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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Kenneth Wilburn Green, Lisa C. Toms and James Clark

This study aims to assess the impact of an established market orientation on the implementation of green supply chain practices and environmental performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the impact of an established market orientation on the implementation of green supply chain practices and environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 225 manufacturing managers are analyzed using a partial least squares structural equation modeling methodology.

Findings

Findings indicate that market orientation both directly and indirectly (through green supply chain management practices) impacts environmental performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on the impact of a market orientation on environmental sustainability within the manufacturing sector, thereby limiting generalization to other sectors.

Practical implications

Manufacturing practitioners are provided with information emphasizing the importance of implementing and maintaining a strong market orientation as a precursor to establishing an environmental sustainability strategy.

Social implications

The results have important societal implications, in that a marketing approach that leads to the more rapid adoption of environmental sustainability programs within the manufacturing sector is identified.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first empirical investigation of the relationship between market orientation and environmental sustainability.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Kenneth W. Green, R. Anthony Inman, Victor E. Sower and Pamela J. Zelbst

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices on environmental performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices on environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a sample of 225 US manufacturing managers are analyzed using a PLS-SEM methodology.

Findings

JIT and TQM are directly and positively associated with green supply chain management practices. JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices are complementary in that combined they provide a greater impact on environmental performance than if implemented individually.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to US manufacturing managers, with a low response rate.

Practical implications

Successful implementations of JIT and TQM improvement programs support the implementation of green supply chain management practices leading to improved environmental performance.

Social implications

The combination of JIT, TQM and green manufacturing practices improves the environment by eliminating all forms of waste and providing customers with eco-friendly products and services.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices within the context of environmental sustainability.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Kenneth W. Green, R. Anthony Inman, Victor E. Sower and Pamela J. Zelbst

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically assess a comprehensive operations and supply chain management (SCM) model. The theorized model incorporates supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically assess a comprehensive operations and supply chain management (SCM) model. The theorized model incorporates supply chain market orientation, Just-in-Time (JIT) and Total Quality Management (TQM) as antecedents and agile production (AP) and green SCM (GSCM) practices as consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a sample of 136 US manufacturing managers were collected via an on-line survey firm. A partial least squares structural equation modeling is used to assess the efficacy of the theorized model.

Findings

Generally, market orientation supports the implementation of JIT and TQM, JIT and TQM support implementation of SCM, SCM supports implementation of AP and green supply chain management practices (GSCMP) and AP and GSCMP positively impact organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The model tested reflects the synergy created though the implementation of management improvement programs that support the six strategic imperatives of customer focus, efficiency, effectiveness, integration with supply chain partners, responsiveness, and environmental sustainability and the effects of those programs on the marketing and financial performance of manufacturing organizations.

Practical implications

The theorized model and results provide practicing managers with a blueprint for the systematic implementation of the improvement programs.

Originality/value

A comprehensive operations and SCM model is proposed and empirically assessed. The results of this investigation support the proposition that market orientation, JIT, TQM, SCM, AP and GSCMPs combine to positively affect organizational performance. The central role of the SCM construct is emphasized.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Laura M. Birou, Kenneth W. Green and R. Anthony Inman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of sustainability training and knowledge on sustainable supply chain practices (SSCP) and the resulting impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of sustainability training and knowledge on sustainable supply chain practices (SSCP) and the resulting impact on sustainable supply chain outcomes (SSCO) and firm performance. It also provides a valid and reliable measure of SSCO.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 129 manufacturing managers are analyzed using a partial least squares structural equation modeling methodology. Manufacturing managers provide data reflecting the degree to which their organizations improved sustainability training and knowledge, utilize SSCP, the degree to which SSCO result, and the subsequent operational performance (OPP) and environmental economic performance (EEP).

Findings

Organizational sustainability training and knowledge positively impacts SSCP, and the utilization of SSCP results in SSCO which favorably impact OPP and EEP.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to manufacturing organizations.

Practical implications

Practitioners are encouraged to improve organizational learning and training and are provided with a valid and reliable scale for measuring the outcomes of their sustainable practices. Combined with the work of others, this provides a framework for evaluating different aspects of sustainability with a firm.

