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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Kerry McGannon

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were interrogated as cultural sites of analysis to accomplish this aim.

Approach

A critical social constructionist perspective on disordered eating is outlined along with narrative research findings on female athletes and disordered eating. A discursive psychological approach and critical discourse analysis (CDA) is then discussed to theorize and study meanings of disordered eating and athlete identities/subject positions. Next, the utility of studying two elite female athlete’s autobiographies is outlined followed by examples from a CDA of two athlete stories.

Findings

Two discourses and two identity/subject positions within each are outlined: discourse of performance and the “committed, controlled athlete” and a discourse of personal growth and the “empowered athlete in transition.” The features of each discourse and subject position are outlined and examples from each athlete’s story. The intention is to show the ways in which discursive resources construct the body, food and identities in sport and the implications.

Implications

The chapter is concluded with why studying “disordered eating and body talk” within discourses is useful to expand understanding of constraining and emancipative aspects of athlete identities, struggle and recovery.

Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Kerry R. McGannon, Sydney Graper and Jenny McMahon

To explore the digital landscape, narrowing to Instagram, as a cultural space to advance sociological understanding of elite athlete mother identity meanings and lives.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the digital landscape, narrowing to Instagram, as a cultural space to advance sociological understanding of elite athlete mother identity meanings and lives.

Design/methodology/approach

Relativist narrative inquiry is outlined as a theoretical and methodological approach to expand sociological research on motherhood and sport, by exploring big and small stories on social media sites. Elite athlete mother's mediated self-portrayals on Instagram are theorized as identity stories (re)created and made possible, by cultural narrative resources.

Findings

An example of big and small story research is outlined from a larger case study of elite athlete figure skating mothers' self-portrayals on Instagram as they negotiated motherhood, and a professional sport career. Thematic narrative analysis findings include a big story plot in the post-partum period: negotiating intensive mothering and career. Two small stories that fed into fluid meanings of this big story plot are also presented: holding the baby close and working mum/new mumtrepeneur. These findings show nuanced contradictions of contemporary motherhood meanings, within sportswomen's personal and public digital stories.

Originality/value

A big and small story approach grounded in narrative inquiry holds value to learn more about the contemporary digital landscape's shaping of the meanings of sportswomen's identities and lives. Future research is recommended using this approach on additional social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) to expand intertextual understanding of elite athlete mother identities in socio-cultural context, tapping into these underexplored naturalistic data resources.

Details

Sport, Social Media, and Digital Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-684-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Robert J. Schinke, Kerry R. McGannon, Jack Watson and Rebecca Busanich

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the authors own assumptions made as academics using two examples from a research project with an Aboriginal community…

1904

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the authors own assumptions made as academics using two examples from a research project with an Aboriginal community. The first attempt features a project that silenced the community. Later work engaged the community through tenets of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and a sport development project (SDP).

Design/methodology/approach

This project explores a shift from a mainstream qualitative approach steeped in post-positivism to a de-colonizing methodology which opened up a space for a SDP.

Findings

Mainstream research methodologies tend to silence marginalized communities and overlook local cultural practices. Effective community programming requires extensive consultation, and an approach that centralizes local voices.

Research limitations/implications

Current understandings are limited to one Aboriginal Reserve.

Practical implications

Recommendations are proposed concerning how researchers might embark on practices that support the reversal of colonization and improve relations among people from two cultures previously in conflict. SDP initiatives and applied sport research grounded in CBPR are proposed as conduits to bettering relations among cultures in conflict.

Originality/value

The reader is provided with an example of how to attain goals of SDP at the local level through cultural praxis and a CBPR methodology.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Jimmy Sanderson

Abstract

Details

Sport, Social Media, and Digital Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-684-1

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Dennis Raphael, Susan Anstice, Kim Raine, Kerry R. McGannon, Syed Kamil Rizvi and Vanessa Yu

This paper discusses the role played by social determinants of health in the incidence and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes) among vulnerable populations…

4243

Abstract

This paper discusses the role played by social determinants of health in the incidence and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes) among vulnerable populations. This issue is especially important in light of recent data from Statistics Canada indicating that mortality rates from diabetes have been increasing among Canadians since the mid‐1980s, with increases being especially great among those living in low‐income communities. Diabetes therefore appears – like cardiovascular disease – to be an affliction more common among the poor and excluded. It also appears to be especially likely to afflict poor women. Yet we know little about how these social determinants of health influence diabetes incidence and management. What evidence is available is provided and the case is made that the crisis in diabetes requires new ways of thinking about this disease, its causes, and its management.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Abstract

Details

The Suffering Body in Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-069-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Abstract

Details

Sport, Social Media, and Digital Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-684-1

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