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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

John Billingsley and Kerry Withers

Collaboration between a mechatronics engineer and a biologist resulted in an unlikely application of machine vision. To deduce the density of the porous teeth, the volume…

Abstract

Collaboration between a mechatronics engineer and a biologist resulted in an unlikely application of machine vision. To deduce the density of the porous teeth, the volume had to be found. An expedient method was constructed for scanning the teeth before they had to be returned to their source and a simple method was derived for deducing their volume.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2011

Kerry Sheldon and Allison Tennant

This paper provides a clinical practice overview of the challenges that can arise when working with dangerous and severe personality‐disordered patients in a high secure…

Abstract

This paper provides a clinical practice overview of the challenges that can arise when working with dangerous and severe personality‐disordered patients in a high secure hospital. Poor engagement and treatment readiness, mistrust, paranoia and dominant interpersonal styles are all clinical features that affect treatment delivery. The paper discusses the impact of these features, and suggests how clinicians can engage effectively with individuals who have personality disorders in regard to therapy in general.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Peter L. Francia

Popular accounts of the labor movement suggest that unions have become weak organizations. There are, however, trends that indicate laborʼs political power has not waned…

Abstract

Popular accounts of the labor movement suggest that unions have become weak organizations. There are, however, trends that indicate laborʼs political power has not waned in recent years. Using data from multiple sources, the results in this study indicate: (1) despite declines in union density, the percentage of union households has remained steady for two decades; (2) unions continue to produce a strong Democratic vote from its membership, even from its white male members; (3) unions are among the top campaign contributors and spenders in American elections; (4) unions hold significant influence among congressional Democrats and have made gains at the state and local level; and (5) public opinion of labor unions has remained consistently positive for several decades.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Olfa Karoui

In Canada, food insecurity is characterized by the consumption of low quantity or low-quality foods, worrying about food supply and/or acquiring foods in socially…

Abstract

In Canada, food insecurity is characterized by the consumption of low quantity or low-quality foods, worrying about food supply and/or acquiring foods in socially unacceptable ways, such as begging or scavenging. As of 2012, approximately 15.2% of Ontario, Canada, children are living in food insecure households, a prevalence which has remained steady since 2005. This is particularly concerning when considering that school-aged children are a population whose growth and developing is sensitive to nutritional stress, and the experience of childhood food insecurity is highly associated with the development of adverse physical, mental and learning outcomes. This study aims at establishing the relationship between food insecurity and Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) standardized test scores in order to highlight the incompatibility of the EQAO's reliance on test outcomes in determining Ontarian school's accountability, specifically for those with a high prevalence of food insecurity.

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Kerry Raymond Bolton

The aim of this paper is to show that there are workable alternatives to the debt‐finance system in the form of “state credit.”

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to show that there are workable alternatives to the debt‐finance system in the form of “state credit.”

Design/methodology/approach

The example used for the practical application of “state credit” is the State Housing programme of the 1935 New Zealand Labour Government. The primary sources are mainly the pamphlets of John A. Lee, responsible for the State Housing and Labour finance policies.

Findings

The paper shows that “state credit” was used on a large‐scale for constructive purposes, which not only provided debt‐free funding for an enduring construction programme, but one that did so without accompanying inflation or other adverse consequences which are warned of by orthodox economists.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on a single example of the use of state credit, albeit an important and large‐scale one.

Practical implications

State credit was used in a major way during the 1930s to overcome unemployment while constructing something lasting and of enduring social benefit. It is a method that can be reapplied in the present time at a period where debt is reaching crisis point from entire nations down to families and individual consumers; with the most common remedy suggested relief being “austerity” and welfare cuts.

Social implications

State credit is a means of achieving large‐scale public works, while reducing unemployment, and reducing taxes, rates and prices which generally incorporate into costs the servicing of debts. The social implications are wide‐ranging.

