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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Arthur L. Rutledge, Kenneth R. Tillery, Bryan Kethley and Kiran J. Desai

In the decade since Tillery, Rutledge and Inman reviewed the treatment of quality management in leading US production and operations management (P/OM) textbooks, attention…

Abstract

In the decade since Tillery, Rutledge and Inman reviewed the treatment of quality management in leading US production and operations management (P/OM) textbooks, attention to quality, once the watchword and driving force in world business, has faded in both the practitioner and popular press. The ultimate purpose of the present research was to establish the progress, current status, and relevancy of the treatment of quality in current US P/OM textbooks, which remain the principal source of quality information in the undergraduate P/OM core course, preparing most future US managers as well as many international managers of tomorrow. Results of the present study indicate that over the last decade US P/OM textbooks have begun to reflect a more proactive and less reactive approach to quality management. However, results also indicate that current US P/OM textbooks lack relevancy of their quality content to practitioner needs, treat TQM and other holistic approaches to quality management superficially, and have little consistency concerning quality emphases.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Kenneth R. Tillery, Arthur L. Rutledge and R. Anthony Inman

A continuous reorientation towards quality by US firms should be facilitated by the infusion of business and engineering school graduates having a solid conceptual…

Abstract

A continuous reorientation towards quality by US firms should be facilitated by the infusion of business and engineering school graduates having a solid conceptual foundation of quality and quality management. Examines a sample of the textbooks used in the standard under‐graduate course in production and operations management to assess the coverage and orientation provided towards quality and quality management. While the traditional quality model is still dominant, expanded coverage providing a more balanced view of the operational and strategic faces of quality is seen.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Kenneth R. Tillery and Arthur L. Rutledge

Quality will continue to be an issue to the business community in the 1990s. Firms facing the changing demands from their customer groups as well as from their competitors…

Abstract

Quality will continue to be an issue to the business community in the 1990s. Firms facing the changing demands from their customer groups as well as from their competitors must come to terms as to what “quality” means to there overall business in order to achieve it through their strategies and operating systems. This article looks at two basic areas of this quality concern: the quality‐strategy connection and the quality‐management connection. Each firm′s approach to quality should be unique. The dilemma is matching the firm′s competences and abilities with its customers′ needs within its competitive market. This dilemma can be overcome by providing equal attention to design quality and conformance quality to ensure the strongest link possible between quality and strategy. Then use the Quality‐Management connection to develop a strong customer orientation, integrate quality goals and facilitating mechanisms throughout the process, and focus on prevention of non‐conformance.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Kenneth R. Tillery, Blagoja Lazarevski and Roberto Luna‐Arocas

This study examines the love of money and work‐related attitudes and identifies four money profiles based on a sample of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. Achieving…

Abstract

This study examines the love of money and work‐related attitudes and identifies four money profiles based on a sample of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. Achieving Money Worshipers (the highest scores on Factors Success, Motivator, and Budget and the lowest on Evil) had the highest active involvement in work activities. Careless Money Admirers (the lowest score on Factor Budget) had the highest external locus of control, the highest involvement, and lowest success avoidance. Apathetic Money Managers (the lowest scores on Factors Success and Motivator) had the highest internal locus of control and the lowest involvement. Money Repellent Individuals (the highest score on Factor Evil) had the lowest competitiveness and the highest success avoidance. Results provide the validity of the Love of Money Scale and the four money profiles.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1952

The work of Dr. Hassall on behalf of The Lancet, briefly summarised in a previous essay, received great publicity in the lay Press between 1852 and 1855. The Times and The

Abstract

The work of Dr. Hassall on behalf of The Lancet, briefly summarised in a previous essay, received great publicity in the lay Press between 1852 and 1855. The Times and The Quarterly Review gave the subject special prominence. The last named journal, in a review of Dr. Hassall's book in 1855, said: “The precision with which he is enabled to state the result of his labours leaves no appeal… We have now shown enough to convince the public that the grossest fraud reigns throughout the British public commissariat. It remains to be seen whether the Government is able and willing to stay this gigantic evil and national dishonour.” In fact, in the same year, a House of Commons Committee sat to take evidence and reported to the effect that adulteration was widely prevalent, the public health endangered, fraud committed on the whole community, public morality tainted and the high commercial character of the country seriously lowered. Nevertheless, five years were allowed to lapse before the first adulteration Act reached the statute‐book in 1860. This was a weak and inefficient measure and was found to be useless. Very few prosecutions, if any, were instituted. Twelve years later, in 1872, an amending Act was passed. The High Court decided that this Act required sellers of food to know whether what they sold was pure or adulterated. Many traders were convicted, with the result that manufacturers and shopkeepers agitated and obtained the appointment of yet another Parliamentary Committee—on whose advice the Sale of Food and Drugs Act, 1875, was passed. This Act, which had the exceptionally long life of more than fifty years, contained many protective provisions for dealers in food, which, although to some extent no more than fair, did operate in such a way as to limit severely the efforts of local authorities to protect the public. One of the recommendations made in The Lancet has never yet been adopted by Parliament in relation to the sale of adulterated food—namely, that the names and addresses of all vendors of samples found unsatisfactory should be systematically published. Another recommendation was not adopted until the first Labelling of Food Order was made seventy years later, in 1944, requiring the disclosure on many packed foods of their composition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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