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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Kenneth B. Kahn

The paper aims to address the issue of generalizability by examining process formality across the global regions of North America, Europe and Asia. A common prescription…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to address the issue of generalizability by examining process formality across the global regions of North America, Europe and Asia. A common prescription in the new product development (NPD) discipline is to employ a formal process. Because generalizability of this prescription has not been fully investigated across global regions, the present manuscript addresses the issue of generalizability by examining process formality across the global regions of North America, Europe and Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

Recently made available to researchers, data of the Product Development and Management Association’s 2012 Comparative Performance Assessment Study (CPAS) were analyzed. The uniqueness of the 2012 CPAS data set is its global composition with sizable samples from North America, Europe and Asia. Chi-square tests and multivariate analysis of variance were applied.

Findings

Results support use of a formal process, as companies with a formal NPD process perceived higher performance than companies with no standard process. Process formality appears to differ across regions and be influenced by innovation strategy. European firms tended to not use a formal process when pursuing radical innovation, and these firms perceived higher performance. North American firms tended to not use a formal process when pursing incremental innovation, but these firms perceived lower performance.

Practical implications

Having some NPD process is generally better than not having any process at all. Process differences across regions appear to exist when pursuing radical innovation or incremental innovation.

Originality/value

This is one of few studies comparing global regions to examine generalizability of a best practice prescription, namely, the extent to which a formal process should be implemented.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Kenneth B. Kahn and John T. Mentzer

Suggests that while integration is a term that logistics discusses in an interorganizational context, integration within an interdepartmental integration is not as…

Abstract

Suggests that while integration is a term that logistics discusses in an interorganizational context, integration within an interdepartmental integration is not as prevalent. Consequently, a common definition for “integration” is lacking. Literature has provided three characterizations: integration represents interaction or communication activities; integration consists of collaborative activities between departments; and integration is a composite of interdepartmental intraction and interdepartmental collaboration. Adopting the composite view, prescribes that managers and researchers consider integration to be a multidimensional process. Proposes a model is based on this perspective to suggest that different logistics situations will require varying degrees of integration via interaction and collaboration. Managerial implications are discussed for each situation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Kenneth Kahn and Jaycee Dempsey

The center for innovation model is a growing and prominent phenomenon across corporate, government, nonprofit, and university contexts. Based on the name, one would infer…

Abstract

The center for innovation model is a growing and prominent phenomenon across corporate, government, nonprofit, and university contexts. Based on the name, one would infer an aim is to serve as a mechanism that catalyzes innovation. A further aim would be to serve as exemplars of technology development, knowledge development, and knowledge dissemination in the course of delivering a given mission. To date, little work has examined the center for innovation phenomenon and so there is a need to investigate these inferences and provide an understanding for the basis and rationale for why organizations across various contexts are pursuing centers for innovation. Examining mission statements followed by an electronic survey of 66 centers for innovation, we characterize the practices, rationales, success factors, challenges, and other descriptors of these centers in an effort to understand their operating characteristics. Results suggest four archetypes for the center for innovation model based on constituency. Results also show similarities across success factors and challenges, with sustainable funding clearly a common challenge.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Geng Cui, Ling Peng and Laurent Pierre Florès

New product concept screening, i.e., selecting a few viable innovative concepts from numerous candidates, involves high stakes and is complicated and resource intensive…

Abstract

Purpose

New product concept screening, i.e., selecting a few viable innovative concepts from numerous candidates, involves high stakes and is complicated and resource intensive. Over the years, there has been heated debate about the relative merit of monadic (sequential) tests vs that of preference-based paired comparisons. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes the Generalizability Theory as a framework to assess and compare the performance of traditional monadic test with the Adaptive Concept Screening (ACS) in terms of their testing results and psychometric quality.

Findings

Using 50 yogurt concepts and two independent groups of respondents, the results indicate that ACS requires a significant smaller sample of respondents to achieve a necessary minimum G coefficient for decision making. Moreover, ACS offers a more discriminating and reliable solution for early stage concept screening as manifested by a higher G coefficient and greater percentage of variance due to the selected concepts given the same sampling design.

