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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Salih Ceylan, Pınar Şahin, Serengül Seçmen, Melek Elif Somer and Kemal H. Süher

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control…

Abstract

Purpose

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control the epidemic, distance education was started shortly after the starting of the spring semester in all primary and secondary schools and universities. In this process, architectural design courses, which are one of the most fundamental courses of architectural education, started to be held in online studios. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evaluations of architecture students about the online design studio courses carried out during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a qualitative approach to evaluate the ideas of first, second, third and fourth grade students of architectural design studios in the host university. A questionnaire was directed to students in order to see their opinions about the online design studio education.

Findings

Results shows that students think the most prominent benefit of online studios appears in the use of digital tools. Another important result is that if they are equipped with the necessary tools and given the chance to realize themselves, students can work efficiently even in the distance education process.

Originality/value

This study is important in terms of learning the expectations of students from the online process and to identify important issues that should be considered for the next semesters. In addition, this study will serve as a basis for comparative evaluation of architectural education during and after the epidemic. In this context, the study will shed light on future academic research.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Kemal Cem Soylemez

This study aims to categorize user-generated content (UGC) based on the target audience, namely, brand-oriented content (BOC) and community-oriented content (COC). By…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to categorize user-generated content (UGC) based on the target audience, namely, brand-oriented content (BOC) and community-oriented content (COC). By using the equity theory, this study investigated how personal factors (motivations and self-construal) and brand/product factors (brand luxury) drive members to generate brand-oriented or COC.

Design/methodology/approach

Experimental studies were conducted with online brand community (OBC) participants who had been active in an OBC in the past 30 days.

Findings

Both in Studies 1 and 3, participants with an independent self-construal generated more BOC relative to COC, whereas participants with an interdependent self-construal generated more COC relative to BOC. In Study 1, extrinsically motivated participants generated more BOC relative to COC, whereas intrinsically motivated participants generated more COC relative to BOC. However, this finding was not confirmed in Study 3. In Study 2, the participants of luxury brand communities generated more COC relative to BOC, whereas participants of affordable brand communities generated more BOC relative to COC. However, this finding was not confirmed in Study 3.

Practical implications

This research provides marketing practitioners with an opportunity to focus on different motivation types in different contexts. The study also helps marketing departments understand the relationship between brand characteristics and UGC types. Finally, the insights of this study can also be useful in a brand extension context.

Originality/value

This study has constructed a better understanding of content generation in OBCs by categorizing UGC based on their target audience.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Aysu Akalın, Kemal Yıldırım, Çiğdem Yücel and Can Güngör

The intent and aim of the research was to look at a particular house type i.e. a terraced house with four floors, which is one of the popular designs commonly used in the…

Abstract

The intent and aim of the research was to look at a particular house type i.e. a terraced house with four floors, which is one of the popular designs commonly used in the last ten years in mass housing projects in Turkey. There are four alternatives of the type related with the cross-sectional relationship with the ground floor level. Emphasis was placed upon the "semi-cellar type" assuming that even though the level of residential satisfaction gradually increases with the possibility of interpreting the use of the open-plan floor space, and by proposing new design elements to create more adaptable and flexible spaces, the users may still experience dissatisfaction with designs where the space cannot be revised. With the use of a questionnaire, participants judged their own house as a whole and evaluated its uses for different functions and activities, complained in respect of changes required, and finally outlined their plans for the future. Despite the high level of satisfaction with having a garden (a unique characteristic in apartment-saturated Ankara), the aspect of dissatisfaction mostly referred to was the kitchen-garden relationship (or lack thereof). The residents, especially the older ones, were generally dissatisfied with the multi-storey design of their house. They prefer to remain on the backyard level without changing floors in different seasons. Besides, the users spending the longest time in the house complained more than the others and the people spending variable time in the house stated that they preferred to change the floors in different seasons. As compared to larger families, the smaller families were more likely to change floors.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Seda Yıldırım, Seda H. Bostancı, D. Çağrı Yıldırım and Fatma Erdoğan

The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and international student mobility from an alternative perspective and to reveal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and international student mobility from an alternative perspective and to reveal descriptive findings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows qualitative research methodology. In accordance with the purpose of the study, the data were collected by the literature review and then it was analyzed by the descriptive analysis method. The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on international student mobility and the relationships between these variables are explained by tables and classifications.

Findings

According to the findings obtained, the restrictions in physical student mobility and shutdown are observed as the biggest challenges that occurred in higher education during the COVID-19. On a global scope, international student mobility has experienced a major break. Physical campus life is still on standby. Online higher education does not give any campus life as before. Students cannot benefit form city's or country's facilities when studying online at home country. The collaboration between university and business has been declined and this is even more discouraging for international students. The hybrid education model produced an intermediate solution in this period. On the other hand, the rise of online education has created new techniques for higher education. University students who cannot go abroad attend different countries lectures and education programs. But also a new challenge has come as the access of online platforms in under developing countries university students. Online education system also discussed in terms of creating inequality in higher education.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on student mobility and not focused about academic mobility.

