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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

James J. Vardalis, Kendra N. Bowen and Shannon Waters‐Bland

Due to several factors that include a declining economy, high unemployment, home down‐sizing trends and the aging population, the weekend private home sales have permeated…

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Abstract

Purpose

Due to several factors that include a declining economy, high unemployment, home down‐sizing trends and the aging population, the weekend private home sales have permeated every residential neighborhood in the country. Countless households have garage sales, and many times they contain items of considerable value. Little is known about this vast phenomenon and its potential for criminal opportunity. Based on a survey of North Texas residents that held a garage sale, the authors aimed to extract some important findings on a topic that has had little attention.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the exploratory nature of the study, descriptive statistics were utilized to provide insight into what takes place at garage sales. The areas of concentration in this research included the independent variables of the home garage sale environment and the dependent variables of theft and deviant behavior. Although several environmental factors were examined.

Findings

Findings included thefts, inquiry to buy guns, small organized groups working to distract watchers, changing prices, and attempting intimidation with inappropriate remarks.

Research limitations/implications

This research has several limitations that require explanation. First, the authors utilized a convenience sample by mailing to addresses from public newspapers. The study findings suggested that future research utilize a larger random sample of different areas over a longer period of time to increase generalizability.

Practical implications

The researchers realize that each state and city may be different from the area studied and may not be applicable to everyone. Nevertheless, this study highlights the need for, as well as provides the basis for, additional interest in determining crime at garage and yard sales.

Social implications

The study suggested offenders may be attracted into neighborhoods where, as strangers, they are not recognized as strangers therefore allowing them unrestricted access to communities.

Originality/value

Crime and associated criminal activity and yard sales have been overlooked. Not until they seem to permeate every neighborhood has anyone related them to crime. Little is known about this vast phenomenon and its potential for criminal opportunity.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Kendra Bowen, Erika Frenzel and Jason D. Spraitz

In the USA, sex offender policy research has focussed on demographic characteristics of registrants, recidivism rates of registrants, accuracy and completeness of listed…

Abstract

Purpose

In the USA, sex offender policy research has focussed on demographic characteristics of registrants, recidivism rates of registrants, accuracy and completeness of listed information, and the collateral consequences experienced by registrants. This growing body of research demonstrates the need to explore offender perceptions of sex offender registration and notification (SORN) laws. The purpose of this paper is to assess whether registration related variables influenced sex offenders’ opinions about the registry, compliance with the registry, self-worth, and deterrence perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilized a sample of 286 male registered sex offenders (RSO) in Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. Four multivariate regression models were run to examine registration related variables impact on sex offender opinions of the registry, registry compliance, feelings of self-worth, and perceptions of deterrence.

Findings

The multivariate regression results suggest registration related variables have a significant impact on RSO opinion of the registry, compliance with the registry, and opinions of self. Specifically, the number of collateral consequences that one experienced, police contacts that RSOs had, and being recognized as a sex offender were significantly related to the dependent variables in the regression models.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of research that indicates sex offenders experience a myriad of consequences that are outside the scope of the registered sex offender laws. Policy implications and societal consequences of these findings are discussed, as well as a future research agenda.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Tim Bateman and Hannah Smithson

53

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Erastus Karanja and Laurell C. Malone

Although project management (PM) continues to rise in popularity, there is still a significant PM talent deficit, leading to more challenged or failing projects. To lower…

Abstract

Purpose

Although project management (PM) continues to rise in popularity, there is still a significant PM talent deficit, leading to more challenged or failing projects. To lower the PM talent deficit and mitigate the higher project failure rates, academic institutions have been developing PM curriculums aimed at inculcating a repertoire of competencies to the potential project managers. In developing an ideal well-rounded PM curriculum, academic institutions occasionally engage the input of industry partners and governing entities. The study aims to (1) compare the competencies in one of the leading industry competency model and framework (PMI Talent Triangle) to the competencies in the PM course syllabi learning outcomes, (2) determine the extent to which these two sets of PM competencies are aligned and (3) and explore avenues for improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a purposeful sampling method to gather PM course syllabi. The PM competencies data are gleaned from the syllabi using the content analysis method. Thereafter, QSR NVivo qualitative statistical software is used to summarize and analyze the competency data from the learning outcomes.

Findings

The results reveal that most of the PM competencies in the course syllabi fall under the technical PM domain. Specifically, the top three competency elements in each domain are technical PM domain (PM skills, tools and techniques, schedule management and cost estimation/budget), leadership domain (team-building, verbal/written communication and problem-solving) and strategic and business management domain (strategic planning, analysis and alignment, benefits management and realization, customer relationship and satisfaction).

Research limitations/implications

The study investigates the alignment of the PM course competencies with competency domains in the PMI Talent Triangle, a global competence model that is well aligned with other global competence models such as the APM Competence Framework, the ICB4 Individual Competence Baseline and the PROMA3.