Practical implications

The results lend strong support to ACS as a more cost-effective method for screening new product concepts and the Generalizability Theory as a systematic framework for assessing concept testing methods.

Originality/value

This study adopts the Generalizability Theory framework to assess the validity of new product concept screening method.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Tun-Chih Kou and Bruce C. Y. Lee

The purpose of this study is to fill the gaps in previous literature and investigate the link between product launch performance and supply chain architecture and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to fill the gaps in previous literature and investigate the link between product launch performance and supply chain architecture and performance. During the past 20 years, most of the new product literature has focused on new product development and product innovation. Only a few product launches have been discussed in specific fields.

Design/methodology/approach

From the perspective of the manufacturer, interfunctional coordination, supply chain architecture and supply chain performance affect lean launch performance. Lean launches can also add value to product and marketing performance. A questionnaire was used to gather data from project, account and purchasing managers in the high-tech industry and to test the postulated research model and hypotheses. The conceptual model was tested using 242 usable questionnaires.

Findings

The results provide evidence that interfunctional coordination is the basis for improving supply chain architecture. The supply chain has a strong, positive effect on lean launch performance. Lean launch is vital to the successful performance of a new product. Although lean launch execution and supply chain performance affect marketing performance and new product performance, the direct effect on marketing performance is non-significant.

Originality/value

This study presents the characteristics of the supply chain architecture specific to the high-tech industry. The authors empirically tested and propose a model to explain how high-tech manufacturers build a solid supply chain and leverage the capabilities of suppliers to improve lean launch execution and new product performance.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Tun-Chih Kou, Bruce C. Y. Lee and Chiou-Fong Wei

Most new product research for the past two decades has focussed on new product development and product innovation. Only a few product launches have been discussed in…

Abstract

Purpose

Most new product research for the past two decades has focussed on new product development and product innovation. Only a few product launches have been discussed in specific fields. The purpose of this paper is to fill the literature gap regarding enhanced product launch performance by using the customer relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

From the contract manufacturer’s perspective, the authors propose that the customer relationship and senior management involvement affects lean launch execution. The customer relationship includes both cooperativeness and behavior monitoring. Studies have suggested that a lean launch exerts a direct influence on new product performance and marketing performance. We used a questionnaire to collect data to test the postulated research model and hypotheses from project, account, and purchasing managers in the high-tech manufacturing industry.

Findings

The results provided compelling evidence that the customer relationship exerts a positive effect on lean launch, which in turn exerts a positive effect on new product performance. Although lean launch execution affected marketing performance through new product performance, the direct effect on marketing performance was non-significant. Senior management involvement exerted an indirect influence on lean launch performance through cooperativeness.

Originality/value

This paper suggests and empirically tests a model to explain how contract manufacturers manage brand-customer relationship through cooperativeness and behavior monitoring, leading to higher levels of lean launch execution toward new product performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1969

ROBERT B. BRUMBAUGH

This paper, which is a structural‐functional attempt to explain a restricted domain of interpersonal perception within the school as an organization, presents some of the…

Abstract

This paper, which is a structural‐functional attempt to explain a restricted domain of interpersonal perception within the school as an organization, presents some of the author's findings as a clue to one possible effect of the hierarchically contrived authority system of the school on certain of the organizational participants' perceptions of one another. If the findings and theory are valid, they may help to explain one of the explicit ways in which the school may he exploitive of the individual—exploitive in the sense that not all of the individual's interpersonal needs may be equally relevant to the organization's strivings towards goal attainment. The economy necessarily associated with organizational goal attainment and the resulting expediency for an adequate flow of organizational authority may operate to induce a lack of organizational recognition of certain of the individual's vital interpersonal needs. The author proposes his notes toward a theory in an effort to explain how and why people come to perceive certain other people as they do within the context of the school as an organization.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Vicky Ching Gu and James R. Burns

This paper aims to study the drug launch strategies and their effects on new drug performance in an intensely competitive emerging pharmaceutical market such as the one in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the drug launch strategies and their effects on new drug performance in an intensely competitive emerging pharmaceutical market such as the one in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on market share, sales, related firm size and annual profit were obtained for the period, 2004-2008. Profile deviation and cluster analysis approaches were applied in this study.

