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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Erica Southgate and Kerri Shying

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relatively hidden phenomenon of researchers who not only study dirty work but who also occupy the position of dirty workers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relatively hidden phenomenon of researchers who not only study dirty work but who also occupy the position of dirty workers. Drawing on the sociological debate on insider-outsider categories in research, this paper describes how these types of “dirty work/er researchers” understand and negotiate their occupational subjectivity and the methodological and epistemological resources they bring to their research practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Two biographical narratives from different types of “dirty work/er researchers” are analysed using a feminist epistemology of corporeality, social difference and power.

Findings

Ambivalence is an underlying dynamic of the narratives which indicate that the stigma attached to certain types of dirty work histories act to both facilitate and constrain research practice. Ambivalence disrupts strict binary categories often relied on in research such as insiders and outsiders, empowered and powerless and researcher and Other.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences of “dirty work/er researchers” indicate a need to reconsider ethical, methodological, epistemological issues within social research.

Practical implications

Participatory research frameworks such as peer research should pay closer attention to issues of professional status, power and risk. Further research is required on what happens after peer researchers leave the field.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge of the relatively hidden world of the “dirty work/er researcher”, their occupational experiences and the methodological and epistemological resources they bring to their job.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Corine de Ruiter

Mental health evaluation in criminal cases is a complex and challenging task. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the value of semi‐structured interviews for…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health evaluation in criminal cases is a complex and challenging task. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the value of semi‐structured interviews for diagnosis, the use of literature review to increase understanding of a case, and the importance of looking “beyond” the criminal offence itself.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted a forensic mental health assessment of a man who killed his wife and two young daughters. The case is presented in the order in which information reached the psychologist, so her clinical reasoning becomes apparent. Findings from the police file are integrated with psychological test results and a literature review on familicide and uxoricide.

Findings

The case analysis illustrates the perpetrator fits a personality profile found in empirical research on male spousal killers, who often suffer from dependent, avoidant and over‐controlled personality pathology. Four mental health experts who previously reported on this case had not agreed on a diagnosis. Using a more structured approach to assessment, the current analysis sheds new light on the relationship between mental disorder and offence.

Practical implications

The use of semi‐structured interviews for psychiatric diagnosis increases diagnostic reliability. Since there is so much at stake for the assessed in a criminal investigation, the importance of reliability and accuracy of diagnosis cannot be overestimated. Forensic mental health experts serve the court best by integrating findings from structured assessment instruments, file information and empirical research on comparable offender types.

Originality/value

This paper can be useful for teaching purposes and provides guidance to both novice and experienced forensic experts.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Valerie Kinloch and Kerry Dixon

This paper aims to examine the cultivation of anti-racist practices with pre- and in-service teachers in post-secondary contexts, and the tensions of engaging in this work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the cultivation of anti-racist practices with pre- and in-service teachers in post-secondary contexts, and the tensions of engaging in this work for equity and justice in urban teacher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on critical race theory (CRT) and critical whiteness studies (CWS), as well as auto-ethnographic and storytelling methods to examine how black in-service teachers working with a black teacher educator and white pre-service teachers working with a white teacher educator enacted strategies for cultivating anti-racist practices.

Findings

Findings indicate that for black and white educators alike, developing critical consciousness and anti-racist pedagogical practices requires naming racism as the central construct of oppression. Moreover, teachers and teacher educators demonstrated the importance of explicitly naming racism and centralizing (rather than de-centralizing) the political project of anti-racism within the current socio-political climate.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to racism, educators’ racialized identities must be centralized to support individual anti-racist pedagogical practices. Storying racism provides a context for this individualized work and provides a framework for disrupting master narratives embedded in educational institutions.

Originality/value

Much has been written about the importance of teachers connecting to students’ out-of-school lives to increase academic achievement and advance educational justice. Strategies for forging those connections include using assets-based practices and linking school curricula to students’ community and cultural identities. While these connections are important, this paper focuses on teachers’ explicit anti-racist practices in urban education.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2013

Dominiek D. Coates

The current chapter outlines the process through which New Religious Movement (NRM) membership is conceptualized as facilitating the development of increased reflexivity…

Abstract

The current chapter outlines the process through which New Religious Movement (NRM) membership is conceptualized as facilitating the development of increased reflexivity, in particular the development of an increased ability to connect to others. Based on the narratives of a subsample of 11 former members of NRMs for whom membership signified a desire for an increased ability to emotionally connect to others, a number of factors that are understood as having facilitated or inhibited this type of change were identified and are discussed. The findings extend previous theorizing of NRM as facilitating changes in the behaviors and beliefs of their members, and conceptualizes NRMs as possible avenues through which self-change at an emotional level can occur.