Practical implications

The results from this study provide guidelines useful in informing PM curricula re/design, as well as the inculcation of knowledge, skills, tools, techniques and behaviors needed for effective PM.

Social implications

The PM curriculum can be improved by partnering with PM industry leaders who can serve as advisors to the academy on industry needs, direction and emerging innovations that can inform PM learning outcomes, PM curricular design and the development of quality PM talent. The academy and the industry are encouraged to actively strive for mutual partnerships where PM professionals and academicians serve on each other's advisory boards. Also, the academy can partner with the industry professionals by developing curriculum resources such as case studies that bring the real-life PM applications to the classroom.

Originality/value

This study is motivated by the call for research studies that provide a holistic picture of the desired PM competencies and an exploration and definition of the educational needs in the PM curriculum.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2016

Abhishek Gon and Cristina Mititelu

This chapter explores the CSR conceptual framework, with a particular focus on the CSR policy diffusion and integration in the corporate banking in India. In a nutshell…

Abstract

This chapter explores the CSR conceptual framework, with a particular focus on the CSR policy diffusion and integration in the corporate banking in India. In a nutshell, the research has threefold objectives, it explores: the dynamics of the CSR conceptual development, sketching out the main contextual drivers leading to CSR policy importance in developed/developing countries; the CSR evolution in Indian scenario, pointing out India’s cultural and institutional contextual factors; and the context of banking sector regulations on CSR policy and guidelines. The analysis is supported by a comparative multiple case study analysis, on three leading public banks: State Bank of India (SBI), Bank of Baroda and Punjab National Bank. The rationale for case selection is based on the social and environmental implications of banking financial decisions on the matter. The banking sector is still at the initial stage of integrating CSR policies in their regulations. The findings reveal increasing attention among the banks towards the adoption of social banking regulations. There is a substantial body of empirical evidence showing that the newly CSR core values and guidelines at international level have often had little effect on CSR practice in the banking sector at the country level. The research shows that it is important to look at the CSR evolution through an integrated model of analysis, based on conceptual and empirical evidence. It pointed out an integrated model of analysis of the banking sector through the lens of comparative case studies.

Details

Accountability and Social Responsibility: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-384-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Joo Y. Jung, Yong Jian Wang and Sibin Wu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between competitive strategy, total quality management (TQM), and continuous improvement of international project…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between competitive strategy, total quality management (TQM), and continuous improvement of international project management (CIIPM).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, a theoretical model and five hypotheses are developed. A cross‐sectional data set collected from 268 international project managers based in four countries is used to test the theoretical model.

Findings

The results from the statistical analysis suggest that competitive strategy does not directly influence the CIIPM performance, but it influences through the mediation of TQM practices. The results also suggest that “human resource‐based” TQM elements have stronger influence toward CIIPM performance than “technology‐based” TQM elements.

Research limitations/implications

The study used four TQM variables, which originated from the MBNQA (1995) framework. Although the four variables are robust and sufficiently represent the TQM dimension, the multi‐dimensional nature of TQM practice can be investigated further. Further, the study only utilized a single variable of CIIPM in investigating international project management performance. As future TQM and international project management practices go through evolutions, additional elements may be incorporated into the three‐domain contingency model.

Practical implications

The study results suggest that the TQM elements fully mediate the relationship between competitive strategy and CIIPM. This implies that organizations need an innovative management methodology, such as the TQM practice, in order to achieve competitive strategy materializing towards international project management performance. Further, the findings suggest that it is the soft TQM elements (i.e. top management's leadership, compensation, training and empowerment) that impact the CIIPM more significantly.

Originality/value

Although numerous classical studies are reported in various contexts involving competitive strategy, TQM practice, and project management performance, no existing study focuses on how these three domains are linked together.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Raphael Rogans-Watson, Caroline Shulman, Dan Lewer, Megan Armstrong and Briony Hudson

The purpose of this paper is to assess frailty, geriatric conditions and multimorbidity in people experiencing homelessness (PEH) using holistic evaluations based on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess frailty, geriatric conditions and multimorbidity in people experiencing homelessness (PEH) using holistic evaluations based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and draw comparisons with general population survey data.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional observational study conducted in a London-based hostel for single PEH over 30 years old in March–April 2019. The participants and key workers completed health-related questionnaires, and geriatric conditions were identified using standardised assessments. Frailty was defined according to five criteria in Fried’s phenotype model and multimorbidity as the presence of two or more long-term conditions (LTCs). Comparisons with the general population were made using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and the Health Survey for England.