Practical implications

It is seen that the traditional higher education system has been adapted into online distance higher education system since COVID-19 crises began globally. On the other side, it is observed that most of studies have focused the effect of COVID-19 on university students based on the transition to online education. When considering the effect of pandemic process on the mobility of international students and higher education, the authors can suggest policy makers to develop new higher education protocols and teaching models supporting key issues (economic, social, health, education and equalization) in the long-term. Higher education institutes have been able to produce creative and innovative solutions for both education and communication during the pandemic process.

Social implications

University students who cannot go abroad attend different countries lectures and education programs. But also a new challenge has come as the access of online platforms in under developing countries university students. Online education system also discussed in terms of creating inequality in higher education.

Originality/value

This study provides a new perspective for international student mobility in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. This is an emerging issue for the literature. This study is original with its approach to the subject from a global perspective through reviewing the studies of different countries. This study points out key variables for determining the effect of COVID-19 on international student mobility for future studies. When employing quantitative research models, the current key variables can guide them.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Aysu Akalin, Kemal Yildirim, Christopher Wilson and Aysun Saylan

This research solicits the opinions of the residents of the Keçiören district of Ankara, Turkey, in order to learn their preferences about their local postmodern…

Abstract

This research solicits the opinions of the residents of the Keçiören district of Ankara, Turkey, in order to learn their preferences about their local postmodern environment where the municipality forces all contractors and architects to adhere to strict planning laws requiring Turkish folk and Islamic architectural references. The Municipality of Keçiören, as an agent of civil power, manages the architectural and urban transformation of the area from a district formerly composed of squatter housing to one comprised of, in the words of Robert Venturi, “decorated sheds,” in an effort to create a different looking environment rich in nostalgia and excitement. In this research, a total of 7 different sets of apartment façades were analyzed, with each set comprising three examples each of minimum complexity (representing the former condition of the district), intermediate complexity (representing “high” architecture designed by an architect, which does not exist in the district) and maximum complexity (representing the present postmodern condition of the district). The main hypothesis of the study was that preference rates would be high for intermediately altered “high style” houses by showing the existence of a U-shaped relationship between preference and complexity. That is, façades representing an intermediate level of complexity would be favored over less complex and more complex façades. It was also assumed that there would be a difference in the ratings of different age groups. A questionnaire was carried out with 50 adults (aged 30-45) and 50 high school students (aged 18-20) of Keçiören, who were asked to rate a total of 21 photographs from 7 apartment complexes with the help of a five-point semantic differential scales under three headings: preference, complexity and impressiveness. The results proved the existence of a U-shaped relationship between preference and complexity. On the other hand, younger respondents, compared to older respondents, gave more favorable ratings to the physical qualities of the photographed buildings.

Details

Open House International, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Metin Reyhanoglu and Ozden Akin

This study aims to investigate the impact of toxic leadership, organizational justice and organizational silence on hospital employees' intention to leave their jobs.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of toxic leadership, organizational justice and organizational silence on hospital employees' intention to leave their jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted with permanent and contractual employees of a university teaching hospital, including nurses, medical assistants, health technicians and clerical staff. Structural equation modeling was used to develop and test the model.

Findings

The findings reveal that toxic leadership is directly and negatively related to organizational justice, while all dimensions of organizational silence and the intention to leave are positively related. In this model, the coefficients of the relationships are found to be higher, almost doubling in permanent employees than in contracted employees, except for the relationship between toxic leadership and silence to protect the organization. This exception lies in the fact that permanent workers with long-term employment have been dealing with the managers for many years.

Research limitations/implications

The model can be extended with counterproductive behavior, work performance and satisfaction measures and work stress and compared with different sectors using higher sample volumes.

Originality/value

In the human-centered health-care industry, it is essential to know the way leadership behaviors guide health-care professionals. The negative leadership behaviors can negatively affect both employees' self-esteem and their attitudes toward patients and their relatives. The results of the present study are expected to contribute to the development of more effective manager selection and promotion policies by policy-makers as well as the determination of short- and long-term employment policies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Seda Yıldırım, Durmus Cagri Yildirim and Hande Calıskan

This study aims to explain the role of health on economic growth for OECD countries in the context of sustainable development. Accordingly, the study investigates the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain the role of health on economic growth for OECD countries in the context of sustainable development. Accordingly, the study investigates the relationship between health and economic growth in OECD countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed cluster analysis and econometric methods. By cluster analysis, 12 OECD countries (France, Germany, Finland, Slovenia, Belgium, Portugal, Estonia, Czech Republic, Hungary, South Korea, Poland and Slovakia) were classified into two clusters as high and low health status through health indicators. For panel threshold analysis, the data included growth rates, life expectancy at birth, export rates, population data, fixed capital investments, inflation and foreign direct investment for the period of 1999–2016.

Findings

The study determined two main clusters as countries with high health status (level) and low health status (level), but there was no threshold effect in clusters. It was concluded that an increase in the life expectancy at birth of countries with higher health status had no significant impact on economic growth. However, the increase in the life expectancy at birth of countries with lower health status influenced economic growth positively.

