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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Emmanuel Mastio, Eng Chew and Kenneth Anthony Dovey

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the concept of the learning organization and that of the co-creation of value.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the concept of the learning organization and that of the co-creation of value.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual in nature and draws on data from a case study of a small highly innovative Australian company.

Findings

The authors show that, from a value co-creation perspective, the learning organization can be viewed as an open, collaborative, social/economic actor engaged in social/economic activities with other interdependent actors (organizations or stakeholders) in a network or ecosystem of actors to serve its mission/purpose and the well-being of the ecosystem.

Research limitations/implications

As a conceptual paper, the authors rely primarily on previous research as the basis for the argument. The implications of the findings are that, as value co-creation practices are founded upon the generation and leveraging of specific intangible capital resources, more research located in alternative research paradigms is required.

Practical implications

There are important implications for organizational leadership in that the practices that underpin value co-creation require the leadership to be able to work constructively with multiple forms of systemic and agentic power.

Social implications

In increasingly turbulent and hyper-competitive global operational contexts, sustainable value creation is becoming recognized as a collective achievement within a broad eco-system of collaborators. This has implications for the relational capabilities of all collaborators.

Originality/value

The authors introduce a new perspective on the role of power management in the facilitation of the co-creation of value. Arguing that value creation is becoming recognized as a “collective achievement”, they focus on the collaborative practices that enable such an achievement.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Ken Dovey, Amy Strydom, Barbara Penderis and Peter Kemp

The paper sets out to explore the leadership processes and dynamics of change management in a fragmented, and resource‐poor, health service in an impoverished rural region…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper sets out to explore the leadership processes and dynamics of change management in a fragmented, and resource‐poor, health service in an impoverished rural region in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines an action research process aimed at assisting the stakeholders of two rural clinics to integrate psychiatric care into the Primary Health Care service that they offer their respective communities. This involved the transformation of existing practices through a form of praxis that involved learning from action and acting on learning.

Findings

The findings of the paper relate to the role of leadership in the facilitation of transformational learning in team‐based social action. Four areas of leadership responsibility are highlighted: the transformation of inappropriate mental models; the development of strategic resilience; the shifting of the locus of control of stakeholders to a more internal position; and the creation of a social environment in which intangible capital resources are generated and leveraged in the collective interest.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is subject to the limitations of potential bias and distortion in action research. Although the “objective” evidence of the integration of psychiatric services at Pelsrus and Kwanomzamo clinics exists, the portrayal of the learning processes through which this was achieved could have been influenced unwittingly by the authors' own knowledge and other interests.

Practical implications

The paper endorses the educational importance of work‐based projects through which strong tacit leadership knowledge bases can be developed in health sector personnel.

Originality/value

This paper has attempted to share the effectiveness of work‐ and project‐based learning in district health teams in South Africa. In particular, it has outlined how the learning strategy of the module leverages the team structure of the district health management units in order to create and exploit the social and morale capital resources that are potentially available through such a structure and the covenantal culture that it spawns. Furthermore, an attempt has been made to show how these resources are leveraged in the generation of mission‐pertinent tacit knowledge that is then converted by project stakeholders into explicit knowledge forms that can be used more effectively in framing subsequent strategic action.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Ken Dovey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust in the collaborative learning processes that underpin innovation as a competitive strategy in organizations.

4281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust in the collaborative learning processes that underpin innovation as a competitive strategy in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

As a conceptual paper, the argument is framed by academic perspectives, drawn from the academic literature on the topic and by professional and life experience.

Findings

The collaborative learning practices that underpin idea generation and realization in organizations are strongly dependent for their effectiveness upon the availability, within and beyond stakeholder networks, of trust and other key social capital resources.

Practical implications

If innovation is dependent upon social capital resources, such as trust, then leadership endeavour needs to be much more focused upon the creation of a social environment that nurtures rich stakeholder and other relevant network, relationships. New forms of governance and power management, and more appropriate and aligned organizational structures, are required in organizations that are attempting to compete through innovation.

