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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Alan McKinlay and Ken Starkey

Management strategy within the Ford Motor Company has been going through a quiet revolution in the last decade. From being a utility car producer understanding competitive…

Abstract

Management strategy within the Ford Motor Company has been going through a quiet revolution in the last decade. From being a utility car producer understanding competitive advantage exclusively in cost terms and equating management with control Ford have adopted a long‐term strategy of design‐led product innovation and promoting high trust labour relations. At the heart of this change strategy are the twin thrusts of ‘Participative Management’ aimed primarily at the executive level and ‘Employee Involvement’ for salaried and hourly employees. Both projects were borne of the watershed, if inherently flawed, ‘After Japan’ initiative of the early 1980s. ‘After Japan’ represented Ford's assimilation of the organisational — as well as economic — challenge thrown down by Japanese manufacturing. But what began as an ambitious attempt to impose Japanese factory institutions such as quality circles on a suspicious workforce rapidly degenerated into a conventional cost‐cutting exercise. From this experience, however, Ford's strategists moved towards a more processual, less mechanistic, understanding of organisational change. We shall examine the results of the ‘El’ process in a variety of settings and the impact of ‘PM’ on decision‐making processes within Ford UK.

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Management Research News, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Ken Starkey and Sue Tempest

The purpose of this paper is to question the purpose of the business school and its role in management education.

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4370

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to question the purpose of the business school and its role in management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops an historical analysis of the origins, development and identity of the business school, reflecting the views of the business school's multiple stakeholders. The paper reviews traditional business school design and how this is driven by particular concepts of purpose and identity. It questions whether these concepts are sustainable in the light of current forces for change.

Findings

The paper identifies the current major design challenges facing business schools as knowledge, narratives and practices and argues for a new narrative of sustainable strategic management as a guiding force for future development.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the current knowledge challenges facing business schools and argues that business schools need to rethink their focus on “school” as well as “business”.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Ken Starkey and Sue Tempest

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the current economic crisis offers an opportunity to rethink the role of the business school and how business schools can…

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1342

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the current economic crisis offers an opportunity to rethink the role of the business school and how business schools can reinvent what they do by an engagement with history and the design sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on an ongoing research project into the role of the business school. It provides an historical analysis of the business school's evolving role.

Findings

Debates about the nature of the business school fall into two camps, one that argues that the business school is a professional school, and another that says the business school needs to be a better social science school. This paper suggests an alternative perspective, more geared to a view of management as an art, rather than a science, offering less economics, more humanities and history.

Originality/value

The paper aligns itself with a growing call for business school reform and suggests how alternative disciplines might help shape its future.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jean-François Chanlat

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between language, thinking and society for explaining the degree of visibility of the French organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between language, thinking and society for explaining the degree of visibility of the French organizational studies (OS) production.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a sociological analysis based on Bourdieu field to understand the variation of reception the French OS production have had among the Anglo-Saxon field. The paper aims to underline some key elements, which can explain the differences of reception experienced by the French OS scientists. The paper opted for a general review using historical data; reviews of OS literature; and Google scholar, Web of Science and major OS Journal data.

Findings

The paper provides some evidence about how the degree of visibility of the French OS production is related to translation, cognitive and social resonance, producer place in the scientific network and relationship between the fields. It suggests that the degree of visibility is the result of a complex set of socio-cognitive schemes, social issues raised by the scholar and the place occupied by the researcher in the field.

Originality/value

The paper brings interesting ideas concerning the international development of the OS field, the degree of visibility of diverse contributions coming from non-English speaking researchers, notably the French ones, and how the dialogue between different linguistic and social universes can be ameliorated.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Carl Pracht

Kent Library of Southeast Missouri State University received an historic document in 1979. This document appeared to be a death warrant for Sarah Good from 1692. Sarah…

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374

Abstract

Kent Library of Southeast Missouri State University received an historic document in 1979. This document appeared to be a death warrant for Sarah Good from 1692. Sarah Good was executed for practicing witchcraft in Salem. After closer examination, the document was declared to be a forgery, with similar documents distributed during the 1930s. This article examines the history of this document, explains why the document was declared a forgery, further examines features that are often found in forgeries, and gives suggestions that libraries can use to identify forgeries.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Armand Hatchuel, Ken Starkey, Sue Tempest and Pascal Le Masson

We develop a discourse of strategic management as design, using a conceptual base drawing upon the work of Michel Foucault, as an alternative to the prevailing strategy…

Abstract

We develop a discourse of strategic management as design, using a conceptual base drawing upon the work of Michel Foucault, as an alternative to the prevailing strategy discourse (strategy as “economizing”). We then use contemporary design theory to theorize strategic management as a design activity in which the focus is on innovation, with the emphasis on future strategies based on the creation of desirable unknowns.

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The Globalization of Strategy Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-898-8

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Eric Cornuel

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177

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Abstract

Details

Rethinking the Business Models of Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-875-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Howard Thomas

Downloads
478

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Howard Thomas and Lynne Thomas

This paper aims to focus on leadership in business schools. It seeks to advocate examining strategic leadership processes through the exploration of interactions between…

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4991

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on leadership in business schools. It seeks to advocate examining strategic leadership processes through the exploration of interactions between such multiple constituencies as the dean, faculty, university councils and advisory boards.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of models of the leadership process are identified and illustrated, namely, the strategic leadership process model, a model of leadership dynamics and an interactionist model, involving an examination of leadership characteristics, context and leadership style.

Findings

The current financial crisis and criticisms of the business school in the modern university require deans to address changing models and contingencies, globalisation and moral values in curriculum evaluation and leadership of the business school. The importance of further in‐depth case studies of strategic leadership is emphasised.

Originality/value

Three areas of important research are identified, namely, the skills of leadership characteristics, leadership styles and change and leadership training. It is concluded that leadership can be taught but must be reinforced with on‐the‐job experience.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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