Research limitations/implications

This study used data that including period of 1999–2016 for OECD countries. In addition, the study used cluster analysis to determine health status of countries, and then panel threshold analysis was preferred to explain significant relations.

Originality/value

This study showed that the role of health on economic growth can change toward country groups as higher and lower health status. It was proved that higher life expectancy can influence economic growth positively in countries with worse or low health status. In this context, developing countries, which try to achieve sustainable development, should improve their health status to achieve economic and social development at the same time.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Murat Selim Selvi, Aykut Pajo, Ceyda Çakir and Emre Demir

Because of competition, residential property developers use a variety of promotional tools to gain recognition and increase their market share and the demand for housing…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of competition, residential property developers use a variety of promotional tools to gain recognition and increase their market share and the demand for housing, and to manage their customer relations. This study aims to examine what real estate developers did to detect the need for types of housing, and pricing and promoting housing. It also sought clues about how they manage customer relations in residential sales.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with real estate developers. This study has heuristic characteristics based on qualitative data. Document reviews, descriptive analysis and discourse analysis were carried out on the interview data and other sources. As purposeful sampling is generally used in qualitative studies; intensity sampling, homogeneous sampling, criterion sampling and snowball sampling were used together in this study.

Findings

The study found that real estate developers were inadequate at advertising and promoting, allocated little budget for promotion and did not use technology sufficiently. The real estate developers gave discounts at rates that did not actually desire, had to create payment plans, and as a result, they lost customers because they could not manage customer relations well.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were conducted with 15 real estate developers who have been selling residential properties for more than 10 years in Süleymanpasa and Çorlu districts of Tekirdag. Data obtained are mostly qualitative.

Originality/value

This study aimed to determine real estate developers’ ability to implement a variety of promotional strategies and manage customer relations. Results and conclusions can offer significant clues about real estate developers with similar characteristics. Its conclusions of this study can be compared to similar studies of real estate developers in many regions of Turkey.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Güray Kılınççeker, M. Kemal Sangün, Sema Çelik, Utku Arslan and Farhad Zarifi

Unrefined vegetable oils contain triglycerides and free fatty acids as the main ingredient, but besides, they contain waxes, phospholipids, tocopherols, β-carotene…

Abstract

Purpose

Unrefined vegetable oils contain triglycerides and free fatty acids as the main ingredient, but besides, they contain waxes, phospholipids, tocopherols, β-carotene, chlorophyll and other trace amounts depending on the type of oil. Most undesirable substances such as residues, free fatty acids and phospholipids are separated in the neutralization process of the oil refining. As a pigment, β carotene is separated by the bleaching earth (BE) in the bleaching process. The BE is disposed of as waste after the bleaching process. In this study, waste BE, which is allocated for disposal, has become reusable.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, the oil is separated from the BE by solvent extraction under room conditions. AOCS Ba 3-38, TS EN ISO 734, ISO 15305 and TS 324 standard methods were used.

Findings

As a result of the analysis, it was found that 1% of oil remained in the recovered BE. The recovered BE containing 1% oil was carbonized at 550oC for 1 and 2 h. The BE obtained after this process was used in the bleaching process at a rate of 1%. Reuse attempts were repeated seven times, colour-opening capacities were measured and BET analyses were performed to establish a relationship between surface area-discolouration capacity and reusability.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that recovery of waste BE can be performed and if this reusability considers in the industrial scale, it will save on oil refining costs and reduce waste.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Ahmet Usakli and Kemal Gurkan Kucukergin

The purpose of this study is to review the use of partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) in the field of hospitality and tourism and thereby to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the use of partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) in the field of hospitality and tourism and thereby to assess whether the PLS-SEM-based papers followed the recommended application guidelines and to investigate whether a comparison of journal types (hospitality vs tourism) and journal qualities (top-tier vs other leading) reveal significant differences in PLS-SEM use.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 206 PLS-SEM based papers published between 2000 and April 2017 in the 19 SSCI-indexed hospitality and tourism journals were critically analyzed using a wide range of guidelines for the following aspects of PLS-SEM: the rationale of using the method, the data characteristics, the model characteristics, the model assessment and reporting the technical issues.

Findings

The results reveal that some aspects of PLS-SEM are correctly applied by researchers, but there are still some misapplications, especially regarding data characteristics, formative measurement model evaluation and structural model assessment. Furthermore, few significant differences were found on the use of PLS-SEM between the two fields (hospitality and tourism) and between the journal tiers (top-tier and other leading).

Practical implications

To enhance the quality of research in hospitality and tourism, the present study provides recommendations for improving the future use of PLS-SEM.

Originality/value

The present study fills a sizeable gap in hospitality and tourism literature and extends the previous assessments on the use of PLS-SEM by providing a wider perspective on the issue (i.e. includes both hospitality and tourism journals rather than the previous reviews that focus on either tourism or hospitality), using a larger sample size of 206 empirical studies, investigating the issue over a longer time period (from 2000 to April, 2017, including the in-press articles), extending the scope of criteria (guidelines) used in the review and comparing the PLS-SEM use between the two allied fields (hospitality and tourism) and between the journal tiers (top-tier and other leading).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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