Originality/value

The paper's explication of the role of social capital resources, like trust, in organizational innovation offers new insights into this complex but increasingly vital form of competitive strategy.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ken Dovey and Jai Singhota

To explore the collective means through which professional sports teams learn and generate new knowledge forms in order to remain competitive in challenging global arenas…

2626

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the collective means through which professional sports teams learn and generate new knowledge forms in order to remain competitive in challenging global arenas, and to examine the applicability of these means to business organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives were achieved by drawing on the business and sporting experience of two executive coaches who have access to current elite‐level sports coaches. Through unstructured interviews with sports coaches and business executives over a period of years, the research question of collective learning in sports teams has been explored and its relevance to business contexts, analyzed.

Findings

Using social capital theory as an analytical lens, the research shows that organizational form is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of collective learning. This is the main reason why business teams are unable to emulate the successful learning that occurs in elite‐level sports teams. The research shows that the hierarchical structure of most business organizations constrains the development of the social capital necessary for sustained learning and knowledge construction.

Practical implications

The primary implication of the research findings is that business leaders need to view their role as that of creating and managing a social environment in which mission‐pertinent learning and knowledge construction activities are nurtured. In practice, it means that the nature of business leadership and, in particular, power management practices in business organizations needs to be questioned and re‐conceptualized.Originality/valueUsing social capital theory as a framework for the analysis of this phenomenon is new. The article should be valuable to the leader of any organization that is attempting to sustain superior competitive performance in the global knowledge economy.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ken Dovey and Richard White

This paper describes and analyses an attempt to engage in transformational learning, oriented to the development of a culture of innovation, at a medium‐size software…

2447

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes and analyses an attempt to engage in transformational learning, oriented to the development of a culture of innovation, at a medium‐size software development organization in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology was used whereby continuous cycles of strategic social learning were collectively theorized, implemented, evaluated and renewed.

Findings

The most important finding of this study is that of the influence of power relations and communication practices upon learning‐for‐innovation in organizations, and the need for the mediation of this influence through the creation of an organizational role that we have entitled an “external critic”. The case also shows the central importance of the relational dimension of social capital generation to learning and the sensitivity of this dimension to power relations.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides a rich analysis of one company's attempt to learn how to build and sustain a culture of innovation but, as with all case study research, the findings cannot be reliably generalized to other companies. Similarly, the case generates grounded theory that needs to be tested in other organizational contexts.

Practical implications

The case raises the issue of power management in organizations and its relationship to social learning practices. In particular, it argues for the establishment of a “negotiated order” in organizations (through a mission, vision and core values that are collectively and meaningfully constituted) and for the role of an “external critic” whereby the power of the executive, especially, can be mediated effectively in the interests of mission‐critical learning within the organization.

Originality/value

The paper offers an original strategy for the mediation of power in organizations in the interests of greater learning, creativity and innovation.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ken Dovey

The paper reports the outcomes of one module of a collaborative learning project aimed at the development of leadership capacity in district health management teams in the…

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Abstract

The paper reports the outcomes of one module of a collaborative learning project aimed at the development of leadership capacity in district health management teams in the East Cape province of South Africa. A work‐based learning methodology was selected for the module with the intention of developing strategic and procedural knowledge bases within these teams as a way of addressing the complex problems of policy implementation in South African state organisations. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of collaborative work‐based projects in developing team members’ capacity to solve difficult workplace problems and to implement strategy in a challenging operational environment. It endorses the role of leadership coaching in the development of, and ability to leverage, important strategic knowledge resources that reside within and between team members. The paper concludes with an example that demonstrates the developing ability of team members to initiate successful collaboration around the resolution of complex service delivery problems.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Eng Chew and Kenneth Anthony Dovey

This paper aims to report on case-study research that explores the role of leadership practices, in particular, in enhancing the capacity of an enterprise to learn to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on case-study research that explores the role of leadership practices, in particular, in enhancing the capacity of an enterprise to learn to create new value from a diverse range of sources. The capacity to sustain value creation over time, and across turbulent environments, increasingly differentiates enterprise performance. Under the umbrella term of “dynamic capabilities”, a range of practices have been identified in the literature as contributing to an enterprise’s ability to learn to perform this task successfully.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on case studies of three enterprises whose founders have sustained the creation of new value for customers over decades. Through a series of unstructured interviews with each founder, the tacit knowledge gained from years of learning how to create, and re-create, value, is made explicit through hermeneutic analysis of the interview transcripts.

