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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Kelsey Hegarty

This paper's aim is to provide an overview of how to respond to alcohol use/abuse and intimate partner violence for men and women attending primary care.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to provide an overview of how to respond to alcohol use/abuse and intimate partner violence for men and women attending primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the role of family practitioners in identifying patients in primary care who have dual problems of substance use and intimate partner violence.

Findings

Primary care is a potential site of early intervention using brief counselling techniques for male perpetrators and female victims of intimate partner violence who also have hazardous or harmful drinking.

Practical implications

Practitioners should be aware of the overlap between these two social public health problems and how to respond.

Originality/value

Practitioners often do not identify the hidden issue of intimate partner violence.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Gail Gilchrist, Sandra Davidson, Aves Middleton, Helen Herrman, Kelsey Hegarty and Jane Gunn

People with a history of depression are more likely to smoke and less likely to achieve abstinence from smoking long term. The purpose of this paper is to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

People with a history of depression are more likely to smoke and less likely to achieve abstinence from smoking long term. The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors associated with smoking and smoking cessation among patients with depression.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on smoking prevalence and cessation in a cohort of 789 primary care attendees with depressive symptoms (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score of=16) recruited from 30 randomly selected Primary Care Practices in Victoria, Australia in 2005.

Findings

At baseline, 32 per cent of participants smoked. Smokers were more likely to be male, unmarried, receive government benefits, have difficulty managing on available income, have emphysema, a chronic illness, poor self-rated health, to have more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, to be taking anti-depressants, to be hazardous drinkers, to report suicidal ideation and to have experienced childhood physical or sexual abuse. At 12 months, 20 participants reported quitting. Females and people with good or better self-rated health were significantly more likely to have quit, while people with a chronic illness or suicidal ideation were less likely to quit. Smoking cessation was not associated with increases in depression or anxiety symptoms. Only six participants remained quit over four years.

Practical implications

Rates of smoking were high, and long-term cessation was low among primary care patients with depressive symptoms. Primary care physicians should provide additional monitoring and support to assist smokers with depression quit and remain quit.

Originality/value

This is the first naturalistic study of smoking patterns among primary care attendees with depressive symptoms.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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