Social implications

Improved green manufacturing practices improves the environment by eliminating all forms of waste and provides eco-friendly products and services.

Originality/value

A sustainable supply chain training and knowledge model is proposed and empirically assessed. The results of this investigation support the proposition that sustainability training and knowledge support the implementation of sustainability supply chain practices which, in turn, improve sustainability outcomes and operational and EEP.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Christie Hough, Cameron Sumlin and Kenneth Wilburn Green

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the combined impact of the ethical environment, organizational trust and workplace optimism on individual performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the combined impact of the ethical environment, organizational trust and workplace optimism on individual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural model is theorized and data from 250 individuals working for private organizations were analyzed using partial-least-squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Both the ethical environment and organizational trust positively impact workplace optimism. Of the ethical environment, organizational trust and workplace optimism, only workplace optimism directly impacts individual performance. The impact of the ethical environment and organizational trust on individual performance is indirect through workplace optimism.

Research limitations/implications

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study to assess the combined impact of the ethical environment, organizational trust and workplace optimism on individual performance. It is important to conduct similar studies to verify these findings.

Practical implications

An ethical environment and organizational trust foster high levels of workplace optimism that in turn lead to improved employee performance.

Originality/value

The important role that workplace optimism plays within the ethical climate of organizations is theorized and assessed. This is the first empirical assessment of the mediational role of workplace optimism on the established relationships between ethical environment and individual performance, and organizational trust and individual performance.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Pamela J. Zelbst, Kenneth W. Green, Victor E. Sower and Philip L. Bond

The purpose of this paper is to assess the combined impact of radio frequency identification (RFID), Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and Blockchain technologies on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the combined impact of radio frequency identification (RFID), Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and Blockchain technologies on supply chain transparency (SCT).

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 211 US manufacturing managers is analyzed using a covariance-based structural equation modeling methodology.

Findings

The structural model fits the data relatively well. RFID technology directly and positively impact both IIoT and Blockchain technologies which, in turn, directly and positively impact SCT. RFID technology indirectly affects SCT through both IIoT technology and Blockchain technology.

Research limitations/implications

This study is the first to empirically assess the impact of RFID, IIoT and Blockchain technologies on SCT. First-wave empirical studies must be replicated to support generalization of the findings.

Practical implications

This study provides empirical evidence to support the implementation of a combination of RFID, IIoT and Blockchain technologies as infrastructure necessary to achieve end-to-end SCT.

Originality/value

New measurement scales for IIoT technology utilization and Blockchain technology utilization are developed and assessed for validity and reliability. This is the first study to assess the combined impact of RFID, IIoT and Blockchain technologies on SCT.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Jeramy Meacham, Lisa Toms, Kenneth W. Green and Vikram S. Bhadauria

This paper aims to theorize and assess a structural model that depicts the impact of an organization's capability to share information with supply chain partners through a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorize and assess a structural model that depicts the impact of an organization's capability to share information with supply chain partners through a focused green information system for the purpose of improving environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 159 manufacturing managers and analyzed using a structural equation modeling methodology.

Findings

The general capability to share information with supply chain partners coupled with the specific capabilities of green information systems enhances environmental performance. Green information systems serve as a partial mediator to the relationship between supply chain information sharing and environmental performance.

Research limitations/implications

While environmental sustainability has implications for all categories of supply chain partners, the study sample focuses on the manufacturing sector only.

Practical implications

Evidence supports the need for manufacturers to develop information sharing and green information system capabilities to improve environmental performance.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to empirically assess the role of information systems in achieving environmental sustainability. The results of this investigation support the proposition that information sharing among supply chain partners is a key to achieving environmental sustainability.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Kenneth W. Green, Pamela J. Zelbst, Vikram S. Bhadauria and Jeramy Meacham

The purpose of this paper is to contribute significantly to the first wave of empirical investigations related to the impact of green supply chain management practices on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute significantly to the first wave of empirical investigations related to the impact of green supply chain management practices on environmental and organizational performance from a manufacturer's perspective within a supply chain context.