Findings

The data identify four key areas of leadership practice that underpin the capacity to learn to continuously create new value over significant periods of time. The most important of these are the social practices that generate and leverage the intangible capital resources (in particular, the resource of trust) that underpin the collaborative learning on which value creation processes depend.

Research limitations/implications

As interpretive research, the knowledge accessed through this research is context-dependent and cannot be readily generalised. The validity of the knowledge is high, however, as the epistemological and ontological assumptions of the interpretive research paradigm recognise the political nature of organisations and, thus, of learning and value creation. As such, the knowledge generated by the case analyses offers a rich alternative perspective on the issue under research.

Practical implications

The cases illuminate the nature of learning that supports continuous value creation in enterprises. Such learning is framed by several leadership practices that enable the self-reflexivity that underpins the continuous conversion of action-generated tacit knowledge into more strategically useful explicit knowledge. At the core of these leadership practices is stakeholder collaboration and intellectual humility.

Social implications

The results show that learning to create sustainable value over time and diverse contexts, has a socio-political dimension in that it depends heavily on generating and leveraging the intangible resources (such as trust, commitment, ideas) that reside within social relationships.

Originality/value

The research is located within the interpretive research paradigm and thus offers an alternative view to that of conventional positivist research. Furthermore, the results indicate that learning is a strategic priority in rapidly changing environments and, thus, is a key leadership responsibility. Furthermore, the results show that value creation is a collaborative stakeholder achievement.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1931

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of…

Abstract

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of our readers before it begins. The official programme is not in the hands of members at the time we write, but the circumstances are such this year that delay has been inevitable. We have dwelt already on the good fortune we enjoy in going to the beautiful West‐Country Spa. At this time of year it is at its best, and, if the weather is more genial than this weather‐chequered year gives us reason to expect, the Conference should be memorable on that account alone. The Conference has always been the focus of library friendships, and this idea, now that the Association is so large, should be developed. To be a member is to be one of a freemasonry of librarians, pledged to help and forward the work of one another. It is not in the conference rooms alone, where we listen, not always completely awake, to papers not always eloquent or cleverly read, that we gain most, although no one would discount these; it is in the hotels and boarding houses and restaurants, over dinner tables and in the easy chairs of the lounges, that we draw out really useful business information. In short, shop is the subject‐matter of conference conversation, and only misanthropic curmudgeons think otherwise.

Details

New Library World, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1953

It is evident that the problem of the Constitution of Food and Drugs Authorities presents one of the chief obstacles to agreement among local authorities on the subject of…

Abstract

It is evident that the problem of the Constitution of Food and Drugs Authorities presents one of the chief obstacles to agreement among local authorities on the subject of local government reorganisation. For over three years, representatives of three of the four chief associations of local authorities have been conferring with a view to reaching agreement on the future structure of local government and the function of local authorities. These three Associations are: the County Councils Association, the Urban District Councils Association and the Rural District Councils Association. A large measure of agreement has been secured with respect to a great variety of functions. The chief subject on which agreement was not reached was food and drugs administration. The County Councils Association's representatives took the view that this should be the primary responsibility of County Councils, which should have power to delegate to Municipal Corporations or District Councils. The Urban District Councils Association's representatives were of opinion that the Food and Drugs Act should come wholly within the sphere of Municipal Corporations and of Urban and Rural District Councils. The Association of Municipal Corporations did not take part in the conferences ; but clearly would have insisted that Food and Drugs Act responsibility should be taken away from County Councils.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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