Originality/value

The 1935 State Housing programme had endured as part of an iconic New Zealand social experiment, but one of which the method of funding is now virtually unknown.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1937

So far as the London activities of librarianship are concerned, the Winter opened propitiously when Mr. J. D. Stewart and Mr. J. Wilks addressed a goodly audience at…

Abstract

So far as the London activities of librarianship are concerned, the Winter opened propitiously when Mr. J. D. Stewart and Mr. J. Wilks addressed a goodly audience at Chaucer House, Mr. Stewart on American, and Mr. Wilks on German libraries. There was a live air about the meeting which augured well for the session. The chief librarians of London were well represented, and we hope that they will continue the good work. It was the last meeting over which Mr. George R. Bolton presided as Chairman of the London and Home Counties Branch, and he is succeeded by Mr. Wilks. Mr. Bolton has carried his office with thorough and forceful competence, and London library workers have every reason to be grateful. The election to chairmanship of the librarian of University College, London, gives the Branch for the first time a non‐municipal librarian to preside. The change has not been premature, and, apart from that question, Mr. Wilks is cultured, modest and eloquent and will do honour to his position.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Kerry D. Vandell

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of recent events, it identifies an emerging unification of thought and application that has important implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies and synthesizes the contributory literature to the philosophical underpinnings of value theory and practice as applied to real estate. From pre‐history to the present, it traces classical concepts and the way these are related to the recent innovations in economic and financial valuation theory.

Findings

Recent contributions to value theory hold the promise of unifying and transforming the practice of real estate appraisal to one that is state‐of‐the‐art in terms of its contemporary relevance. However, numerous issues remain as obstacles, including insufficient recognition of the “real” nature (as opposed to “capital” nature) of real estate; a lag in educational standards to bring the profession up to date; an excessive reliance on models and data rather than judgment and common sense; and “silo‐ization” of specialties. Promising directions for future research are identified.

Originality/value

The task of valuation of interests in real property has taken on an increasingly important role, as the market for real estate has grown and become more liquid and complete. This paper provides a perspective on where it has come from and where it must go in the future in terms necessary changes in theory and practice to remain viable and relevant.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Lee D. Parker and James Guthrie

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the business school now and in the future.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the business school now and in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an editorial review and argument.

Findings

The paper acknowledges the impact of globalization and “marketization” on business schools.

Research limitations/implications

The editorial offers scope for accounting academics to engage with the university and protect against business school corporatization and/or privatization. This is an important issue in higher education, not only in Australia, but internationally.

Originality/value

The paper provides important empirical data and research information to scholars in the interdisciplinary accounting field of research about the future for business schools.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2007

Alan Barcan

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so…

Abstract

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so years which preceded it are often passed over as simply a precursor, the incubation of a subsequent explosion; they deserve a higher status. The concentration of interest on the late 1960s and early 1970s arises from the driving role of students in the cultural revolution whose traumatic impact still echoes with us. As late as 2005 some commentators saw federal legislation introducing Voluntary Student Unionism as the culmination of struggles in the 1970s when Deputy Prime Minister Costello and Health Minister Abbott battled their radical enemies. Interest in these turbulent years at a popular, non‐academic level has produced a succession of nostalgic reminiscences. In the Sydney Morning Herald’s ‘Good Weekend’ for 13 December 2003 Mark Dapin pondered whether the Melbourne Maoists had changed their world views (‘Living by the Little Red book’.) In the Sydney University Gazette of October 1995 Andrew West asserted that the campus radicals of the 1960s and ‘70s had remained true to their basic beliefs (‘Not finished fighting’.) Some years later, in April 2003, the editor of that journal invited me to discuss ‘Where have all the rebels gone?’ My answer treated this as a twofold question: What has happened to the former rebels? Why have the students of today abandoned radicalism?

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

William J. Martin

Work undertaken as part of a research project funded under theEuropean STAR Programme is examined. In the course of a major project onValue Added and Data Services (VADS…

Abstract

Work undertaken as part of a research project funded under the European STAR Programme is examined. In the course of a major project on Value Added and Data Services (VADS) in the North of Ireland, an extensive study was conducted of similar developments in the Irish Republic. Some of the more important results of this secondary study are used here to assess the likely implications of enhanced infrastructure provision for the demand for advanced telecommunications services.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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