Design/methodology/approach

An environmental collaboration and monitoring performance model is theorized and assessed following a structural equation methodology. Data were collected from 159 manufacturing managers through an on‐line survey.

Findings

Environmental collaboration and monitoring practices among supply chain partners are found to lead to improved environmental performance and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

As a first wave investigation of the impact of green supply chain management practices on performance, the study is somewhat exploratory.

Practical implications

Practitioners are provided with a framework for assessing the impact of environmental collaboration and monitoring practices among supply chain partners on environmental performance and organizational performance. The study provides evidence that green supply chain practices lead to improved environmental and organizational performance.

Social implications

The results also have important societal implications. While green supply chain management practices enhance the economic sustainability of the firm, they also positively impact society through improvements to the overall environment.

Originality/value

The results of this investigation support the proposition that implementation of environmental collaboration and monitoring practices by supply chain partners are both environmentally necessary and good business. The paper provides manufacturing managers with a structured approach to improving both environmental and organizational performance through environmental collaboration and monitoring with customers and suppliers.

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

James W. Clark, Lisa C. Toms and Kenneth W. Green

The theoretical framework for market-oriented sustainability developed by Crittenden, Crittenden, Ferrell, Ferrell, and Pinney, in which the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The theoretical framework for market-oriented sustainability developed by Crittenden, Crittenden, Ferrell, Ferrell, and Pinney, in which the relationship between organizational culture and performance management is theorized as moderated by stakeholder involvement, is empirically assessed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Crittenden et al. model is operationalized using market orientation to represent organizational culture and climate, logistics performance to represent performance management, and green purchasing to represent the moderator stakeholder involvement in sustainability. The model is assessed using data collected from a sample of 257 manufacturing managers working for US manufacturing plants. A partial least squares structural equation modeling approach is used to statistically assess for measurement scale validity and reliability and the moderated model.

Findings

The results support the conceptual framework for market-oriented sustainability theorized by Crittenden et al. Organization culture in the form of market orientation interacts with stakeholder involvement in sustainability in the form of green purchasing to enhance performance monitoring in the form of logistics performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study is one of the first to empirically assess the market-oriented sustainability model. Only one set of potential constructs (market orientation, green purchasing, and logistics performance) is used to test the overall model thus limiting the generalization of the results.

Practical implications

The results indicate that manufacturing managers should work to establish and improve market orientation as a direct way of making their plants and organizations environmentally sustainable and that manufacturing managers interact with supply chain partners, specifically suppliers, to satisfy customer demands for eco-friendly products and services.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to empirically assess the general form of the market-oriented sustainability model.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 114 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Kenneth W. Green, Pamela J. Zelbst, Jeramy Meacham and Vikram S. Bhadauria

The aim is to contribute significantly to the first wave of empirical investigations related to the impact of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices on…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to contribute significantly to the first wave of empirical investigations related to the impact of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices on performance. The paper also aims to theorize and empirically assess a comprehensive GSCM practices and performance model. The model incorporates green supply chain practices that link manufacturers with supply chain partners (both suppliers and customers) to support environmental sustainability throughout the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 159 manufacturing managers were analyzed using a structural equation modeling methodology. Manufacturing managers provide data reflecting the degree to which their organizations work with suppliers and customers to improve environmental sustainability of the supply chain.

Findings

Generally, the adoption of GSCM practices by manufacturing organizations leads to improved environmental performance and economic performance, which, in turn, positively impact operational performance. Operational performance enhances organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

As a first wave empirical investigation of the impact of GSCM practices on performance, the study is by necessity exploratory.

Practical implications

Practitioners are provided with a framework for assessing the synergistic impact of GSCM practices on performance. Internal environmental management and green information systems are identified as necessary precursors to the implementation of green purchasing, cooperation with customers, eco‐design, and investment recovery.

Originality/value

A comprehensive GSCM practices performance model is proposed and empirically assessed. The results of this investigation support the proposition that GSCM practices are both environmentally necessary and good business. A structured two‐wave approach to the implementation of GSCM practices is recommended.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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