and treatment process, irrespective of department. There also needs to be an emphasis on realistic expectations and orientation of the goals that are an intrinsic part of the task of being a process manager.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizations from the results of the qualitative interview studies are limited, but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which, in turn, can be transferred to similar settings.

Originality/value

This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leading care and treatment processes in a functional, hierarchical health-care organization from process managers’ experiences, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Hussan Saed Al-Chalabi

The purpose of this paper is to develop a practical economic replacement decision model to identify the economic lifetime of the ventilation system used by Trafikverket in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a practical economic replacement decision model to identify the economic lifetime of the ventilation system used by Trafikverket in its Stockholm tunnels.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed data-driven optimisation model considers operating and maintenance costs, purchase price and system resale value for a ventilation system consisting of 121 fans. The study identified data quality problems in Trafikverket’s MAXIMO database.

Findings

It is found that the absolute economic replacement time (ERT) of the ventilation system is 108 months but for a range of 100–120 months, the total cost remains almost constant. Sensitivity and regression analysis showed that the operating cost has the largest impact on the ERT.

Originality/value

The results are promising; the company has the possibility of significantly reducing the LCC of the ventilation system by optimising its lifetime. In addition, the proposed model can be used for other systems with repairable components, making it applicable, useful and implementable within Trafikverket more generally.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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