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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Andrew Kenneth Shenton

This paper aims to explore the placement of the skill of reading in models devoted to information behaviour and information literacy process frameworks, with particular…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the placement of the skill of reading in models devoted to information behaviour and information literacy process frameworks, with particular attention to children and young people.

Design/methodology/approach

The work is based on an analysis of pertinent literature that has been published over a period of some 80 years. The sources include monographs, essays in books, academic journal papers, conference proceedings and articles in professional periodicals.

Findings

Much thinking on information behaviour tends to assume that reading takes place either for leisure purposes or to support study, whilst information literacy (IL) frameworks typically either emphasise higher-order reading skills or present generic stages in which reading is subsumed within a category of more abstract action. Many IL models implicitly assume that the individual has already mastered the fundamentals of reading.

Research limitations/implications

Although extensive, the author’s literature review is by no means exhaustive. It does not refer to all models of either information behaviour or information literacy.

Practical implications

Information professionals need to acknowledge the true variety of motivations that prompt young people to read, and those responsible for information literacy instruction must determine how far they view their role as providing teaching in basic reading skills.

Originality/value

The paper is unusual in examining reading from two quite different perspectives - those of information behaviour and information literacy - and, despite its academic orientation, concludes with a range of suggestions intended to be of use to practising librarians.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Kenneth Andrew Searle, Liz Ellis, Marianthi Kourti, Andrea MacLeod, Caroline Lear, Callum Duckworth, Davide Irvine, Harry Jones, Michaela King, Jessica Ling and John Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs) the opportunity to design and undertake a project researching the experiences of autistic university students.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory approach was implemented, engaging autistic university students as research assistants. All the research team except project co-ordinators were autistic. Undergraduate autistic students developed and conducted a set of semi-structured interviews, with two autistic alumni responsible for data analysis and both scheduling and moderating focus groups. Participation in dissemination of the findings was open to all.

Findings

The results included in this paper reflect a portion of the overall findings, specifically regarding the participatory approach. The findings of the study indicate the perceptions of respondents being interviewed by autistic researchers in relation to their shared understanding, facilitating positive feelings and a sense of rapport in the interview process. The PAs were able to improve their research skills through the project, which contributed constructively to their CV and allowed them to feel more positive about being autistic, and specifically about being an autistic researcher.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to discuss the challenges and benefits of including autistic participant researchers at all stages of the research project, including research design, data collection, analysis and dissemination, being co-written by both project co-ordinators and autistic project researchers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb010746. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb010746. When citing the article, please cite: Kenneth Andrew, (1985), “This Little Piggy Went to Market”, International Journal of Bank Marketing, Vol. 3 Iss: 1, pp. 3 - 21.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Kenneth Andrew

British banks face formidable challenges in the future which can be mastered only with total dedication and full commitment to marketing and the consumer. The NatWest Bank…

Abstract

British banks face formidable challenges in the future which can be mastered only with total dedication and full commitment to marketing and the consumer. The NatWest Bank experience provides some pointers and examples regarding banks facing up to the marketing challenge, an experience based around four objectives: understanding of, and commitment to, marketing by senior executives; shifting the “culture” through 60,000 employees; establishing and developing marketing skills; and the aim that all the above be achieved within a reasonable timeframe.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Kenneth Andrew

The philosophy behind banks' current High Street profiles is based on four main guidelines: the need for cash movement; security of staff/money from robberies; indication…

Abstract

The philosophy behind banks' current High Street profiles is based on four main guidelines: the need for cash movement; security of staff/money from robberies; indication of stability/substance; and wide facility for in‐/out‐payments. This has led to a perception of bank branches as cold, unfriendly places, discouraging customer visits. The retailing approach will impact on branch style and structure, possibly creating individual, business‐specific banks within banks which can deal with both the heavy user cash customer and the high net worth customer, in the same way that aircraft travel is sold as business, economy and first class services through the same aircraft and facilities. With ATMs and home banking (such as the Minitel system being pioneered in France) reducing cash security requirements, bank branches will be able to exploit the freedom from counter barriers to make customers feel more welcome. Finally staff must be trained and helped, through incentives, to take a more positive and welcoming attitude.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