Details

40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Suzanne Bates

Effective communication through public speaking is an essential skill for executives, and this article explains how to avoid the top eight mistakes that people make when…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective communication through public speaking is an essential skill for executives, and this article explains how to avoid the top eight mistakes that people make when in the spotlight.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the author's experience as an executive coach and former television news anchor, the article uses real‐life examples to illustrate the mis‐steps CEOs and other leaders have made in their public communications, and offers practical tips for how to avoid repeating these eight common mistakes.

Findings

The article presents practical ways to avoid eight common and preventable errors that leaders are apt to make in public speaking situations.

Practical implications

In addition to having business or technical skills, CEOs and other leaders must become masterful and effective communicators. This article explains how to avoid common errors in public speaking, and how to identify the lesson in every mistake. Effective communicators don't have to be perfect, but they must be prepared.

Originality/value

The article's value lies in its clear and practical tips that will help leaders handle the public speaking spotlight with confidence and success.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Qi (Kerry) Wu

Discusses the application of win‐win mindsets and strategy in the employment of reference graduate assistants in academic libraries. The strategy covers different stages…

Abstract

Discusses the application of win‐win mindsets and strategy in the employment of reference graduate assistants in academic libraries. The strategy covers different stages of the employment including recruitment, training and support, and transition. It focuses on the concept of treating graduate assistants as colleagues and involving them in the whole process. Also compares the differences between the employment of reference graduate assistants who are library school students and those who are non‐library school students, and the differences between graduate assistants in libraries and contingency workers in the business world.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1971

John O'Riordan

‘WHY MUST EVERYBODY IN IRELAND’, says Sean O'Faolain, in one of his recent flashes of inspiration, ‘live like an express train that starts off for heaven full of beautiful…

Abstract

‘WHY MUST EVERYBODY IN IRELAND’, says Sean O'Faolain, in one of his recent flashes of inspiration, ‘live like an express train that starts off for heaven full of beautiful dreams, and marvellous ambitions and, halfway, Bejasus, you switch off the bloody track down some sideline that brings you to exactly where you began?’ Such highly coloured comment might equally well be applied to the characters and situations we find in the plays of that Dublin genius—the centenary of whose birth we are commemorating this year—John Millington Synge. The writings of both authors, incidentally, are characterized by a rueful, amusing, gently self‐mocking tone about Ireland and the Irish. Both adopt a wider, detached, almost continental view of their country. Synge, in particular, refers to Ireland as the furthermost corner of Western Europe and himself as an Irish European.

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Kerry Bunker, Art Gechman and Jim Rush

Volatility and uncertainty are earmarks of the environment facing leaders and organizations today. This article seeks to assert that new mindsets and capabilities are…

Abstract

Purpose

Volatility and uncertainty are earmarks of the environment facing leaders and organizations today. This article seeks to assert that new mindsets and capabilities are required for leaders to capitalize on the risks and opportunities confronting them. The authors aim to provide a reminder that a leader's experience presents the greatest source of developmental opportunity, but that this is largely an untapped resource. To leverage this resource, a disciplined, deliberate and systematic process for learning from experience is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on years of experience in developing leaders and seminal research on learning from experience, the authors argue for a complete reframing of the way people think of leadership and develop leaders rather than continuing to make the existing approach somewhat better.

Findings

This article lays out four pivotal capabilities (vigilance, pattern recognition, mental rehearsal, and response readiness) leaders must use to be effective in this new environment and a three‐stage process for doing so. The tools used in each stage are discussed and examples provided.

Originality/value

This paper shows organizations how to ready leaders for a world that has changed. It makes practical a well‐understood adage in leader development (namely that experience is the greatest source for development by far) but one most leaders and organizations have failed to leverage effectively.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2009

Jeffery P. Dennis

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to trace the history of the cultural myth that children, especially boys, experience an abrupt heterosexual awakening during…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to trace the history of the cultural myth that children, especially boys, experience an abrupt heterosexual awakening during pubescence, from its origin during the 1950s to the present, with particular attention to a decrease in the age posited for such an awakening, from fourteen or fifteen to eight or nine or even earlier, until finally children are presented as heterosexually desiring from birth.

Methodology – The methodology is a content analysis of a sample of mass media texts starring or featuring prepubescent or pubescent boys, including films, television programs, comic books, comic strips, and juvenile novels, appearing in the United States between 1950 and 2007.

Findings – The rapid decrease in the age is correlated with an increased visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents, leading to the conclusion that it results from an attempt to privilege heterosexuality by making it appear a natural, inevitable outcome of biological maturation that is absent until puberty, whereas at the same time addressing homophobic insistence that no juvenile character be presented as gay by ensuring all characters, regardless of age, express heterosexual desire.

Research limitations/implications – The study is limited to a single causal factor, but it illustrates a complex cultural phenomenon, a shift in the way childhood is constructed, so there are doubtless other factors that should be explored. It is also necessary to explore why the change from presumed pubescent heterosexual awakening to presumed constitutional heterosexuality occurred at different rates depending on the race and social class of the character and the medium presented.

Details

Perceiving Gender Locally, Globally, and Intersectionally
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-753-6

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