Findings

There is a significant effect of an optimal launch strategy on new drug performance given the respective resource availability and the market environment situations.

Practical implications

The study suggests that multi-national corporations may prove resilient in the emerging economies through both innovative and cost-driven offerings in different therapeutic categories.

Originality/value

This research is unique in studying the drug launch strategies across both foreign firms and local firms in a competitive emerging pharmaceutical market.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Tun-Chih Kou, Chang-Tang Chiang and Ai-Hsuan Chiang

Some studies have suggested that a supply chain augmented with information technology (IT) has a positive effect on performance in the marketplace. However, these studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Some studies have suggested that a supply chain augmented with information technology (IT) has a positive effect on performance in the marketplace. However, these studies have not explained how the IT-based supply chain achieves this superior performance. This study aims to reveal some of the mediating influences at play: the new product development (NPD) activities of product launch, product innovativeness and product development capability.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking the electronics manufacturer’s perspective, this study took a resource-based view to propose that NPD activities are affected by IT advancement and that IT-based supply chain architecture is a critical resource that ultimately affects new product performance. Thus study focuses on product launch, because this is the most expensive and risky stage of NPD; product innovativeness, because it plays a substantial role in achieving a competitive advantage; and product development capability, because it leads to superior product performance. A questionnaire was used to collect data from managers of projects, products and supply chains of computer and communication electronics manufacturers; 235 valid questionnaires were returned. These data were subsequently analyzed using a variety of statistical methods.

Findings

The results support that manufacturers’ IT resources enable them to enhance NPD activities effectively with their suppliers, and that NPD activities play a key role in moderating the relationship between IT-based supply chains and new product performance.

Originality/value

This paper provides an empirically tested model of how IT-based supply chain architecture can lead to superior new product performance through product lean launch, product innovativeness and product development capability.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2009

Robert J. Antonio

During the great post–World War II economic expansion, modernization theorists held that the new American capitalism balanced mass production and mass consumption, meshed…

Abstract

During the great post–World War II economic expansion, modernization theorists held that the new American capitalism balanced mass production and mass consumption, meshed profitability with labor's interests, and ended class conflict. They thought that Keynesian policies insured a near full-employment, low-inflation, continuous growth economy. They viewed the United States as the “new lead society,” eliminating industrial capitalism's backward features and progressing toward modernity's penultimate “postindustrial” stage.7 Many Americans believed that the ideal of “consumer freedom,” forged early in the century, had been widely realized and epitomized American democracy's superiority to communism.8 However, critics held that the new capitalism did not solve all of classical capitalism's problems (e.g., poverty) and that much increased consumption generated new types of cultural and political problems. John Kenneth Galbraith argued that mainstream economists assumed that human nature dictates an unlimited “urgency of wants,” naturalizing ever increasing production and consumption and precluding the distinction of goods required to meet basic needs from those that stoke wasteful, destructive appetites. In his view, mainstream economists’ individualistic, acquisitive presuppositions crown consumers sovereign and obscure cultural forces, especially advertising, that generate and channel desire and elevate possessions and consumption into the prime measures of self-worth. Galbraith held that production's “paramount position” and related “imperatives of consumer demand” create dependence on economic growth and generate new imbalances and insecurities.9 Harsher critics held that the consumer culture blinded middle-class Americans to injustice, despotic bureaucracy, and drudge work (e.g., Mills, 1961; Marcuse, 1964). But even these radical critics implied that postwar capitalism unlocked the secret of sustained economic growth.

Details

Nature, Knowledge and Negation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-606-9

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