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Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Geoff Hoare, Kenneth Lee and Andrew Long

The development of any discussion paper presupposes that two initial requirements have already been satisfied: the first, that there is no ambiguity about the meaning of…

Abstract

The development of any discussion paper presupposes that two initial requirements have already been satisfied: the first, that there is no ambiguity about the meaning of the terms of reference to be used in the subsequent discussion; the second, that the area under consideration is clearly identified, and that the limits or boundaries of study have been carefully delineated.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Kenneth Andrew

This monograph covers a number of key articlesand presentations by the author over the lastdecade. The points contained in them reflect aclear belief based on experience…

Abstract

This monograph covers a number of key articles and presentations by the author over the last decade. The points contained in them reflect a clear belief based on experience of creating significant cultural change so that banks become more market‐driven and customer‐orientated. Many of the forecasts made in the articles have become a reality in the marketplace. This monograph begins with a description of changes over the last decade: the introduction of the marketing function into banks, consumer responses, new competitors, technological developments, and the impact of Government. Marketing has faced many difficulties in the banking industry and competitive breakthroughs have not been easy to achieve. Many leaders in the industry believe in business/marketing strategy evolving in close association with IT planning – this is the second topic, IT support may be crucial. The importance of advertising and management of agency relationships is the subject of Chapter 3 – how can it be effectively used? Chapter 4 looks at the ways in which the consumer is presently getting a better deal; Chapter 5 describes the marketing success of the NatWest Piggy Bank within the context of a changing marketing culture. A wider repertoire of marketing techniques are used in the USA (Chapter 6) but if they are to be used in the same way here then the situation will need to approximate more closely to that of the USA – credit and credit cards are the particular focus and the US market is more aggressive. Chapters 7‐9 look at the future of financial services marketing from the retailer′s perspective – the retailer′s detailed approach to a possible new business has distinctive strengths, but their actual opportunities in this market may be restricted to an extent by, for example, inexperience and so lower credibility as vendors of some specialised services like investment management. Chapter 10 appraises the value and strategic nature of market research. Chapter 11 considers the movement of building societies into the wider personal financial services marketplace, the product′s role in the marketing mix, and the impact of the Single Market in Europe. Chapter 12 singles out the cost‐effective technique of automated vetting of customers′ creditworthiness from the special viewpoint of the building society. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the changing market and future prospects: the world of finance is no longer simple; money is no longer the common denominator; the consumer is now the focus; competition to provide services is fierce; the future is exciting!

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Andrew Kenneth Shenton

– The paper aims to explore the purposes of school libraries as they are viewed by teenagers attending a high school in northern England.

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the purposes of school libraries as they are viewed by teenagers attending a high school in northern England.

Design/methodology/approach

The work is based on qualitative data contributed by 245 youngsters. Their material was coded inductively and frequency counts were generated in order to determine the balance of the data in relation to individual themes.

Findings

Typically, the school library was understood as an area that made available books either for pleasure reading or academic purposes. No participant referred either to the work of librarians or to the value of libraries in enabling the user to find information in support of personal interests.

Research limitations/implications

The research took place in only one school and it may well have been the case that many students who were apathetic towards school libraries simply declined the opportunity to participate in the work.

Practical implications

Although the attitudes of the young people who contributed data were to an overwhelming degree constructive, key gaps were evident in their awareness of the potential of a school library. These are best rectified by managers developing their facility in such a way that it serves to demonstrate effectively to students the roles that the school library can play in a diversity of situations.

Originality/value

Much of the published literature dealing with the purposes of school libraries and the prerequisites necessary to ensure their effectiveness pays little regard to the ideas of young people themselves. This paper goes some way towards remedying the deficiency.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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