Findings

A total of 33 people participated with a mean age of 55.7 years (range 38–74). Frailty was identified in 55% and pre-frailty in 39%. Participants met an average of 2.6/5 frailty criteria, comparable to 89-year-olds in the general population. The most common geriatric conditions were: falls (in 61%), visual impairment (61%), low grip strength (61%), mobility impairment (52%) and cognitive impairment (45%). All participants had multimorbidity. The average of 7.2 LTCs (range 2–14) per study participant far exceeds the average for even the oldest people in the general population.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first UK-based study measuring frailty and geriatric conditions in PEH and the first anywhere to do so within a CGA-type evaluation. It also demonstrates the feasibility of conducting holistic evaluations in this setting, which may be used clinically to improve the health outcomes for PEH.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 23 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

Chiara Carolina Donelli, Simone Fanelli, Antonello Zangrandi and Marco Elefanti

Healthcare organizations worldwide were badly hit by the “surprise” of the pandemic. Hospitals in particular are trying hard to manage problems it caused, searching for…

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Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare organizations worldwide were badly hit by the “surprise” of the pandemic. Hospitals in particular are trying hard to manage problems it caused, searching for solutions to protect the health of citizens and reorienting operations. The implementation of resilience solutions in the coping phase and the ability to react promptly and redefine activities is essential. Integrating crisis management and resiliency literature, this paper discusses how health organizations were able to cope with adversity during the crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is conducted through a case study of a large Italian hospital, the Gemelli Polyclinic Foundation, which was one of the leading hospitals in the Italian response to the pandemic.

Findings

The case reports actions taken in order to continue functioning and to maintain core activities despite severe adversity. The overall response of the Gemelli was the result of the three types of response: behavioral (effective leadership), cognitive (rapid resource reallocation) and the contextual reinforcement (multiagency network response). The authors highlight how an integrative framework of crisis management and resiliency could be applied to healthcare organizations in the coping phase of the pandemic. The experience of the Gemelli can thus be useful for other hospitals and organizations facing external crises and for overall improvement of crisis management and resilience. Responding to crisis brings the opportunity to make innovations introduced during emergencies structural, and embed them moving forward.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses only on the coping phase of the response to the pandemic, whereas building long-term resilience requires understanding how organizations accumulate knowledge from crises and adapt to the “new normal.”

Originality/value

The paper responds to the call for empirical studies to advance knowledge of an integrative framework of crisis management and resiliency theories with reference to complex organizations such as healthcare.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 60 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Arnim Wiek, Robert Ries, Lanka Thabrew, Katja Brundiers and Anoja Wickramasinghe

Sustainable housing and community recovery processes in the aftermath of tsunamis have to cope with direct impacts, such as fatalities, destroyed buildings, and loss of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable housing and community recovery processes in the aftermath of tsunamis have to cope with direct impacts, such as fatalities, destroyed buildings, and loss of economic assets, as well as indirect impacts caused by shortcomings in recovery management. Recent studies on post‐tsunami recovery tend to focus on direct impacts, ranging from monitoring to prevention studies. Less attention is paid to recovery as a complex bundle of multi‐agent processes causing subsequent problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents results from field studies evaluating post‐tsunami recovery processes in Sri Lanka against the concept of sustainable housing and community recovery. Semi‐structured observations and interviews were conducted on eight sites in the south‐western part of Sri Lanka during field visits 2005‐2006. The research involved beneficiaries and other citizens, representatives from government and administration, field workers (non‐governmental organizations), and scientists.

Findings

Empirical findings identify subsequent problems for specific capital forms, across different capital forms, and across different administrative levels. Moreover, critical issues refer to conceptualizing temporal horizons, comprehensive planning and decision making, stakeholders' involvement, and institutional embedding of recovery processes.

Originality/value

Against this empirical background, the paper indicates improvement potentials referring to literature on comprehensive and adaptive planning to address the sustainable recovery challenges identified. The paper provides guidance for researchers, decision makers, planners, and field workers engaged in post‐disaster sustainable development.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Maureen T.B. Drysdale, Sarah A. Callaghan and Arpan Dhanota

This study examined sexual minority status on perceived sense of belonging and compared sexual minority students and exclusively heterosexual students as a function of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined sexual minority status on perceived sense of belonging and compared sexual minority students and exclusively heterosexual students as a function of participating in work-integrated learning (WIL).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, quantitative design was used with participants grouped by sexual minority status and participation in WIL.

Findings

Sexual minority students (WIL and non-WIL) reported lower sense of belonging than exclusively heterosexual students (in WIL and non-WIL). Sexual minority students in WIL also reported significantly weaker sense of belonging compared to non-WIL sexual minority students suggesting that WIL presents some barriers to establishing a strong sense of belonging for sexual minority students.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence for developing programs to ensure all students are in a safe environment where they can develop and strengthen their sense of belonging regardless of minority status. This is important given that a sense of belonging impacts mental health and overall well-being.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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